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Distress

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2010 | Anne Loader McGee
Gil Martin hated going on field trips to the Art Museum with his fifth grade class. And he especially hated hearing his teacher, Mrs. Hornsby, ramble on about the artists and all their wonderful paintings. Gil decided he'd had enough. So when the group disappeared down the hallway, he stayed to rest on a bench. As Mrs. Hornsby's voice faded into the distance, Gil heard a moan. He looked around, but he was alone in the room. He heard a second moan. It seemed to come from the painting hanging on the wall.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HOME & GARDEN
March 28, 2014 | By Amy Helmes
Approaching self-declared spinsterhood, I blamed Jane Austen. Having read all her novels and watched achingly gorgeous film adaptations thereof, I would consider only men who epitomized one of those gallant and stouthearted Regency-era heroes (barring the breeches and riding jackets because, well, I had to be realistic). Yet here was the sad but universal truth: If Jane Austen couldn't find a suitable mate in her day and age - she never married - there was no way in hell I'd ever find my "Mr. Darcy" in L.A., of all places.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2012
'Damsels in Distress' MPAA rating: PG-13 for mature thematic content including some sexual material Running time: 1 hour, 39 minutes Playing: At the Landmark, West Los Angeles; ArcLight Cinemas, Hollywood
SPORTS
January 11, 2014 | By Mike Bresnahan
Pau Gasol considered the question. Was this the worst loss he'd ever experienced in the regular season? There were surely more painful ones in his career, but they were followed by months of basketball silence - Game 6 of the 2008 NBA Finals: Boston 131, Lakers 92; Game 4 of the 2011 Western Conference semifinals: Dallas 122, Lakers 86; Game 4 of the first round last season: San Antonio 103, Lakers 82. Friday's embarrassment against the Clippers...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1992
The new 29-cent stamp picturing the White House and the American flag is both beautiful and patriotic. As a symbol of distress, I place these stamps on my letters upside down. All the world knows that displaying a country's flag upside down is a sign of disaster. Let's all affix our stamps this way as long as there is a Republican in the White House. ERNEST A. BECKER Fullerton
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2012 | By Mark Olsen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It's been nearly 15 years since his last feature, but the influence of writer-director Whit Stillman, the indie auteur who assayed the social and emotional mores of an urban haute bourgeoisie with his films "Metropolitan," "Barcelona" and "The Last Days of Disco," has only grown, his talky nuance and spiky affection becoming more resonant with time. Which makes the new "Damsels in Distress" both such a welcome return and somewhat of an unexpected departure. Pitched as something of an old-fashioned campus comedy, the film, set to open in March, follows a group of coeds led by the determined Violet (Greta Gerwig)
SCIENCE
October 14, 2013 | By Amina Khan
A hug isn't a solely human impulse - bonobos do it too, to comfort distressed peers or to make up after a fight. Now, a study at a Congolese sanctuary finds that young bonobos who could handle their own emotions were better at offering others a shoulder to lean on. What's more, bonobos raised by their mothers were much better at these social and emotional skills than orphaned bonobos. The research, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, highlights the importance of mother-child bonds in developing such social and emotional abilities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 1990
There are kind, helpful young men in our society! While driving alone the morning of June 26 on the San Diego Freeway through the Santa Monica Mountains, my car suddenly stopped. After several cars and trucks went around me, a young man pulled up in front, offered to call the CHP on his phone and immediately drove off. Next a van stopped, three young men jumped out and pushed my car across an on-ramp to the shoulder. They jumped back into their vehicle and off they went. The CHP arrived and called the Automobile Assn.
NEWS
March 21, 1986 | Associated Press
A distress call from a yacht reported to be sinking with 10 people aboard sent the Coast Guard searching Thursday up and down the coast and in four ports, but no signs of the boat or crew were found. A Coast Guard spokesman described the distress call as unusual and said no record of the boat had been found.
HEALTH
September 8, 2008 | Chris Woolston, Special to The Times
The products: Humans have long believed in an almost magical connection between strong flavors and good health. The burn from the hot pepper? It must be energizing the body. The pungent tang of a raw oyster? It must be energizing a very particular part of the body. And the zingy sweetness of an Indian curry? For centuries, people in India have believed that the spice turmeric can ease digestive distress and arthritis. In recent years, scientists have taken an intense interest in curcumin, a bright-yellow compound in turmeric that seems to fight inflammation -- in test tubes and lab rodents, at least.
