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OPINION
July 5, 1998
Re diversity: America used to be the melting pot. Nowadays everybody wants their own burner. IRENE W. PARKER, Covina
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 5, 2014
Re "The quest for diversity," Editorial, March 28 Your editorial on Proposition 209 and diversity at California's public universities is unclear and patronizing. It is unclear in endorsing as the benchmark of "meaningful racial diversity" the University of California's "diversity goals" - goals that the university has not itself enunciated. One can try and divine what the university's goals are, but with little success. Apparently, exceeding the pre-Proposition 209 minority enrollment (except for African American students at Berkeley and UCLA)
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OPINION
March 28, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
The 40-year debate over affirmative action at state universities generally has been conducted in terms of general principles. At first, advocates emphasized the importance of compensating African Americans (and later others) for the effects of generations of discrimination, while opponents contended that the Constitution must be colorblind. Later, the debate shifted to the claim that there are educational benefits to a racially diverse student body, a rationale for preferences that the Supreme Court grudgingly has accepted.
HOME & GARDEN
April 5, 2014 | By Lisa Boone
On a recent weekday afternoon, the South Coast Collection in Costa Mesa is inhabited by an eclectic crowd - young hipsters sipping lattes at Portola Coffee Lab, professionals in business suits nibbling on carnitas de pato at Taco Maria, moms pushing strollers, and employees from nearby businesses simply enjoying the open-air courtyards. Designers can be spotted in the design showrooms too, as they stop to eye the furnishings on display in the more than 20 stores specializing in home design.
OPINION
October 4, 2012
Re "Supreme Court tests for civil rights," Editorial, Oct. 1 The University of Texas' policy of admitting all students who finish in the top 10% of their classes is a major endeavor toward diversity. But Texas bowed to the continued whining over diversity when it began to consider race as a factor in freshman admissions. The hysteria over diversity is out of control. Any institution that is truly diverse should be proud that it is so. But the voices that demand diversity in every sector of our society are confused.
NEWS
January 10, 2013 | By Carla Hall
In the wake of President Obama's reelection, there was much clucking about the demise of the political power of white men and the inability of Mitt Romney -- the quintessential Republican white man -- to capture the support and votes of women and minorities and other Americans increasingly disenchanted with the conservative party's message. Yet, if you looked at the Dec. 29 photo of Obama meeting with senior advisors in the Oval Office, which made the front of the New York Times on Wednesday, you would rest assured that white men are still very much in power -- in the first black president's White House, as it turns out.  In the photo, 10 of his 11 advisors standing before him are men, and eight of them are white.  The one woman, who is black, in the photo is Valerie Jarrett, which you only know because it says so in the caption of the photo.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2011 | By Greg Braxton, Los Angeles Times
In most respects, BET's "Reed Between the Lines" fits snugly within the safe cookie-cutter mold of the traditional family sitcom — successful, attractive parents with adorable kids tackle the daily challenges of life and resolve them in less than 30 minutes. The upbeat comedy, starring Tracee Ellis Ross ("Girlfriends") and Malcolm-Jamal Warner ("The Cosby Show") as the heads of a loving family, recalls the subject matter and tone of "The Cosby Show" — the 1980s program also built around an African American family that helped revive the sitcom genre 25 years ago with a smart and gentle mix of humor and poignancy.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
Everyone knows Texas -- pronounced Teh-has in Spanish -- is becoming an increasingly Latino state. (It's 38% Hispanic, according to the Census Bureau). Texas' Hispanic future is a kind of running joke among demographers and political pundits. The other day, New York Times columnist Gail Collins pointed out that the Democratic strategy to take back the reins of government there is “waiting around for all the Hispanic children to grow up and start voting.” Unfortunately, it seems no one pointed that out this year to the organizers of the Texas Book Festival.
BUSINESS
September 15, 2011 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
Further evidence has emerged that Hollywood has made little progress in hiring women and minorities to work on prime-time television shows. A survey conducted by the Directors Guild of America of more than 2,600 television episodes from 170 scripted TV series for the 2010-11 season found that white males directed 77% of all episodes, and white females directed 11% of all episodes. Minority males directed 11% all episodes and minority females directed just 1% of the shows, according to the DGA survey.
