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SPORTS
May 23, 1987
Scott Ostler finally wrote an article that I like, the one about Cub fever. We're everywhere . Scott. By the way, why do you all leave in the seventh inning? BOB KANE Los Angeles
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OPINION
June 24, 2001 | RUBEN MARTNEZ, Ruben Martinez is an associate editor at Pacific News Service and author of the forthcoming book "Crossing Over: A Mexican Family on the Migrant Trail."
It's all too rare, but there are those times in Los Angeles, like last Monday, when Rodney King's haunting question can be answered with an enthusiastic "Yes!" Under a hot June sun, an estimated 550,000 Angelenos gathered in the streets and in a downtown parking lot to celebrate the Lakers' repeat NBA championship and to wildly clamor for a "three-peat." The crowd was Latino and black and white and Asian. It was Armenian and Salvadoran and Korean and Lithuanian. And everybody did "get along."
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SPORTS
May 30, 1987
Scott Ostler finally wrote an article that I like, the one about Cub fever. We're everywhere , Scott. By the way, why do you all leave in the seventh inning? BOB KANE Los Angeles
NEWS
November 21, 1995 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
As trends go, body piercing has hit it big. Nose and navel rings, tongue studs and ears laced with dangling wires no longer warrant a double take. What does deserve a second look, however, are the related health risks and possible complications. Serious side effects appear rare.
BOOKS
May 14, 1989
The letter writers objecting to "Walk Like a Man" miss the point. The man disrupted the flow of her class by ignoring the instructor and expecting everyone to accommodate him. The aerobics class is a valid metaphor for our society, where many rude people do act like this. Though it's trendy to deny it, almost all of them are male. Articles like Littwin's are still useful. JUDITH M. TURCOTT Downey
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 1988
Please correct me if I'm wrong. Didn't Albert Brooks have at least as many lines and at least as much on-screen time as William Hurt in "Broadcast News"? Yet Hurt has been nominated for a best actor Oscar, while Brooks' work only merits a nod for best supporting actor. Perhaps it is true: the good-looking guys do succeed over the smart and funny ones. And they get all the great women. ERIC WILLIAMS Los Angeles
OPINION
October 18, 1987
Your editorial informs us that with the Soviet test-firing of two long-range missiles dangerously close to Hawaii, the Soviets are "surely . . . not trying to sabotage progress towards arms control and better relations with the United States." Very well, but what do such actions tell us? Are they, along with other actions such as the murder of Maj. Arthur D. Nicholson Jr. in 1985, the shooting down of KAL 007, the kidnaping of Nicholas Daniloff, the frequent intrusions of Soviet submarines into Swedish waters . . . telling us what we want to hear, or what we refuse to acknowledge?
BOOKS
December 20, 1987
Although critics will accuse Jack Miles of beating a dead Pegasus, I was glad to read the lucid, if somewhat grudging defense of poetry in his article "Nobody Needs Poetry." I'd disagree, however, with his notion that poetry is "losing out" to fiction, and that "fiction is stronger than poetry." It's like comparing tons of dynamite and a little radioactive material: Both can make a nice-size bang in the hands of an expert. Many novelists I know consider poetry as important as anatomy lessons for a medical student and routinely read it for spiritual sustenance and high delight in the power of language.
MAGAZINE
May 15, 1988
Thanks for "L.A. 2013: A Day in the Life," by Nicole Yorkin (April 3). By printing it you rendered a valuable service--confirming my feeling that L.A. is not a place in which I wish to be living in the year 2013. And what did your article portray? A society with a childish fascination for (and dependence on) technology and its "wonders," a fatalistic attitude toward overcrowding and environmental problems, and a slavish dedication to economic and political philosophies that are no longer supportable.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1986 | COLMAN ANDREWS
A number of readers have written to me to thank me for my recent remarks on restaurant telephone rudeness and to share further examples of such rudeness with me. I won't cite specifics here, since at least some of these reader complaints describe situations that sound as if they might well have been ambiguous and others mention behavior that doesn't sound exactly rude to me (e.g.
NEWS
August 21, 1995 | KATHLEEN KELLEHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"The good die early, the bad die late," wrote poet Daniel Defoe in 1696. Nearly 300 years later, Billy Joel howled the same thing in his song "Only the Good Die Young." But a groundbreaking longevity study, spanning 70 years, debunks that cherished adage. Instead, it found that nice, conscientious people tend to live longer than the insolent and brutish.
