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October 23, 1998 | JEFF GOTTLIEB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Olympic sprint champion Florence Griffith Joyner died after suffering an epileptic seizure, according to autopsy results released Thursday, and her family and friends say they hope the findings will put to rest rumors that drug use contributed to her death. Griffith Joyner died last month in her sleep at age 38. Her husband, Al Joyner, bitterly criticized those who suggested that she took performance-enhancing drugs.
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HEALTH
April 25, 2014 | Valerie J. Nelson
Far older than most of the regulars at his weekly South Bay swing-dancing class, the World War II veteran invariably shuffles in, sidles up to his instructor and unwittingly gives voice to a scientific truth: "I'm here for my anti-aging therapy and happiness treatment. " Dancing has long been lauded as a great physical workout, yet research has increasingly shown that social dancing, such as swing, a lively, improvisational style that requires rapid-fire decision-making in concert with a partner, is also beneficial to both mind and spirit.
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BUSINESS
October 7, 1993 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 120 investigators and prosecutors looking into workers' compensation fraud in Southern California served search warrants Wednesday at 31 sites, including the homes and offices of a string of doctors and lawyers suspected of paying illicit kickbacks. The investigation is one of several major workers' compensation fraud probes launched by authorities in the region since the beginning of last year.
WORLD
April 24, 2014 | By Hashmat Baktash and Shashank Bengali
KABUL, Afghanistan - Three American doctors were killed Thursday when an Afghan police officer opened fire inside one of Kabul's leading hospitals in the latest deadly attack aimed at foreigners in Afghanistan. The shooting occurred at Cure International Hospital of Kabul, a 100-bed hospital that specializes in surgery and maternal and child health and treats 37,000 patients annually, the vast majority of them Afghans. The facility is run by Cure, a Christian medical charity that runs hospitals and health programs in 29 countries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1994 | JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Northridge doctor and three other physicians have been charged with paying illegal kickbacks to a medical referral firm that is under investigation for workers compensation fraud. The physicians allegedly paid for patient referrals from L.A. Management, a former Sherman Oaks firm under investigation for possibly paying kickbacks to get patients from companies that process workers' compensation claims for some employers and insurers. The investigation of L.A.
NEWS
December 4, 1989 | From Associated Press
A 26-year-old woman underwent what doctors said was the world's first heart-liver-kidney transplant Sunday. Cindy Martin of Archbald was listed in critical condition Sunday night, considered normal after a transplant operation, said Lisa Rossi, a spokeswoman for University-Presbyterian Hospital. The operation began at 7:35 p.m. Saturday and ended at 5 p.m. Sunday, Rossi said.
NEWS
December 6, 1988 | JOHN PEKKANEN
I went into an anesthesiology residency and began my love affair with Fentanyl, a narcotic-anesthetic that we use all the time. I saw how great it made patients feel. I tried it intravenously. With Fentanyl, if you use it once, you are hooked. It removed every trace of anxiety and tension I had felt. But I never became so high that I felt detached; I felt efficient and in control. My mistake was in thinking I would always feel this way. Getting Fentanyl was ridiculously easy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1994 | JULIE TAMAKI and ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER and TIMES STAFF WRITER
A former Brentwood doctor was sentenced to 13 years in prison Monday for sexually assaulting four female patients, including two women who were patients at a Panorama City clinic. Superior Court Judge Charles Horan imposed the sentence on Yahya Lavi, 56, during a hearing in Downtown Los Angeles, despite pleas by prosecutors to impose a tougher 37-year prison term. Deputy Dist. Atty.
BUSINESS
May 24, 1990 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Corona del Mar podiatrist is struggling to get his foot in the door at a prestigious medical building complex in Newport Beach, complaining that the landlord is discriminating against his profession. Ivar Roth, 36, describes himself as "very conservative" and said he fits right into the traditional Newport Beach physician community. "I follow the rules," he said. "I don't make trouble."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 1992 | KENNETH J. GARCIA and SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A wealthy Century City physician, who pleaded guilty to 25 felony fraud and theft charges after bilking insurance carriers of up to $8 million, claimed he was stressed out after his indictments and has been receiving $266 a week in state disability payments. On Thursday, Dist. Atty. Ira Reiner said Dr. Gershon W.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | By Sheri Linden
As in many a thriller, the helpful stranger in "The German Doctor" turns out to be a monster. In this case, he's no run-of-the-mill sadist but Josef Mengele, Auschwitz's Angel of Death, and he finds prime subjects for experimentation in an Argentine family. The drama by LucĂ­a Puenzo, adapting her novel "Wakolda," is a credible imagining of a brief period in Mengele's South American exile. The what-if conceit is intriguing enough not to be undone by increasingly heavy-handed symbolism.