SCIENCE
October 14, 2013 | By Amina Khan
A hug isn't a solely human impulse - bonobos do it too, to comfort distressed peers or to make up after a fight. Now, a study at a Congolese sanctuary finds that young bonobos who could handle their own emotions were better at offering others a shoulder to lean on. What's more, bonobos raised by their mothers were much better at these social and emotional skills than orphaned bonobos. The research, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, highlights the importance of mother-child bonds in developing such social and emotional abilities.
BUSINESS
October 11, 2013 | By Shan Li and Ricardo Lopez
It might seem like a paid vacation for the 500,000 federal workers on furlough. They've been out of work since last week and were promised back pay once a budget is passed and the government reopens. But for many rank-and-file employees who live paycheck to paycheck, the shutdown is proving to be a massive financial headache. Some say their savings have been wiped out after a three-year pay freeze and a previous round of furloughs during the summer. The nation's ideological battle over healthcare and spending is hitting these workers in the pocketbook.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2013
The goofy, absurd horror-comedy "Bad Milo!" is a cult classic in the making. Its lo-fi charms - the cutesy-scary monster design, earnest family values and Danny Elfman-esque soundtrack - make the film feel like an '80s throwback in a way that justifies the nostalgia. But enjoyment of the film will depend on one's delight in endless jokes about one man's behind. In an early scene, married couple Duncan (Ken Marino) and Sara (Gillian Jacobs) stare intensely at an ultrasound screen, impatient for the news that'll change their lives.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 2013 | By Alan Zarembo
Army Spc. James Christian Paquette walked into the benefits office at Ft. Wainwright, Alaska, with a question: Did his military life insurance policy pay in cases of suicide? He was assured that it did. Less than two weeks later, he shot and killed himself - and his family collected $400,000. His widow struggles with the question of whether he would have proceeded with his plan if suicide had not been covered. "He just wanted to know we would be provided for," Jami Calahan said.
BUSINESS
August 16, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
In the Glendale offices of her two cosmetics companies, New York financier Lynn Tilton makes a surprising claim: Not that long ago, she wasn't all that interested in makeup. It's unexpected not just because Tilton owns the Jane and Stila lines of primping products. She also makes the declaration while a professional makeup artist touches up her glossy pout and shimmery eyelids. Rounding out her look are towering stilettos, voluminously teased blond hair, French-tipped nails and a cleavage-baring shirt just sheer enough to show off a belly button jewel.
BUSINESS
June 26, 2013 | By Ken Bensinger, Los Angeles Times
Argentina asked the U.S. Supreme Court to overturn an appeals court ruling that could force it to pay certain creditors more than $1.3 billion in a drawn-out fight over the country's 2001 default on sovereign debt. The South American nation's appeal, filed Monday, stems from its failure to pay on $100 billion in bonds, the largest default in history. It was eventually able to restructure more than 92% of that debt, exchanging the bonds for ones that were worth about two-thirds less.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2013 | By Garrett Therolf, Los Angeles Times
The Coast Guard on Tuesday suspended its search for four people, including two young children, who were believed to be missing after a distress call from what was said to be a sinking sailboat in the ocean south of San Francisco. Officials are investigating the possibility that the incident was a hoax. Searchers using aircraft and sea vessels found "no signs of distress, no signs of debris, no reports of missing people," Coast Guard spokesman Mike Lutz said. The agency will continue to investigate the case, including whether the initial distress call was a hoax, Lutz said.
OPINION
June 20, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
On the drawing board, enterprise zones were a good idea. The state identified 40 economically distressed parts of the state where businesses would get tax breaks if they located there and hired local workers. They would be good for small companies: Tax credits for them could make the difference between staying in business or failing. They would be good for many workers: Employers who otherwise wouldn't give them a second look would instead give them training and job opportunities. They would be good for disadvantaged communities: Areas that were economically distressed would be able to demonstrate that they were good for business, could attract more employers and move more people from the unemployment rolls to the tax rolls.
OPINION
June 8, 2013
Re "After suicide, singular grief," Column, June 4 Thanks for Sandy Banks' exploration of the severe emotional distress after the suicide of a loved one. I was shellshocked at the suicide in 1999 of my beloved daughter, Misty. The telephone words, just two, came simply: "She's dead. " And after the crisis, that paralytic chill - a parent's life is never the same. But unlike the family in Banks' column, I felt no guilt, just an unbelieving sense of loss. Today, however, it's more the wistfulness of missing her; for like Banks' respondent said, I understand that "her death taught me to live a better, more meaningful life.
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