Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsDoctor
IN THE NEWS

Doctor

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1986
The matter of physicians' fees and health-care costs is certainly a discussable and debatable subject. But I think you oversimplify and render your readers an injustice in your editorial (April 14), "Shopping for Doctors," when you equate shopping for a doctor with shopping for a major purchase like a home or a car. I imagine you can compare one automobile with another and make a decision based on price because machines are machines, wheel for wheel, engine for engine, gas consumption for gas consumption, color for color, etc. There are so many variables among houses--condition, location, (landfill vs. solid ground)
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1995
Re: "Irvine Fertility Doctor Is the Life of the Party" (Oct. 30). Having read all the negative publicity recently about fertility doctors, I'm pleased The Times found the time to profile one of most truly remarkable men I've ever met. Having been a patient of Dr. [Lawrence] Werlin's, I can attest to his remarkable level of caring and professionalism toward people in a medical field where patient emotions demand an exacting toll on a daily basis. In a society where role models are sorely lacking, it is appropriate that a man of Dr. Werlin's character is associated with the miracle of life.
NEWS
May 24, 2012 | By Kim Geiger
WASHINGTON -- In response to the conviction in a Pakistani court of the doctor who helped the United States track down Osama bin Laden, the Senate Appropriations Committee voted Thursday to cut aid to Pakistanby by $1 million for every year of the doctor's sentence. Shakeel Afridi, the doctor who sought to collect DNA to help verify for the CIA that bin Laden was at a compound in Abbottabad, was convicted of high treason and sentenced to 33 years in prison. The committee agreed by a vote of 30-0 to cut $33 million in aid to Pakistan, according to the Associated Press.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2013 | By Scott Collins
This just goes to show that if you give "Doctor Who" fans something they want to see, they'll come out for it, even on a Sunday afternoon in August. BBC America's "Doctor Who Live: The Next Doctor" -- a 2 p.m. special formally introducing Scottish actor Peter Capaldi as the next star of the perennial sci-fi series -- was the No. 1 telecast Sunday across social media (not including sports).  It didn't do too badly in the TV ratings, either. "Doctor Who Live" scored 895,000 total viewers, according to Nielsen.
HEALTH
June 7, 2010 | By Tammy Worth, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Stories of emergency rooms pushed to capacity and wait times at physicians' offices have become legendary. Now the passage of healthcare reform — potentially funneling 30 million new people into an already-packed system — has some groups warning that the nation will soon see a shortage of doctors. The Assn. of American Medical Colleges has warned of a deficiency of up to 125,000 doctors by 2025. And it isn't the only group voicing concerns. The Health Resources and Services Administration, a federal agency that works to improve healthcare access for the uninsured, has projected that the supply of primary-care physicians will be adequate through 2020, at which point there will be a deficit of 65,560 physicians.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2014 | By Scott Glover
A Santa Barbara doctor accused of illegally prescribing painkillers and other potent narcotics to patients who had no legitimate medical need pleaded guilty Thursday to federal drug dealing charges. Julio Diaz, 65, had been awaiting trial when he pleaded guilty to 11 counts of drug dealing in U.S. District Court in Santa Ana. Diaz was taken into custody after entering the plea, said Asst. U.S. Atty. Ann Luotto Wolf. He is scheduled to be sentenced in June. The doctor's attorney, Michael Guisti, declined comment.
WORLD
February 14, 2010
During a visit to the Tehran military courthouse one day last fall, Hossein and Hamid spotted the doctor. Memories from their five days at Kahrizak prison came flooding back. Prisoners seeking help were handed a few aspirin and told to go away. When they asked for bandages, the doctor struck some lightly with a club. One inmate had been beaten so badly on his feet that his toes were swollen and infected and he couldn't walk properly. He arranged for an appointment with the doctor, who told him, "Get lost before I beat you up," according to Hossein, who said he didn't even bother asking for help for his own injuries.
BUSINESS
April 11, 2013 | By Chad Terhune
Insurance giant Anthem Blue Cross has reached a confidential settlement with a Porter Ranch doctor who had already won $3.8 million in compensatory damages from the company at a trial this week. The agreement reached late Thursday keeps a Los Angeles jury from levying additional punitive damages against the company Friday, when the trial was scheduled to resume. The 12-person panel ruled Monday that Anthem had improperly barred Jeffrey Nordella, an urgent-care and family-practice doctor, from the company's preferred-provider network in 2010.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|