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Dizzy Gillespie

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 1997
* MUSIC: Ami Porat leads his orchestra, the Mozart Camerata, in a Mozart program at Irvine Barclay Theatre, Saturday night at 8, and at St. Andrew's Church in Newport Beach, Sunday at 4 p.m. Daniel Shapiro will be the soloist in the Piano Concerto No. 15. The program will also include the symphonies Nos. 1 and 36 ("Linz"). . . . James Vail conducts Bach's "Christmas" Oratorio at St. Alban's Episcopal Church in Westwood, Sunday at 3 p.m. . . . Also in Westwood, Sunday at 4 p.m.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2014 | By Chris Barton
There are few surer bets in the concert industry than an anniversary celebration. Seen across the musical spectrum, including recent tours commemorating Miles Davis' "Kind of Blue" as well as this year's star-studded televised salute to the Beatles, such tributes reliably serve two constituencies in showing young listeners the value of history while allowing longtime fans to savor a bit of nostalgia. At a crowded Walt Disney Concert Hall on Saturday night, the Los Angeles Philharmonic offered a doubleheader of such tributes with "60+60," a concert featuring two ensembles that honored the 60th anniversaries of the Newport Jazz Festival and the landmark live recording "Jazz at Massey Hall.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 1997 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Dizzy Gillespie in action--especially in his later years--was a sight to behold. Cheeks puffed out to bullfrog dimensions, holding his golden brass trumpet, its bell pointed to the sky, he was a true jazz original. And not just because of his visual image, unique as it was, but because he was one of the true creators of bebop, the music that continues, into the '90s, to have a subtle but powerful impact upon both jazz and popular music.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2014 | By Don Heckman
Med Flory, an alto saxophonist and founder of the Grammy-winning jazz group Supersax in addition to being an actor who appeared on numerous TV series, has died. He was 87. His son, Rex, who cared for his father during several years of heart maladies, reported that Flory died Wednesday at his home in North Hollywood. Flory had not been professionally active over the last few years, a shift from the busy demands of a career stretching over six decades. One of Hollywood's most unusual hyphenates, he was successful in two creatively demanding arenas.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 1988 | LEONARD FEATHER
More than three decades have elapsed since the release of an album entitled "Dizzy Gillespie: World Statesman." At that time Gillespie was leading an all-star orchestra in the Middle East on the first jazz tour ever sent overseas under official State Department auspices. Of the many international events with which the trumpeter has since been involved, none has been more distinctly multicultural in character than the 15-piece orchestra he organized last month for a domestic tour.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1989 | KEVIN THOMAS
There's an unasked question hovering over Don Holland's "A Night in Havana: Dizzy Gillespie in Cuba" (at the Nuart through Tuesday) that casts an unfortunate shadow over an otherwise infectious documentary on the great jazz trumpeter's 1985 trip to Cuba to headline the fifth International Jazz Festival of Havana.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1993 | LEONARD FEATHER
Eight trumpeters gathered at Inglewood's Southland Cultural Center on Tuesday for a tribute to their role model--the late Dizzy Gillespie. Produced by center director Barbara Morrison, with trumpeter-vocalist Clora Bryant as musical director, the evening began with the horns of Bryant, Al Aarons, Marcus Belgrave, Oscar Brashear, Jon Faddis, Chuck Findley and Clark Terry in a round robin on Gillespie's "Tour de Force," with everyone kicking in at optimum power.
NEWS
July 13, 1986
Dillon (Curly) Russell, a bassist who was part of the 1945 Dizzy Gillespie quintet that first recorded be-bop, has died of respiratory ailments. Russell was 69 and died July 3 in a New York City hospital. He lived and worked in New York most of his life. A native of Trinidad, Russell went on the road with the Don Redman band in 1941. He joined Benny Carter in 1943 and came with Carter to California where he made records and became part of t1751457895orchestras.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 1993 | DOUG RAMSEY, Doug Ramsey has written about jazz for 35 years
As I write this, Dizzy Gillespie has been dead a few hours and KLON-FM is playing his recordings one after another. I'm sipping a red wine as close as I could find to the one he and I drank a lot of on a fall afternoon of listening and laughter in 1962 in his hotel room in Cleveland. I'm trying to summon the feelings of desolation and loss requisite when a friend and idol dies.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2012 | By Ernesto Lechner, Special to the Los Angeles Times
We're blessed here in L.A. Some of the most notable Latin musicians in the world call this city home: Spanish Harlem Orchestra leader Oscar Hernández, bossa nova pioneer Sergio Mendes and, more recently, Cuban trumpet player and composer Arturo Sandoval. Sandoval's presence brought some much-needed gravitas to a performance of classical and jazz fare by the Muse/ique orchestra Friday at Caltech's outdoor Beckman Mall in Pasadena. Everything has already been said about Sandoval's superb phrasing and virtuoso technique.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 2013 | By Steve Chawkins
