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Dive Bar

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2013 | By Jessica Gelt
The Roost: Because you like drinking with your grandpa - or just that guy at the end of the bar who looks like him. A dyed-in-the-wool dive in Atwater Village, the Roost is the kind of place you go to get lost. It's dark inside, day and night, with the sole illumination coming from a series of hanging lights equipped with dim red bulbs that make the place feel comfortingly womb-like. Worn, red booths line the walls, and the tables are topped with faux-wood Formica that is peeling up at the corners.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2014 | By Samantha Schaefer
Charles Bukowski was known for his drinking as much as his poetry. So maybe, the man Time magazine once described as "the laureate of lowlife," would have approved of a 20th-anniversary memorial held in his honor at the dimly lighted King Eddy Saloon on the edge of skid row. The dive bar, said to be a favorite haunt of the poet and his own idol, novelist John Fante, was filled with Bukowski fans Sunday, spilling out onto the street in a...
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2013 | By Martha Groves, Los Angeles Times
At the bar where a circus elephant and the Rat Pack partied - not at the same time - a couple clink martini glasses. Their faces glow in the late-afternoon light pouring through a porthole. Behind them in the otherwise cave-like room, trimmed year-round with strands of Christmas lights, a busboy moves across wood chips and peanut shells scattered on the pocked concrete floor. He places red napkins atop red-and-white-checked tablecloths grown dingy with wear as Frank Sinatra croons the 1966 hit "Summer Wind" on the jukebox.
HOME & GARDEN
November 29, 2013 | Chris Erskine
The steakhouse may be America's greatest single achievement. Sure, there's that Constitution everyone's so impressed with, and baseball and Elizabeth Banks. But if you had to narrow it down to one thing, one crowning glorious creation that captures the nation's spirit and pastoral roots, it's probably a red-boothed steakhouse, where the waitresses are as old as the best wines, and platters of beef are presented presidentially. In a good steakhouse, every man feels part king, part cowboy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2014 | By Samantha Schaefer
Charles Bukowski was known for his drinking as much as his poetry. So maybe, the man Time magazine once described as "the laureate of lowlife," would have approved of a 20th-anniversary memorial held in his honor at the dimly lighted King Eddy Saloon on the edge of skid row. The dive bar, said to be a favorite haunt of the poet and his own idol, novelist John Fante, was filled with Bukowski fans Sunday, spilling out onto the street in a...
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2013 | By Jessica Gelt, Los Angeles Times
Things have been done in the bathrooms of Little Joy that would make even Keith Richards' skin crawl. The Echo Park dive bar was also notorious for the amount of times drunk, scrappy rockers got beat up outside of it. (Nobody likes a drunk, scrappy rocker. Not even other drunk, scrappy rockers.) And for more than 40 years, Little Joy was home to them all as well as a completely bent assortment of neighborhood characters, bums and druggies. In short, it was the Enabler's favorite dive for a couple of years.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2010 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
There's a kind of wicked irony around every corner in "The Good Heart," where nothing and everything turns out exactly as it should in this story of second chances and the duck that got away. The film stars Brian Cox and Paul Dano as two mismatched souls who end up in the same hospital room, both having barely cheated death and only one happy about it. But instead of two ships passing in the night, circumstances conspire to toss them into the same lifeboat, metaphorically speaking, of course, since the story unfolds mostly in a New York City dive bar of the seediest sort.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2012 | By Jessica Gelt, Los Angeles Times
A new British pub and restaurant called the Pikey opened on Easter in the space that used to house the more than 70-year-old dive bar Ye Coach & Horses. When that relic closed nearly two years ago due to a controversial eviction, a spirited Save the Coach & Horses campaign ensued, followed by a flutter of press. Then it was over — the bar closed and the city moved on. When the curtain was again raised on the latest incarnation of the historic room — where famous British ex-pats Alfred Hitchcock and Richard Burton were known to tipple — it became clear that a new era had dawned for the place: A cleaner, brighter era without the questionable bathroom facilities and lager-drenched industrial carpet.
FOOD
July 29, 2010 | By Jessica Gelt, Los Angeles Times
Ye Coach &Horses, the Sunset Boulevard juke joint near Curson Avenue that has been in business for more than 70 years, is being evicted by its landlord and neighbor, Samuel French bookstore. The eviction notice, which was delivered July 1 and requires that the tenant be out by Aug. 1, has sparked a passionate online campaign to save the little trapped-in-amber dive bar. As with most stories in Hollywood, the tale of the bar's impending closure involves the cult of celebrity, the fickle winds of fate, the city's oft-lamented historical amnesia and a liberal dose of alcohol-fueled hedonism.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2013 | By Jessica Gelt, Los Angeles Times
The Enabler has fretted about the fate of the legendary Skid Row dive bar the King Eddy Saloon since it was bought by new owners and closed for renovations in December. King Eddy, which first opened in 1933, has a history of attracting literary types, including John Fante and Charles Bukowski, along with a rough and tumble cast of blue collar workers, homeless folks and artists. It was easy to imagine the new owners, Acme Bar Group, making it a place for the fancy pants set. The thought made the Enabler want to smash a bottle of vermouth over her head.
