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OPINION
April 9, 2010 | By Osagie K. Obasogie
President Obama may have given credence to a relatively new but questionable law enforcement practice that the rest of the developed world is starting to shun: taking and retaining DNA samples from individuals arrested for a crime but not convicted. That is, putting innocent people's DNA in criminal databases. During an interview with the president last month on the television program "America's Most Wanted," host John Walsh enthusiastically supported the expansion of this practice in the United States, saying, "We now have 18 states who are taking DNA upon arrest.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2013 | By Anh Do
DNA evidence helped authorities nab a suspect in a Rancho Cucamonga murder nearly 17 years after the killing, authorities said Friday. Gabriel Bencomo was arrested Thursday in the Aug. 4, 1996, shooting death of Joseph Anguiano. Bencomo allegedly targeted Anguiano in front of Anguiano's home in the 8800 block of Hermosa Avenue. Anguiano later died at Loma Linda University Medical Center. The case remained unsolved until this week's development. The sheriff's cold case team reopened the investigation in 2010, combing through more evidence, according to officials.
SCIENCE
June 5, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Junk DNA may not be so useless after all. Scientists coined the term to describe the genetic wasteland within the human genome that consists of long stretches of DNA for which there was no known function. But researchers from Harvard Medical School said Wednesday that within junk DNA in the yeast genome they had discovered a new class of gene. It does not produce a protein or enzyme to carry out its function. But when it is turned on, it regulates a neighboring gene.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2014 | By Ari Bloomekatz
Authorities say they were able to use DNA evidence to track down a man who they say brutally beat and raped a 29-year-old woman in her apartment in 2012. The woman, who has not been identified, woke up at 6 a.m. Oct. 27 in her Rowland Heights apartment as Pablo Reyes Bautista, 26, attacked her, according to the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department. The break in the case came when DNA recently entered by the suspect resulted in a match from a national database. Bautista was arrested "after an extensive manhunt" in Atwater Village, the department said.
SCIENCE
May 22, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
Researchers reported Wednesday that they had sequenced the genome of the Norway spruce, a giant evergreen native to Europe that has also been planted widely in parts of North America. Published in the journal Nature, the catalog of the tree's DNA was notable for its length. The human genome is made up of about 3 billion pairs of DNA base letters, which store all the genetic information needed to make a person. The Norway spruce genome was nearly seven times longer, at 20 billion base pairs.
NEWS
July 14, 2010 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times
"The Inborn Talent Genetic Test" promises to help parents identify their children's "hidden talents that may not be obvious at young age … it also reveals some personality traits that the child may possess, judging from his/her genetic make-up." Ever wonder if the marketing for DNA tests is getting a little out of hand? (Uh ... is the publishing industry threatened by the Internet?) Go to The Stuff of Life blog for examples of some iffy-sounding services. One of them is "The Inborn Talent Genetic Test," which "reveals the inherited and endowed inborn talents of a child scientifically from the genetic makeup of his/her DNA. The test result will therefore help parents identify their children's hidden talents that may not be obvious at young age … it also reveals some personality traits that the child may possess, judging from his/her genetic make-up."
MAGAZINE
January 17, 1993
It's interesting that people who support DNA testing are prosecutors, expert witnesses for prosecutors and people who own testing laboratories. Those who oppose it are scientists with good credentials. As a scientist--a pharmacologist--I believe that lawyers and police officers desperately want science to produce a magic bullet that will ferret out criminals. Unfortunately, many of those justice officials will grasp at any technology if they believe that it will help them win convictions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 2013 | By Ari Bloomekatz
A criminal grand jury this week indicted a former Santa Clara County supervisor for false personation after he allegedly fabricated campaign mailers to discredit a San Jose City Council candidate. George Shirakawa was indicted Monday for one felony count of false personation. The Santa Clara County district attorney's office said the false personation occurred roughly between May 1 and June 8, 2010, when he "falsely personated the campaign committee entitled 'Neighbors for Magdalena Carrasco for Council 2010.' " According to the San Jose Mercury News , Shirakawa, 51, was arrested for false personation in June, but that case was quickly mired in legal maneuvers and his pending sentencing on other charges from another case.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 2008
State Atty. Gen. Jerry Brown has tentatively decided to provide police with partial DNA matches from California's offender database that would enable authorities to search for an unknown offender's relatives when all other leads in an investigation had been exhausted. The decision, expected to be finalized this month, means California would join at least eight other states authorized to do a form of familial searching in DNA databases. The goal is to find an offender through a relative in the database who has a similar genetic profile.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1996
Inglewood police have arrested a Hawthorne man suspected of kidnapping and sexually assaulting four women waiting at the drive-through window of an El Pollo Loco restaurant during six months in 1995 and claim to have DNA evidence to link him to the crime. Darius Lamont Goodwin, 22, was charged last week with 21 counts of sexual assault, according to Inglewood Sgt. Bill Thompson.
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