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Doctors Israel

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January 23, 1989 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
In the halls of Jerusalem hospitals, physicians whispered about the case of a 14-year-old Palestinian boy suffering from leukemia who was denied admission to an Israeli hospital because the government would not pay for a bone marrow transplant, the expensive treatment he needed. The boy, named Samir, wasted away and died in a West Bank hospital, physicians and newspapers said. Several doctors vowed that it would never happen again. It probably has.
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NEWS
January 23, 1989 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
In the halls of Jerusalem hospitals, physicians whispered about the case of a 14-year-old Palestinian boy suffering from leukemia who was denied admission to an Israeli hospital because the government would not pay for a bone marrow transplant, the expensive treatment he needed. The boy, named Samir, wasted away and died in a West Bank hospital, physicians and newspapers said. Several doctors vowed that it would never happen again. It probably has.
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NEWS
November 13, 1986
Michael Shirman, 32, is too sick with leukemia to receive a bone marrow transplant from his sister, who battled for nine months to leave the Soviet Union to try to save his life, according to doctors at Israel's Kaplan Medical Center, south of Tel Aviv. "He is in a critical condition," said a doctor, who declined to be identified. The statement came the same day that doctors discovered that the bone marrow of Shirman's sister, Inessa Fleurova, 37, is compatible with his.
NEWS
April 27, 1988 | United Press International
Thousands of Palestinians--far more than Israel claims--have suffered serious injuries in beatings by Israeli soldiers in the occupied West Bank and Gaza Strip, a doctors' peace group charged Tuesday. Physicians for Human Rights, which sent a fact-finding delegation of four doctors to Israel for eight days in February, also said that medical relief efforts are being hampered by curfews and under-funding in the occupied territories.
NEWS
May 5, 2002 | SETH HETTENA, ASSOCIATED PRESS
On a gray April morning, a Mexican boy and his mother sit in a doctor's office in San Diego. A bandage covers the boy's left eye. His right eye, as blue as the deep ocean, has a vacant look. A birth defect left the 16-year-old unable to see much beyond a few inches. His corneas, the clear tissue at the front of his eyes, are clouded over. It's as though Israel Cortez Guzman always looks at the world through a dirty, frosted window pane. Today, the doctor tells him, that may change.
NEWS
March 26, 1998 | TERENCE MONMANEY, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Imagine Jack the Ripper becoming prime minister, or the deadly Ebola virus turning into a boon to human health. Such a mind-boggling reversal of fortune is underway for one of the most horrifying medications of modern times: thalidomide. The drug was notorious for causing thousands of birth defects and infant deaths in the 1950s and early '60s in Europe and Canada.
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