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March 15, 1991
Doc Pomus, a wheelchair-bound songwriter who penned more than two dozen hits for Elvis Presley and scores for other popular groups during a 40-year career, died Thursday in Manhattan. He had been suffering from lung cancer, said a representative of his publishing company, BMI. He was 65. Either alone or with his cousin Mort Shuman, Pomus wrote such hits for Elvis Presley as "Little Sister," "Viva Las Vegas," and "Suspicion."
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2013 | By Hugh Hart
Elvis. Aretha. The Beatles. These are the titans. Jerome Felder, Spooner Oldham and Freda Kelly? They're the supporting players. Following on last year's Oscar-winning Sixto Rodriguez documentary, "Searching for Sugarman," a fresh set of nonfiction films this year focused on low-profile talents whose stories are every bit as fascinating as their more famous compatriots. Leading the charge this year: Oscar shortlisted documentary "20 Feet From Stardom. " Financed by the late record executive Gil Friesen, "Stardom" offers a bittersweet group portrait of half a dozen background singers who helped define landmark recordings by Ray Charles, Ike and Tina Turner, Rolling Stones, Sting and Stevie Wonder but failed to carve out comparable solo careers for themselves.  FULL COVERAGE: Oscars 2014 At the outset, director Morgan Neville faced a daunting challenge.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Elvis Presley called him up in the middle of the night to thank him for a song. John Lennon went to a banquet just so he could sit next to him. Dion said meeting with him was like "being inside a cubicle with a piano and a genius. " His name was Jerome Felder, but fame reached him under a pseudonym, Doc Pomus. If you care at all about the early days of rock 'n' roll, you either know who Doc Pomus was or count one of his songs as among your favorites: "This Magic Moment," "Save the Last Dance for Me," "Lonely Avenue," "Little Sister," "Viva Las Vegas," "Can't Get Used to Losing You," "A Teenager in Love.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Elvis Presley called him up in the middle of the night to thank him for a song. John Lennon went to a banquet just so he could sit next to him. Dion said meeting with him was like "being inside a cubicle with a piano and a genius. " His name was Jerome Felder, but fame reached him under a pseudonym, Doc Pomus. If you care at all about the early days of rock 'n' roll, you either know who Doc Pomus was or count one of his songs as among your favorites: "This Magic Moment," "Save the Last Dance for Me," "Lonely Avenue," "Little Sister," "Viva Las Vegas," "Can't Get Used to Losing You," "A Teenager in Love.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 1992 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES POP MUSIC CRITIC
Most pop fans may have probably heard more in the last two weeks about the late Doc Pomus than they did during the late songwriter's five decades on the pop, rock and R&B scenes. Pomus was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame last week in recognition of writing or co-writing hits for such artists as Elvis Presley ("Little Sister" and "Viva Las Vegas"), Ray Charles ("Lonely Avenue"), the Coasters ("Young Blood"), the Drifters ("Save the Last Dance for Me") and Dion ("A Teenager in Love").
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 1995 | DENNIS HUNT
*** Various artists, "Till the Night Is Gone: A Tribute to Doc Pomus," Rhino. Pomus was a songwriting marvel--able to turn out lightweight rock hits (Fabian's "Turn Me Loose"), yet gifted enough to write such memorable ballads as the Drifters' "Save the Last Dance for Me."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2011 | By Amy Kaufman, Los Angeles Times
Ever since the 1970s, well-to-do hippies have flocked to Laurel Canyon, the tree-lined neighborhood perched high in the hills above Los Angeles. Aside from a country store, a cozy restaurant whose name means "peace" in Italian and a mass of post-and-beam houses, there isn't actually much to the area other than the omnipresent sense that something magical once took place there. Forty years ago, Laurel Canyon was home to a collective of artists who wrote some of their most famous music while living there.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2013 | By Hugh Hart
Elvis. Aretha. The Beatles. These are the titans. Jerome Felder, Spooner Oldham and Freda Kelly? They're the supporting players. Following on last year's Oscar-winning Sixto Rodriguez documentary, "Searching for Sugarman," a fresh set of nonfiction films this year focused on low-profile talents whose stories are every bit as fascinating as their more famous compatriots. Leading the charge this year: Oscar shortlisted documentary "20 Feet From Stardom. " Financed by the late record executive Gil Friesen, "Stardom" offers a bittersweet group portrait of half a dozen background singers who helped define landmark recordings by Ray Charles, Ike and Tina Turner, Rolling Stones, Sting and Stevie Wonder but failed to carve out comparable solo careers for themselves.  FULL COVERAGE: Oscars 2014 At the outset, director Morgan Neville faced a daunting challenge.
NEWS
November 4, 1991 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Composer and singer Mort Shuman, who wrote hits for American and French stars, including Elvis Presley, and also produced the musical "Jacques Brel Is Alive and Well and Living in Paris," died early Sunday in a London hospital, his agent said. He was 52. The announcement in Paris by Charley Marouani did not list a cause of death. Shuman underwent a liver operation last spring and was hospitalized again two weeks ago.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2011 | By Amy Kaufman, Los Angeles Times
Ever since the 1970s, well-to-do hippies have flocked to Laurel Canyon, the tree-lined neighborhood perched high in the hills above Los Angeles. Aside from a country store, a cozy restaurant whose name means "peace" in Italian and a mass of post-and-beam houses, there isn't actually much to the area other than the omnipresent sense that something magical once took place there. Forty years ago, Laurel Canyon was home to a collective of artists who wrote some of their most famous music while living there.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 1995 | DENNIS HUNT
*** Various artists, "Till the Night Is Gone: A Tribute to Doc Pomus," Rhino. Pomus was a songwriting marvel--able to turn out lightweight rock hits (Fabian's "Turn Me Loose"), yet gifted enough to write such memorable ballads as the Drifters' "Save the Last Dance for Me."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 1992 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES POP MUSIC CRITIC
Most pop fans may have probably heard more in the last two weeks about the late Doc Pomus than they did during the late songwriter's five decades on the pop, rock and R&B scenes. Pomus was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame last week in recognition of writing or co-writing hits for such artists as Elvis Presley ("Little Sister" and "Viva Las Vegas"), Ray Charles ("Lonely Avenue"), the Coasters ("Young Blood"), the Drifters ("Save the Last Dance for Me") and Dion ("A Teenager in Love").
NEWS
March 15, 1991
Doc Pomus, a wheelchair-bound songwriter who penned more than two dozen hits for Elvis Presley and scores for other popular groups during a 40-year career, died Thursday in Manhattan. He had been suffering from lung cancer, said a representative of his publishing company, BMI. He was 65. Either alone or with his cousin Mort Shuman, Pomus wrote such hits for Elvis Presley as "Little Sister," "Viva Las Vegas," and "Suspicion."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1987 | DON WALLER
* * * "STRANGE WEATHER." Marianne Faithfull. Island. If a very hip, late set at an especially psychotic cabaret is your particular cup of espresso, you're sure to enjoy this mondo depresso mini-masterwork from veteran chanteuse/cult heroine Marianne Faithfull.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 1998 | Richard Cromelin, Richard Cromelin writes about pop music for Calendar
Is there something in the millennial air that's driving pop singers of fiftysomething vintage back to their roots? First Rod Stewart comes swaggering out with an effort to recapture his old rocker's joie de vivre, and a few weeks later Linda Ronstadt releases an album that's being touted as a return to her classic '70s country-rock form.
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