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WORLD
December 11, 2007 | Megan K. Stack, Times Staff Writer
Russian President Vladimir V. Putin anointed a successor Monday, assuring his nation that a longtime confidant who is chairman of the massive state-controlled gas company would steer the Kremlin along the path the incumbent has set for the last eight years. Dmitry Medvedev, a 42-year-old first deputy prime minister who rode Putin's coattails to the Kremlin, has long been regarded as a possible successor. If elected in March's vote, he will become Russia's youngest president.
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OPINION
September 12, 2013 | By Ilai Saltzman
For more than a decade - after he replaced Boris Yeltsin in the Kremlin and even during the time he had to serve as prime minister under his protege, Dmitry Medvedev - Russian President Vladimir Putin has systematically and consistently pursued a policy that can be labeled the Putin Doctrine. In a nutshell, Putin seeks to renew Russia's status and influence in both regional and global politics and make the Russian Federation a great power again. To achieve this goal, he challenges and subverts America's posture and interests, relying on three main components.
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WORLD
March 1, 2008 | Megan K. Stack, Times Staff Writer
Russian President Vladimir Putin has picked his successor, adorned him in the political gold of his endorsements and papered the media with his name. Now he wants to persuade voters to cast ballots in this weekend's presidential election, despite the fact that the victor is a foregone conclusion. The Kremlin is keen to draw enough voters to show that the anticipated election of Dmitry Medvedev reflects the will of the people.
NEWS
May 7, 2012 | By Paul Whitefield
He's back: Vladimir Putin was inaugurated Monday to his third term as president of Russia.  One thing about the Russians -- they like their strongmen. First the czars, then Lenin, Stalin, Khrushchev and that lovable bear of a guy, Brezhnev.  OK, so Mikhail Gorbachev fell short of true strongmanship, and likewise Boris Yeltsin.  But the latter bequeathed us Putin, and the ex-KGB guy has proved more than capable at keeping himself in power. And how does he do it?  Well, for one thing, he pays attention to the little things, as Times staffer Sergei L. Loiko described : The center of Moscow, which was rocked by clashes between the anti-Putin demonstrators and police the day before, was quiet Monday morning.
WORLD
September 25, 2011 | By Khristina Narizhnaya, Los Angeles Times
Prime Minister Vladimir Putin announced Saturday what many had long suspected: that he will run for president in the spring in the expectation of extending his grip on Russian politics for an additional six years — and perhaps longer. The announcement at a congress of the ruling United Russia party ended months of speculation about maneuvering inside the Kremlin by Putin and his protege, Dmitry Medvedev, who became president in 2008 when Putin left the office because of term limits.
WORLD
February 4, 2009 | Megan K. Stack
This is no grand reinvention, just a subtle aggregation of small, surprising gestures. Still, recent conciliatory signals from Moscow are enough to make analysts believe that Prime Minister Vladimir Putin's Russia, the cash-rich, oil-soaked country that railed against the West while shutting down political opposition at home, is groping for new footing under heavy fiscal pressure.
WORLD
November 29, 2008 | Times Wire Reports
Russia's president met with ailing Fidel Castro in Havana, winding up a visit aimed at freshening relations with Cuba and raising Moscow's profile across Latin America. Dmitry Medvedev spent several hours with President Raul Castro before meeting with his 82-year-old brother. "Everything has gone very well," Cuba's Prensa Latina quoted Medvedev as saying just before he left. "We have defined what we are going to do next, we have cleared up everything regarding credits, and in Russia we will await President Raul Castro's visit."
WORLD
March 9, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
Polish President Lech Kaczynski said he believes that the U.S. will honor its agreement to build a missile defense base in his country, adding that scrapping the project to improve ties with Russia would be an unfriendly gesture toward Poland. President Obama has acknowledged that he sent a letter to Russian counterpart Dmitry Medvedev that said curtailing Iran's pursuit of nuclear weapons would lessen the need for a U.S. missile defense system in East Europe, a project Moscow sharply opposes.
WORLD
March 9, 2008 | From Reuters
President Vladimir Putin warned the West on Saturday that it could expect no easing of Russia's foreign policy under his protege, president-elect Dmitry Medvedev. At his first meeting with a foreign leader since his election, Medvedev told visiting German Chancellor Angela Merkel he would seek continuity in foreign affairs. Putin, speaking to reporters at a joint news briefing with Merkel before the Medvedev meeting, dismissed Western hopes that his successor, to be sworn in as president in May, would strike a softer tone in foreign policy.
NEWS
May 7, 2012 | By Paul Whitefield
He's back: Vladimir Putin was inaugurated Monday to his third term as president of Russia.  One thing about the Russians -- they like their strongmen. First the czars, then Lenin, Stalin, Khrushchev and that lovable bear of a guy, Brezhnev.  OK, so Mikhail Gorbachev fell short of true strongmanship, and likewise Boris Yeltsin.  But the latter bequeathed us Putin, and the ex-KGB guy has proved more than capable at keeping himself in power. And how does he do it?  Well, for one thing, he pays attention to the little things, as Times staffer Sergei L. Loiko described : The center of Moscow, which was rocked by clashes between the anti-Putin demonstrators and police the day before, was quiet Monday morning.
