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Lee E. Blair, artist and Disney animator who had the rare distinction of winning an Olympic gold medal for watercolor painting, has died. He was 81. Blair died of heart failure in Santa Cruz on June 19. The Los Angeles native won his gold medal in 1932, the first year the Olympics were staged in Los Angeles, for a watercolor of a rodeo. The painting was donated to a high school and has since been lost.
August 12, 2011 | By Steven Armstrong, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Perch is a new rooftop bar and restaurant that's making downtown L.A. rethink the way it does night life. Unlike downtown's most famous rooftop bar — the ostentatious poolside lounge crowning the Standard Hotel — Perch doesn't have a pool or red Astroturf or gaggles of scantily clad partiers. It doesn't have a million-dollar lighting system or a make-believe speak-easy either. What Perch does have is a fine cocktail program, an impressive selection of French wines and spirits, a French-inspired dinner menu, panoramic views, live music and a palpable lack of pretension.
February 4, 1989
The difference between ice hockey and soccer: In soccer, the thugs are in the stands, and in ice hockey, the thugs are on the ice. MARSDEN A. THOMPSON Los Angeles
October 4, 1992
The Aug. 23 feature on fashion, "Women's Fall Fashion, The Frill of It All," was the best ever! Goodby and good riddance to the stuffy, stilted, suffocating, uniformed, business-suit look that stagnated through the '80s and early '90s. A huge welcome back to unique, flamboyant individuality. May it ever flourish! B. FISHER Loma Linda
September 18, 2007
Re "Reconciliation needed -- in D.C.," Opinion, Sept. 12 Ronald Brownstein's article asking how can we expect political reconciliation between the Sunnis and the Shiites in Iraq if we don't have it between Democrats and Republicans in Washington overlooks a key point: Reconciliation does not mean agreeing with each other, it means talking with each other toward a common goal. We have peaceful, albeit sometimes acrimonious, talking in our capital; we have violence and wanton murder in Iraq.
February 24, 1989 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writer and
Emperor Hirohito, a man once despised by much of the world as the symbol of ruthless Japanese military aggression, was honored by the international community today as kings, presidents and other representatives of 163 countries attended his elaborate state funeral.
December 8, 1992
President Richard von Weizsaeker recently reminded his fellow citizens that a key reason democracy failed in Germany in the 1920s was that there simply weren't enough German democrats around to support it. It has become especially clear in the last few weeks that a lot of ordinary Germans are determined that this devastating experience, which led first to the triumph of Nazism and ultimately to Germany's wartime destruction and division, won't be repeated in the 1990s.
October 11, 2009 | Ed Park, Park is a founding editor of the Believer and the author of "Personal Days: A Novel." His Astral Weeks column appears monthly at
The Complete Stories of J.G. Ballard J.G. Ballard W.W. Norton: 1,200 pp., $35 Readers anxious about reading "The Complete Stories of J.G. Ballard" -- now appearing in the U.S. for the first time -- may care to approach it in the form of a simple word game. Ballard, who died this spring in London at age 78, wrote prolifically in and out of the science fiction genre, and the pleasures of this book are as plentiful as its mass is intimidating. The guide below (inspired by the format of Ballard's do-it-yourself espionage narrative "The Beach Murders")
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