Oscar Castro-Neves, a Brazil-born guitarist who helped to create the cool, sensuous rhythms of bossa nova and orchestrated music for movies including "L.A. Story" and "Dirty Rotten Scoundrels," has died. He was 73. Castro-Neves had cancer and died Friday in Los Angeles, his wife, Lorraine Castro-Neves, said. Castro-Neves, who was noted for both his virtuosity and his impish sense of humor, toured with jazz greats Dizzy Gillespie and Stan Getz. For 10 years, he was guitarist, musical director and vocal coach for Sergio Mendes' Brasil '66 and went on to produce albums by luminaries as varied as cellist Yo-Yo Ma and jazz harmonica player Toots Thielemans.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
Keyboardist George Duke, one of the pioneers of the jazz fusion movement that merged jazz, rock and funk in the late 1960s and 1970s, died Monday night in Los Angeles, where he was being treated for chronic lymphocytic leukemia, his record label announced. He was 67. In a career stretching over five decades, Duke collaborated with an array of other musicians, among them Frank Zappa, Miles Davis, Barry Manilow, Dizzy Gillespie, Al Jarreau, Don Ellis, Cannonball Adderly, Nancy Wilson and Joe Williams.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
Keyboardist George Duke, one of the pioneers of the jazz-fusion movement that merged jazz, rock and funk in the late 1960s and 1970s, died Monday in Los Angeles, where he was being treated for chronic lymphocytic leukemia, his record label announced. He was 67. The Northern California native was one of the leading forces in bringing jazz and rock together, genres that not only were typically separate in the 1950s and early '60s, but whose proponents often were philosophically at odds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 2013 | By Don Heckman
Paul Smith, a jazz pianist, arranger-composer and music director for stars such as Sammy Davis Jr., Anita O'Day, Mel Torme, Ella Fitzgerald, Doris Day, the Andrews Sisters, Sarah Vaughan and Rosemary Clooney, has died. He was 91. Smith died of heart failure Saturday at the Torrance Memorial Medical Center, publicist Alan Eichler said. At 6 feet 5, with hands that easily spanned the piano keyboard well beyond octaves, Smith was an impressive sight on stage. Playing with a versatility comparable to that of Oscar Peterson and a harmonic richness similar to the work of Bill Evans, he was both a brilliant soloist and an accompanist who was highly praised by the many singers with whom he performed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2013 | Elaine Woo
Sam Most, a pioneering jazz flutist who performed with a stylistically diverse range of artists, including Tommy Dorsey, Donald Byrd, Herbie Mann and Charles Mingus, died Thursday at the Kaiser Permanente Medical Center in Woodland Hills. He was 82. Most had cancer, said his brother, Bernard. Jazz historian Leonard Feather once called Most "probably the first great jazz flutist," who began his career playing with Dorsey. "Though his sound may not be 'legitimate' by orthodox standards," Feather wrote in the Los Angeles Times in 1978, "he is a rhythmically engaging performer whose peppery, witty style may take hold of a set of chord changes and never let go for a half-dozen beautifully constructed choruses.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2013 | By Elaine Woo
Jean Bach, who told the story behind a celebrated photograph of jazz luminaries in the award-winning 1994 documentary "A Great Day in Harlem," died Monday in New York City at age 94. The hourlong film chronicles an extraordinary moment in jazz history when 57 celebrated artists -- including Dizzy Gillespie, Count Basie, Coleman Hawkins, Lester Young, Gene Krupa, Bud Freeman, Thelonious Monk, Gerry Mulligan, Charlie Mingus and Sonny Rollins --...
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 1995 | Bruce Newman, Bruce Newman is an occasional contributor to Calendar
With his right hand, Quincy Jones lifts the trumpet from the dark velvet lining of the case in which it has been entombed for 20 years, then with practiced ease he puts the mouthpiece delicately to his lips. He takes a breath and holds it for a measure, thinks about the note that he would blow and the likelihood that playing it would kill him dead, pulls the horn away and holds the note in his head.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 1991 | DON HECKMAN
Dizzy Gillespie has become such a high-level cultural icon lately that it's sometimes easy to overlook the fact that he continues to be a vigorously creative jazz musician. A new CD, "The Paris All-Stars: Homage to Charlie Parker"--an all-star collection recorded on June 15, 1989--prominently features the be-bop trumpeter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 2013 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Jean Bach first laid eyes on the astonishing photograph more than a decade after its 57 subjects - all illustrious figures from jazz's golden age - posed on the steps of a Harlem brownstone in the summer of 1958. The photo eventually became Bach's obsession and the inspiration for "A Great Day in Harlem," a prize-winning, Oscar-nominated 1994 documentary that explains, through interviews and archival footage, how the magical convergence of dozens of New York jazz legends came to be. "Only Jean could have put that film together because she knew everyone," Johnny Mandel, an arranger-composer for such artists as Count Basie, Frank Sinatra and Natalie Cole who helped choose the music for the project, told The Times last week.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2012 | By Ernesto Lechner, Special to the Los Angeles Times
We're blessed here in L.A. Some of the most notable Latin musicians in the world call this city home: Spanish Harlem Orchestra leader Oscar Hernández, bossa nova pioneer Sergio Mendes and, more recently, Cuban trumpet player and composer Arturo Sandoval. Sandoval's presence brought some much-needed gravitas to a performance of classical and jazz fare by the Muse/ique orchestra Friday at Caltech's outdoor Beckman Mall in Pasadena. Everything has already been said about Sandoval's superb phrasing and virtuoso technique.
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