NEWS
June 29, 2012 | By Nicole Sperling and Julie Makinen
If the 2012 class of Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences invitees seemed a tad more diverse than in past years, you weren't imagining things. Academy officials say 14% of the 176 new invitees are people of color, an increase over 2011, when the percentage was 10%. Among the African Americans invited were actresses Octavia Spencer, Kerry Washington, S. Epatha Merkerson; "Soul Food" producer Tracey Edmonds and “Think Like a Man” producer Will Packer; 77-year-old animator Floyd Norman; documentarian Sam Pollard; studio executive Michael Marshall; and director Kasi Lemmons ("Eve's Bayou")
OPINION
March 28, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
The 40-year debate over affirmative action at state universities generally has been conducted in terms of general principles. At first, advocates emphasized the importance of compensating African Americans (and later others) for the effects of generations of discrimination, while opponents contended that the Constitution must be colorblind. Later, the debate shifted to the claim that there are educational benefits to a racially diverse student body, a rationale for preferences that the Supreme Court grudgingly has accepted.
OPINION
March 24, 2014 | By Steven Hill
Earlier this month, Santa Clarita settled a California Voting Rights Act lawsuit, and in doing so became the first city in California to embrace innovative election rules that could point the way to a more representative politics. The lawsuit, filed last year, grew out of major demographic changes in the city. Not only had Santa Clarita grown by more than 60% since 1990; it had also seen a sharp increase in the city's non-white population, which went from 31% to 44% over a 10-year period, with Latinos now making up almost a third of the city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 2014 | By Hailey Branson-Potts
Councilman John Duran and his gay colleagues on the West Hollywood City Council never expected a backlash when they voted recently to remove the rainbow flag from above City Hall. For Duran, who is gay, taking down the flag wasn't about slighting gays but sending a message about the city's diversity. "It's not just a city of gay men. It belongs to heterosexual people as well," he said. But the flag's removal in a place synonymous with gay life outraged many, and the city this week changed course, raising above City Hall a flag with a rainbow-colored city logo.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2014 | By Greg Braxton
CBS has signed talent holding deals with three performers from its annual Diversity Comedy Showcase, including one for a key role in the pilot for the spinoff of CBS' "How I Met Your Mother. " Drew Tarver, who has appeared on "Animal Practice" and the Web series "Get Up," has been cast in a ensemble role for "How I Met Your Dad. " The actor is a member of the Upright Citizen Brigade Harold Team. Also signed to deals were Haneefah Wood, who has appeared in several Broadway productions including "Rent" and "Avenue Q", and Nico Santos, who has appeared as a recurring panelist on "Chelsea Lately" and has written for "Fashion Police.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2014 | By J.C. Gabel
Although he would hardly cause a blip on cultural radar screens today, Carl Van Vechten was, at various stages of his long and storied life, a journalist, provocateur, novelist, nightlife denizen, music and theater critic, confidant to Gertrude Stein, patron of the Harlem Renaissance, literary dandy, urban impresario, portrait photographer, archivist of Modernism and all-together man about town. A person of seemingly endless contradictions, Van Vechten was known for his many affairs with men - yet married to Fania Marinoff, a Russian actress and dancer, for almost 50 years.
NEWS
February 13, 2014 | By Michael McGough
Sen. Elizabeth Warren's populist crusade has a new objective: preventing “a corporate capture of the federal courts.” The Massachusetts Democrat and progressive heroine graciously concedes that “there are some really talented judges who came from the private sector.” But she insists that “it matters that someone has represented people other than corporate clients, that they've had real experience with people who can't afford lawyers, that...
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2005
How can Maria Elena Fernandez say "ER" has been "long considered the gold standard of diversity"? [" 'Lost' Takes an Odd Path to Diversity," Feb. 13]. Nearly one out of every six doctors in the United States is of Asian descent, yet producer John Wells waited five seasons to include one Asian American regular, played by Ming-Na. Wells, like most Hollywood producers, does see race first. A white person is allowed to play anything, but a person of color is usually added only after the more dominant (white)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2014 | By Greg Braxton
Hollywood still isn't reflecting the nation's diversity in its entertainment products, and that omission is costing the industry considerable amounts in lost revenues. That's the main conclusion of a comprehensive report about diversity in the film and TV industry released Wednesday by UCLA's Ralph J. Bunche Center for African American Studies. The study, which is titled "2014 Hollywood Diversity Report: Making Sense of the Disconnect," finds that minorities and women are represented far below their corresponding percentages in the general population.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2014 | By Reed Johnson
When the Skirball Cultural Center launched its Latin Jewish film series seven years ago, it caught some members of both ethnic groups by surprise. "People acted just shocked that there were Jews south of the border," said Jordan Peimer, the Skirball's director of programs. Today, that idea isn't likely to startle Skirball regulars. Over the years, the series, which was initially funded by the Irvine Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts, has exposed filmgoers to the Jews of Cuba (the documentary "Jubanos")
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