TRAVEL
August 10, 2013 | By Irene Lechowitzky
If dogs could talk, they'd sing the praises of Ocean Beach, a laid-back San Diego neighborhood. Here, canines have top-dog status - they even have their own beach. There's much for humans to like as well in what's known as the People's Republic of Ocean Beach. O.B. retains its '60s vibe; it's funky, not plastic, and hippies still roam the streets. Newport Avenue, its main drag, is chockfull of dive bars, head shops and surf shops. Savor the mellow side of life during the day: Stroll on the pier or hop on a bike and ride along the beach.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2013 | By Jessica Gelt
The Roost: Because you like drinking with your grandpa - or just that guy at the end of the bar who looks like him. A dyed-in-the-wool dive in Atwater Village, the Roost is the kind of place you go to get lost. It's dark inside, day and night, with the sole illumination coming from a series of hanging lights equipped with dim red bulbs that make the place feel comfortingly womb-like. Worn, red booths line the walls, and the tables are topped with faux-wood Formica that is peeling up at the corners.
BUSINESS
June 20, 2013 | By Cale Ottens and Roger Vincent, Los Angeles Times
Aspiring punk-rock and alternative bands packed patrons into grungy Al's Bar in downtown Los Angeles throughout the 1980s and 1990s, making it one of the West Coast's best-known venues for hearing edgy music of the era. Well-known performers such as the Red Hot Chili Peppers, Nirvana, the Fall, Sonic Youth, Beck and the Misfits all strode the modest stage in the dive bar at 303 S. Hewitt St. before they made it big. The bar closed in 2001 but...
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2013 | By Jessica Gelt, Los Angeles Times
Things have been done in the bathrooms of Little Joy that would make even Keith Richards' skin crawl. The Echo Park dive bar was also notorious for the amount of times drunk, scrappy rockers got beat up outside of it. (Nobody likes a drunk, scrappy rocker. Not even other drunk, scrappy rockers.) And for more than 40 years, Little Joy was home to them all as well as a completely bent assortment of neighborhood characters, bums and druggies. In short, it was the Enabler's favorite dive for a couple of years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2013 | By Martha Groves, Los Angeles Times
At the bar where a circus elephant and the Rat Pack partied - not at the same time - a couple clink martini glasses. Their faces glow in the late-afternoon light pouring through a porthole. Behind them in the otherwise cave-like room, trimmed year-round with strands of Christmas lights, a busboy moves across wood chips and peanut shells scattered on the pocked concrete floor. He places red napkins atop red-and-white-checked tablecloths grown dingy with wear as Frank Sinatra croons the 1966 hit "Summer Wind" on the jukebox.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2013 | By Jessica Gelt, Los Angeles Times
The Enabler has fretted about the fate of the legendary Skid Row dive bar the King Eddy Saloon since it was bought by new owners and closed for renovations in December. King Eddy, which first opened in 1933, has a history of attracting literary types, including John Fante and Charles Bukowski, along with a rough and tumble cast of blue collar workers, homeless folks and artists. It was easy to imagine the new owners, Acme Bar Group, making it a place for the fancy pants set. The thought made the Enabler want to smash a bottle of vermouth over her head.
BUSINESS
June 20, 2013 | By Cale Ottens and Roger Vincent, Los Angeles Times
Aspiring punk-rock and alternative bands packed patrons into grungy Al's Bar in downtown Los Angeles throughout the 1980s and 1990s, making it one of the West Coast's best-known venues for hearing edgy music of the era. Well-known performers such as the Red Hot Chili Peppers, Nirvana, the Fall, Sonic Youth, Beck and the Misfits all strode the modest stage in the dive bar at 303 S. Hewitt St. before they made it big. The bar closed in 2001 but...
NEWS
May 11, 2012 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
At the world premiere Thursday night of Anne LeBaron's darkly mysterious, troubling yet weirdly exuberant and wonderfully performed new opera "Crescent City," a young Reveler in the production frolicked a few feet from where I was sitting on a folding chair along the perimeter of the experimental art space, Atwater Crossing. She wore a skirt fashioned out of the Arts & Books section of this newspaper, and she was close enough that I could read a few crumpled lines. But she was hardly there to make me or any other Angeleno feel remotely at home.
NATIONAL
January 26, 2013 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
LAS VEGAS - Double Down Saloon owner P Moss sits at the corner of the bar across from a skinny, sad-eyed man with a cascading white ZZ Top beard. "Let's go over to a table," Moss instructs a visitor, eyeing the old barfly named Wade, who continued to toss out disconnected thoughts. "This one can often be quite a handful. " Wade's a military veteran who, since his son died a few years back, spends his waking hours at this dark, profane, scribbled-upon dive bar in the shadow of the Strip.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 2012 | By Martha Groves, Los Angeles Times
Chez Jay, a hole-in-the-wall eatery in Santa Monica, became as legendary as its clientele by serving as a safe haven for the likes of Henry Kissinger, Fred Astaire, John Belushi, Clint Eastwood, Judy Garland and Rat Packers Frank Sinatra and Peter Lawford. Lee Marvin once rode in on his motorcycle to order a drink at the bar. In 1971, Daniel Ellsberg reportedly passed the Pentagon Papers to a New York Times reporter at the restaurant's fabled Table 10. On Monday night, in recognition of the cozy bar and restaurant's importance to the city's cultural, social and political history, the Santa Monica Landmarks Commission voted unanimously to designate Chez Jay as a local landmark.
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