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Dizzy Gillespie

ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 1986 | ZAN STEWART
The promotion of jazz will be the main thrust of the National Academy of Jazz. "We're like the Country Music Assn., here simply for the betterment of our art form," said KKGO disc jockey and academy board member Chuck Niles. Plans for the academy were revealed Monday at an informal press reception and jazz performance in the Silver Screen Room at the Hyatt Hotel on the Sunset Strip.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 1988 | LEONARD FEATHER
Veteran Dizzy Gillespie watchers have long since learned what to expect, and what not to expect, in any of his concerts: plenty of patter from the paterfamilias of bop, but enough incomparable trumpet creativity to make it all worthwhile. True, at El Camino College on Saturday, he still "introduced" the men in his quintet (to one another --a tired gag that no longer draws much of a laugh).
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2001 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Conte Candoli and Pete Candoli, trumpet-playing brothers, have been jazz stars since the '40s. But there was no sign of musical wear and tear in their set at Charlie O's Friday night, delivered to an enthusiastic, packed-house crowd. Over the years, Conte--at 73, four years younger than his brother--has been primarily identified as an improvising artist, while Pete has been much admired for his dependable work as a lead trumpeter.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1987 | LEONARD FEATHER
Loa's, the Southland's newest jazz club and restaurant, opened Tuesday evening. It was one of those celebrity-heavy, television-covered first nights best summed up in three words: Quincy was there. Not surprising, perhaps, for both Quincy Jones and Ray Brown, who is musical director at the Loa, are old jazz pals and fellow alumni of the Dizzy Gillespie orchestra.
MAGAZINE
July 19, 1998
The Billy Higgins Quartet was swinging an updated arrangement of the old Nat "King" Cole standard "Nature Boy" when singer Dwight Trible took the stage.
MAGAZINE
January 26, 1986 | JANET CLAYTON, Janet Clayton is a Times staff writer.
When veteran jazz singer Ernie Andrews sings "Cabaret" on the intimate stage of Marla's Memory Lane, the words are persuading, a smooth and compelling suggestion. "The music. I come here to hear the music," says Ibelle Winston. "When I don't want to hear all this 'Hey baby, it's me and you' kind of disco-type talk, I come here, because it's mellow." Marla's Memory Lane on Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard in southwest Los Angeles has become a neighborhood refuge for serious jazz lovers.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 1985 | TONI CARDARELLA, United Press International
Disorganization almost scuttled the International Jazz Hall of Fame's second induction and awards ceremony. Some musicians from the Count Basie and Woody Herman orchestras refused to play Wednesday night when their paychecks were not available by 8 p.m, the scheduled start time of the charity event at downtown Kansas City's Music Hall. "No pay, no play," said the manager for Woody Herman, one of several jazz greats inducted into the Hall of Fame Wednesday night.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 1998 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In most ways, Sunday's Big Band Extravaganza was like the other concerts jazz director Charles "Doc" Rutherford has led at Orange Coast College in his 31 years there. Rutherford brought in notable guest professionals to join his three student orchestras: trumpeter Oscar Brashear and singers Dewey Erney and Cathy Segal-Garcia. He also chose smart and ambitious charts, music that tested the students' individual skills and their ability to play as an orchestra.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 1991 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Ambassador Foundation is another cultural institution that--like the Los Angeles Music Center and New York's Lincoln Center--is significantly expanding its jazz presentations. The nonprofit, Pasadena-based foundation, which offers mostly classical music artists at 1,300-seat Ambassador Auditorium during its September-to-June season, is spotlighting jazz for its first-ever summer event.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 1993 | LEONARD FEATHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The passing of Dizzy Gillespie will no doubt be characterized as marking the end of an era. Actually, it's more than that. By the time he reached the final decade of his life, Gillespie had become the most honored, the most respected, the most universally praised musician--not merely of the bebop era of which he had long been a symbol, but in the entire history of jazz. The music world knew him as a nonpareil trumpet virtuoso.
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