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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1992 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a dream that the years could not fade. Jean Forman had wanted to be a doctor for as long as she could remember, even though she grew up during a time when, as she put it, women were told to "leave the doctoring to men." On Sunday, the 51-year-old Long Beach woman completed a decade-long journey to become a physician. As her husband, children and grandchildren watched, Forman received her diploma from the USC School of Medicine.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2000 | JOHNATHON E. BRIGGS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 45-year-old Mexican pediatrician filed a $10-million lawsuit Thursday against the Marshalls department store chain alleging that she was brutalized by a security guard who believed she was trying to steal an $8 wallet from the company's Torrance store. Olga Veronica Flores, chief of pediatrics at the Hospital Infantil de Mexico, suffered humiliation, emotional distress and a fractured right wrist during the Feb. 23 confrontation at the Del Amo Fashion Center, according to the suit.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1997 | Cecilia Rasmussen
She was ravaged by tuberculosis, plagued by sexism and shunned even--perhaps especially--by colleagues. But Rebecca Lee Dorsey persevered to become a pioneer: the world's first female endocrinologist and the first woman physician to practice in Los Angeles. Throughout a medical career that spanned almost seven decades, according to her unpublished memoirs, Dorsey delivered 5,000 babies, among them future California governor and chief justice of the Supreme Court Earl Warren.
NEWS
March 10, 2000 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
One measure of how times have changed, Dr. Florence Haseltine says wryly, is that she hasn't had to hit a man in years. During her medical training a generation ago, Haseltine out-toughed the tough guys. When colleagues taunted or slighted her, she sliced them with her wit. An especially cheeky comment was answered with a punch or shove. "I picked up [one male instructor] and threw him on the ground," said Haseltine, one of seven in her medical school class 30 years ago.
NEWS
June 4, 1991 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A leading woman neurosurgeon and tenured professor resigned from Stanford Medical School, citing a pattern of sexism and prompting the medical school dean to acknowledge Monday that some men at the prestigious school are "insensitive" toward women. Dr. Frances Conley, 50, one of the few female brain surgeons in the nation, said male faculty members have used slides of Playboy centerfolds to "spice up" lectures.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1995 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, Times Staff Writer
Practicing medicine anywhere these days can be a big challenge. But for the relatively rare physician who works in the inner city, such as Dr. Carol Jennings, the challenges go off the charts. A 60-year-old man who recently walked into her clinic, the South Central Family Health Center at 45th and Main streets, illustrates one dimension of the problem. He had not seen a doctor for years and told Jennings he wanted a checkup.
NEWS
October 22, 1987
The state Fair Employment and Housing Commission has admitted that it has no power to stop discrimination against most doctors at hospitals who must go to court with complaints of bias. The panel voted 4 to 0 in San Francisco to dismiss, for lack of jurisdiction, a sex-discrimination complaint by physician Charles Gilman, who said Children's Hospital in San Diego told him in 1983 that only women would be hired to treat sexually abused children.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 1988 | From Times staff and wire reports
The number of women faculty members at the nation's medical schools has grown 73% in a decade, but women doctors still rarely make it to the top ranks of academia, a study shows. The author of the report recommended that medical schools adopt more flexible rules so that women can both raise families and compete for the most prestigious positions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1991 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dr. Lillian Seitsive has spent a lifetime bucking the odds. The daughter of Jewish immigrants who fled the pogroms in Russia, Seitsive entered medical school in 1927, a time when women typically became housewives or teachers. Still, she persevered. In time, she became a founder physician of Northridge Hospital, a member of the World Health Organization and an active supporter of medical facilities in Israel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 1999 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every day for the past 100 years, babies have been born in Los Angeles. They never stopped coming--not even during the worst of times. Dr. Sakaye Shigekawa, 86, delivered nearly 20,000 of them. She remembers the ones who arrived kicking and screaming into the barbed wire confines of a detention camp. She remembers those born at downtown's Japanese Hospital, built for Japanese Americans when other hospitals would not accept them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2000 | CECILIA RASMUSSEN
She was one of a handful of determined Los Angeles women who overcame personal hardships and the 19th century's endemic sexism to win a place in the medical profession. In fact, Rose Talbot Bullard's perseverance against an all-male medical establishment ultimately made her the Los Angeles County Medical Assn.'s first female president. It was a measure of her singular achievement that no other woman would fill that post for another 90 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 1999 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every day for the past 100 years, babies have been born in Los Angeles. They never stopped coming--not even during the worst of times. Dr. Sakaye Shigekawa, 86, delivered nearly 20,000 of them. She remembers the ones who arrived kicking and screaming into the barbed wire confines of a detention camp. She remembers those born at downtown's Japanese Hospital, built for Japanese Americans when other hospitals would not accept them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1997 | Cecilia Rasmussen
She was ravaged by tuberculosis, plagued by sexism and shunned even--perhaps especially--by colleagues. But Rebecca Lee Dorsey persevered to become a pioneer: the world's first female endocrinologist and the first woman physician to practice in Los Angeles. Throughout a medical career that spanned almost seven decades, according to her unpublished memoirs, Dorsey delivered 5,000 babies, among them future California governor and chief justice of the Supreme Court Earl Warren.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1995 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, Times Staff Writer
Practicing medicine anywhere these days can be a big challenge. But for the relatively rare physician who works in the inner city, such as Dr. Carol Jennings, the challenges go off the charts. A 60-year-old man who recently walked into her clinic, the South Central Family Health Center at 45th and Main streets, illustrates one dimension of the problem. He had not seen a doctor for years and told Jennings he wanted a checkup.
NEWS
April 13, 1993 | STEVE EMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 31-year-old woman, we'll call her Terry, said she goes to woman doctors exclusively. Wouldn't think of going to a man. Why? "You want it blunt? Men don't have cramps. I say, 'This is killing me. Gimme a prescription,' and he says, 'Aw, it's not that bad.' They don't know. "I've had male doctors in the past, but I think it's the empathy. You just feel you can relate to a woman doctor better." A group of women doctors in Orange County is betting there are lots of women like Terry out here.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1992 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a dream that the years could not fade. Jean Forman had wanted to be a doctor for as long as she could remember, even though she grew up during a time when, as she put it, women were told to "leave the doctoring to men." On Sunday, the 51-year-old Long Beach woman completed a decade-long journey to become a physician. As her husband, children and grandchildren watched, Forman received her diploma from the USC School of Medicine.
NEWS
March 10, 2000 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
One measure of how times have changed, Dr. Florence Haseltine says wryly, is that she hasn't had to hit a man in years. During her medical training a generation ago, Haseltine out-toughed the tough guys. When colleagues taunted or slighted her, she sliced them with her wit. An especially cheeky comment was answered with a punch or shove. "I picked up [one male instructor] and threw him on the ground," said Haseltine, one of seven in her medical school class 30 years ago.
NEWS
May 20, 1992 | HARRY NELSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Patients often complain that their doctor is distant, lacks empathy and is unwilling to listen to them for longer than 10 seconds. Is it possible that the rapidly growing number of women physicians may help correct an impression set largely by a male-dominated medical profession? By the year 2010, the American Medical Assn. projects that 30% of all doctors will be female and the majority of them will be family practitioners.
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