WORLD
April 24, 2012 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
MOSCOW - President-elect Vladimir Putin said Tuesday that he would resign as chairman of the United Russia party after his inauguration in early May and indicated that outgoing President Dmitry Medvedev should serve as both prime minister and leader of the party. Medvedev stepped down after one term as president to allow Putin, who was serving as prime minister, to again seek the presidency, which he held for two terms before Medvedev's tenure. Putin was elected last month after a lengthy series of demonstrations in which tens of thousands of opponents took to the streets to demand an end to Putin's rule and to call United Russia "the party of swindlers and thieves.
WORLD
December 24, 2011 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
Tens of thousands of people fed up with Vladimir Putin's domination of Russian politics and his perceived arrogance jammed one of Moscow's broadest avenues for a giant protest, vowing to keep building the pressure until the longtime leader is driven from power. "Russia without Putin!" the crowd chanted Saturday as it protested alleged fraud during recent parliamentary elections that saw Prime Minister Putin's United Russia party garner nearly 50% of the vote. The demonstration, the largest in Russia's capital since the breakup of the Soviet Union in the early 1990s, was a direct rebuff of Putin and President Dmitry Medvedev, both of whom in recent days had sought to mollify critics by promising political reforms.
OPINION
October 3, 2011 | By Leon Aron
The news itself was hardly startling. It has been increasingly clear during the last year that the Regent (Vladimir Putin) would recover the throne from the Dauphin (Dmitry Medvedev). But now that it seems a certainty that Russia is headed for (at least) 12 more years of Putinism, alarm bells ought to be sounding. Why? Because by every indicator — macroeconomic, political, social — the system that Putin forged in the early 2000s is all but exhausted and is driving the country toward a dead end. It must be radically reformed, or better yet, discarded.
WORLD
October 1, 2011 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
By positioning himself to regain the presidency next year and perhaps hold the job well into the next decade, analysts say, Vladimir Putin is placing himself above what many Russians expect to be a dirty campaign for parliament this fall and tough economic reforms to follow. His protege, current President Dmitry Medvedev, not so much. Their announcement at a congress of the ruling United Russia party that the two leaders would switch positions allows Putin to protect his image as a populist and a strong leader.
WORLD
September 25, 2011 | By Khristina Narizhnaya, Los Angeles Times
Prime Minister Vladimir Putin announced Saturday what many had long suspected: that he will run for president in the spring in the expectation of extending his grip on Russian politics for an additional six years — and perhaps longer. The announcement at a congress of the ruling United Russia party ended months of speculation about maneuvering inside the Kremlin by Putin and his protege, Dmitry Medvedev, who became president in 2008 when Putin left the office because of term limits.
WORLD
August 25, 2011 | By John M. Glionna and Khristina Narizhnaya, Los Angeles Times
Reclusive North Korean leader Kim Jong Il met with Russian President Dmitry Medvedev in remote eastern Siberia on Wednesday, reportedly to discuss such issues as a natural gas pipeline, economic aid and nuclear disarmament. Kim, on his first trip to Russia in nearly a decade, is desperate for economic aid for his starving country, and Medvedev is seeking to bolster Russia's economic involvement in Northeast Asia. Moscow wants to build a pipeline through the Korean peninsula to sell Siberian natural gas to North Korea, Japan and South Korea.
OPINION
September 12, 2013 | By Ilai Saltzman
For more than a decade - after he replaced Boris Yeltsin in the Kremlin and even during the time he had to serve as prime minister under his protege, Dmitry Medvedev - Russian President Vladimir Putin has systematically and consistently pursued a policy that can be labeled the Putin Doctrine. In a nutshell, Putin seeks to renew Russia's status and influence in both regional and global politics and make the Russian Federation a great power again. To achieve this goal, he challenges and subverts America's posture and interests, relying on three main components.
WORLD
November 28, 2008 | associated press
Russian President Dmitry Medvedev visited old Cold War ally Cuba on Thursday on the last stop of a Latin American tour aimed at reviving relationships that have frayed since the Soviet Union's collapse. Medvedev arrived in Havana from Venezuela, where he met with socialist President Hugo Chavez and agreed to help the oil-rich country start a nuclear energy program. Russian officials deny that Medvedev's trip to Latin America -- traditionally considered in the U.S.
WORLD
August 24, 2011 | By John M. Glionna and Khristina Narizhnaya, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Reclusive North Korean leader Kim Jong Il traveled to Russia for the first time in nearly a decade, holding rare talks Wednesday with President Dmitry Medvedev that made progress on such issues as an energy deal and nuclear disarmament, according to Russian media reports. Meeting in remote eastern Siberia, the two leaders brought varying agendas, experts say: Kim is desperate for economic aid for his starving country while Medvedev seeks to bolster Russia's role in northeast Asia and promote its rapidly expanding economy.
WORLD
February 3, 2011 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
The investigation of last month's suicide bombing at Moscow's Domodedovo airport in which 36 people were killed and dozens more injured has exposed growing tensions between Russian President Dmitry Medvedev and Prime Minister Vladimir Putin. During a Kremlin meeting Thursday with law enforcement officials in charge of the investigation, a visibly irritated Medvedev forcefully contradicted a statement by Putin a day earlier by saying that the case was not solved and that no government official should say anything to the contrary.
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