BUSINESS
April 22, 2014 | By Chad Terhune
University of California regents agreed to pay $10 million to the former chairman of UCLA's orthopedic surgery department, who had alleged that the well-known medical school allowed doctors to take industry payments that may have compromised patient care. The settlement reached Tuesday in Los Angeles County Superior Court came just before closing arguments were due to begin in a whistleblower-retaliation case brought by Dr. Robert Pedowitz, 54, a surgeon who was recruited to UCLA in 2009 to run the orthopedic surgery department.
NATIONAL
April 18, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
Two Texas doctors who had been performing abortions for more than three decades lost their legal ability to do so at the end of March when their new hospital revoked their privileges. This week, a judge temporarily reinstated their positions. But the doctors face an April 30 court hearing to see if that temporary order will remain in place. The abortion case, like many others in Texas at the moment, was sparked by legislation passed last year that placed significant limits on who can perform abortions and where.
BUSINESS
April 17, 2014 | David Lazarus
Dr. Theodore Corwin, a plastic surgeon in Thousand Oaks for the last 30 years, has had run-ins with insurers before, but never one so aggravating - and pointless - as this. A 26-year-old woman recently came to his office complaining of back, neck and shoulder pain, as well as numbness in her hands and arms, resulting from her unusually ample bust. She's 5-foot-6, not overweight, Corwin said. She wanted a breast reduction. "There seemed to be no question that her pain and numbness was caused by her carrying this excessive weight," Corwin told me. "It seemed like a straightforward diagnosis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2014 | Hailey Branson-Potts
In so many ways, the paths of Dr. A. Richard Grossman and firefighters crossed. When firefighters pulled badly burned people out of the flames, they took them straight to Grossman, a plastic and reconstructive surgeon who pioneered the comprehensive care of burn patients. When the firefighters themselves were burned on the job, they went to him too. On Sunday, hundreds of uniformed firefighters, nurses and former patients gathered beneath the burning flame of the Los Angeles Fire Department's Fallen Firefighters Memorial in Hollywood to honor the doctor's life.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2014 | By Steve Chawkins
Charles F. Farthing, a physician who was at the forefront of care for HIV/AIDS patients and who drew attention to the need for an AIDS vaccine by announcing his willingness to inject himself, has died. He was 60. Farthing, who collapsed in a Hong Kong taxi April 5, had a heart attack, family members said in an announcement. Farthing was chief of medicine for the Los Angeles-based AIDS Healthcare Foundation from 1994 to 2007. He was planning to return to the foundation in June as director of treatment programs in the 32 countries outside the U.S. where it provides services.
NEWS
August 24, 1995 | BARRY SIEGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the moment China Leonard met Dr. Joseph Verbrugge Jr., she didn't like him. They were in a pre-op room at Denver's St. Joseph Hospital, where China's son Richard, 8, was being prepared for minor ear surgery. It was 7:15 a.m. on July 8, 1993. Verbrugge, the scheduled anesthesiologist, had rushed in late, acting bristly and abrupt. "Well, are you nervous?" Verbrugge demanded of Richard. Richard didn't look up from the television. He'd been uncommonly subdued all morning.
SPORTS
June 27, 2010 | Jerry Crowe
Even those who cursed his name in the 1970s would empathize with Conrad Dobler in his current plight. The man Sports Illustrated once dubbed "pro football's dirtiest player" -- on its cover, no less -- Dobler lives a life of not-so-quiet desperation, "a never-ending series of setbacks and worst-case scenarios," as one writer aptly described it. Not quite 60 years old, his body ravaged by a decade in the NFL trenches, the three-time Pro...
NATIONAL
April 14, 2014 | By John M. Glionna
OVERLAND PARK, Kan. - Standing at the lectern, Mindy Corporon calmly spoke about love in the face of hatred, describing how two people so central to her life - her father and her son - were shot to death by a gunman who police say is a white supremacist bent on violence. Her voice steady, she described arriving Sunday afternoon moments after the attacker, whom police identified as Frazier Glenn Cross, opened fire in the parking lot of the Jewish Community Center here, a shooting rampage that took the lives of three people, including a woman outside a nearby Jewish senior center.
OPINION
April 13, 2014
Re "How Medicare pays MDs," Editorial, April 10 It's wrong to blame physicians for Medicare's fiscal woes. Doing away with fee-for-service as a way to "reward quality and efficiency" is unworkable. The federal government could never figure that out. The small, shriveled carrot it would offer as the "reward" would be an insult to the medical profession. Medicare's problems, as evidenced by the testimony of physicians fingered in the recent revelations, have to do with outrageous drug, laboratory and facility charges.
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