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Dixie Carter

ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 1996
Two four-hour dramas ripped from newspaper headlines go head-to-head Sunday night. Shannen Doherty, Edward Asner, Dixie Carter and Kevin Dillon star in CBS' "Gone in the Night," at 9 p.m. on Channel 2. Doherty and Dillon play a Chicago couple who are arrested for the murder of their missing daughter. When the husband is found guilty, his wife sets out to prove his innocence. The drama concludes Tuesday at 9 p.m. Over on NBC at 9 p.m.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 1990 | IRV LETOFSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The press-release warfare between actress Delta Burke and the producers of "Designing Women" intensified Monday even as production began on the CBS sitcom's fourth season. In the latest barrage, executive producers Linda Bloodworth-Thomason and Harry Thomason released 12 pages of statements from co-star Dixie Carter and other people connected with the show rebutting Burke's claims last week that the producers were unsupportive and abusive to her.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1993 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two long-running series--CBS' "Designing Women" and NBC's "Quantum Leap"--will leap into history next month, the victims of cancellation. The networks said Thursday that both series will feature farewell episodes in May, joining three other veteran series--NBC's "Cheers," CBS' "Knots Landing" and ABC's "The Wonder Years"--that are also taking their final bows this season.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 1989 | PATRICIA BRENNAN, THE WASHINGTON POST
As a teen-ager, she won 18 beauty pageants. In 1975, as Miss Florida, she won the Miss America talent contest with a dramatic presentation. But she was forever fighting extra pounds, and this television season it is obvious that "Designing Women's" Delta Burke, although still beautiful, has grown heavy. Plump. Chunky. Stout. Fat. Burke does not deny it.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 1990 | JOAN HANAUER, UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL
There will be some changes made when they give out the Tony Awards this year if Joseph Cates has his way. He wants to take out the glitzy variety numbers and all those boring thank-you speeches. Cates, who has a couple of Emmys on his shelf for past musical programs, is likely to prevail since he's the executive producer of "The 44th Annual Tony Awards" special to air on CBS Sunday at 9 p.m.
NEWS
March 12, 1993 | BETTY GOODWIN
The Scene: The appearance of Bobby Short--a fixture at New York's Cafe Carlyle--at the Wilshire Ebell Theater Wednesday night for a fund-raiser for AIDS Project Los Angeles. Afterward, supper was served in a banquet hall at the Scottish Rite Masonic Temple, converted into a twinkly, candlelit nightclub for the occasion.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 1998 | JAN HERMAN
Tony Bennett, Andrea Marcovicci, Rita Moreno and McCoy Tyner top a list of more than a dozen headliners coming to the Orange County Performing Arts Center in Costa Mesa for the facility's 1998-99 Cabaret Series, Jazz Club and Legendary Masters of Jazz series, center officials announced today. Performers and dates for the Legendary Masters of Jazz series in 3,000-seat Segerstrom Hall are: the Count Basie Orchestra, conducted by Grover Mitchell (Oct. 25, 4 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2012 | By David Ng, Los Angeles Times
Few actors own a role the way Hal Holbrook owns Mark Twain. The Tony- and Emmy-winning actor, who recently turned 87, has played the humorist in his one-man stage play "Mark Twain Tonight!" since 1954, logging thousands of performances and many more miles traveling with the show. But longevity doesn't necessarily guarantee that you have an exclusive monopoly on a part. A relative newbie to the Twain game, Val Kilmer recently launched his own one-man play, "Citizen Twain," running in a workshop production at the Masonic Lodge at the Hollywood Forever cemetery through Wednesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 1990 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER WRITER
It was H.L. Mencken's stated conviction that Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen didn't deal in extraordinary thoughts, just obvious ones ". . . ideas of the utmost simplicity," he insisted. "There is nothing mysterious in them; there is not even anything new in them. Above all, there is no idiotic symbolism in them. They mean just what they say." Director Stein Winge appears to think so too.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 1991 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To borrow a lyric from its most famous song, let's see how bewitched, bothered and bewildered we are by the Long Beach Civic Light Opera revival of Rodgers and Hart's "Pal Joey." A couple of scenes in the second act qualify as bewitching. "Den of Iniquity" is a seriously steamy bedroom duet between rich lady Vera Simpson (Dixie Carter) and her younger lover Joey (Peter Reardon). From my well-positioned seat, I could almost see the sweat.
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