NEWS
May 4, 1995 | JEFF KASS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In some wealthy cities, the security fence, guard service and live-in caretaker planned for the house on Pine Tree Lane might not attract attention. But this house is in Rolling Hills, a gated community of 1,871 on the Palos Verdes Peninsula where outsiders can enter only with the permission of residents or the homeowners association.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 1994 | BENJAMIN EPSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The cellist lives in Oxford, the pianist in Milan and the violinist in New Jersey. Is this any way to run a trio? "It's even more complicated than that," said David Golub, the Golub-Kaplan-Carr Trio's pianist, in a phone interview from Italy; Mark Kaplan is violinist and Colin Carr is cellist. "Oxford is technically Colin's residence, but he spends more time in Boston. I also have an apartment in New York. At least Mark is stationary in New Jersey. "But it's always been like that."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1994 | BUDDY SEIGAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Old-school soul singing is not dead--not if Malford Milligan has anything to do with it. The front man with blues-and-soul-rock band Storyville, Milligan brings a passion to his singing style rarely heard since the heyday of Otis Redding and Sam Cooke. The latest import from the talent-rich Austin, Tex., music scene, Storyville performs Saturday at the Coach House. Milligan's cohorts are Lone Star State heavies Tommy Shannon (bass), Chris Layton (drums) and guitarists David Grissom and David Holt.
NEWS
April 1, 1994 | DEBRA GENDEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Platinum hair started turning up in European fashion magazines about six months ago. Worn close to the head or long and loose, these ivory locks looked unnatural . . . but nice. Now we're seeing them all over town. Even Joe Pesci's a golden boy in "Jimmy Hollywood." Diane Keaton recently insisted that her longtime hairdresser, Jonathan Gale at Juan Juan in Beverly Hills, turn her into a towhead. As did actress Kate Capshaw and super-model Vendela.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1994 | JACK MATHEWS, Jack Matthews is the film critic of Newsday and New York Newsday
You've seen it many times. A star, on stage to present an award, is reading from prepared material when he suddenly leans forward, squints and begins speaking haltingly, as if the lines on the TelePrompTer are so unutterably stupid, his mind is too embarrassed to relay them to his mouth. As awkward as it may seem, the moment is actually a slick piece of acting, a little body performance pleading, "Don't blame me, I didn't write this crap!"
BUSINESS
June 16, 1985
Regarding "Tax Reform May End Up as Tax Cut" (Times Board of Economists, June 4), columnist Don R. Conlan says that the idea that corporations should pay taxes is "one of the most specious of traditional left-wing ideas." "Sorry, folks," he says, "corporations do not pay taxes--only people pay taxes. Corporations are a conduit, nothing more, nothing less." But it is Conlan who is being specious here. By legal definition, a corporation is a "person"--a fictitious person, true, but a person nonetheless as far as the law is concerned.
BUSINESS
August 14, 1986 | DEBRA WHITEFIELD
QUESTION: My wife and I are having an argument over food habits and we're hoping that you can settle it. I say young professionals spend more money eating out than they do on groceries. She says everybody--no matter what age--spends more on groceries than they do on meals away from home. Is there any way to find out who's right?--L. V. ANSWER: The beauty of statistics is that they can be manipulated to make everyone a winner. And so it is in this case.
NEWS
August 17, 1993
Drip. Wipe. Drip. Wipe. That's the lovely sound of sweat once it has made its way from the 2.5 million or so sweat glands in your body to the surface of your skin. Look at sweat--your body's central air conditioning system--as a necessary evil. Especially as it drenches your suit while you sit in traffic on the San Bernardino on your way to a 2 p.m. interview and the car clock indicates that it is now 2:14. Drip-wipe-drip-wipe-drip-wipe. Like waves to the shore, sweat cannot be stopped.
NEWS
August 17, 1993 | KATHLEEN DOHENY
Think of it as central air conditioning for the body, especially during these dog days. If not for the impressive network of sweat glands in your body--the average person boasts 2 million to 3 million--maintaining a healthy body temperature would be impossible. "Animals pant, humans sweat," says Dr. Stephen Ross, UCLA assistant clinical professor of family medicine on staff at Santa Monica Hospital Medical Center. Sweat is a major help in controlling the body's internal temperature, he says.
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