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NEWS
August 17, 2011 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
Talk to a doctor about medical malpractice, and he or she is likely to tell you this: Patients don't necessarily sue because a doctor made a mistake, they sue because they got a bad outcome. A report released today by the New England Journal of Medicine bears this out.  It finds that in a given year, 7.4% of doctors (on average) get sued by patients, but only 20% of those claims (on average) result in some sort of payment. Researchers from Harvard, USC and the Rand Corp. in Santa Monica examined malpractice claims against nearly 41,000 doctors who were covered by a single insurance company from 1991 to 2005.
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SPORTS
June 27, 2010 | Jerry Crowe
Even those who cursed his name in the 1970s would empathize with Conrad Dobler in his current plight. The man Sports Illustrated once dubbed "pro football's dirtiest player" -- on its cover, no less -- Dobler lives a life of not-so-quiet desperation, "a never-ending series of setbacks and worst-case scenarios," as one writer aptly described it. Not quite 60 years old, his body ravaged by a decade in the NFL trenches, the three-time Pro...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 2011 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
Only 24 weeks into her pregnancy, Haydee Ibarra's doctors told her that her baby wasn't getting the blood and oxygen she needed to survive. If she stayed inside the womb, the baby would certainly die. If she was born, her chances weren't much better and she could face a lifetime of health complications. Ibarra, 22, and Yovani Guido, 24, implored the doctors to do everything possible to save their daughter. And they did. On Aug. 30, Melinda Guido was born four months premature at Los Angeles County/USC Medical Center.
OPINION
September 16, 2012
Re "Prosecutions worry doctors," Sept. 12 In my opinion, any physician who does an adequate history and physical examination and uses his education and training from medical school, an internship and his residency will properly be able to prescribe pain medication to control a patient's pain and not cause addiction. These responsible physicians have nothing to fear from the justice system. V.J. Carollo, MD Upland ALSO:
OPINION
September 8, 2011 | By Tracy Weber and Charles Ornstein
Your doctor gives you an expensive new drug to control your cholesterol, or recommends a certain brand of artificial hip, or says you need a stent to open a clogged artery. He's the expert. But how do you know his expertise is untainted? The makers of the drug, the replacement hip or the stent may have paid your doctor to deliver promotional talks extolling the virtues of the product. Or they could be paying him, or her, to consult on marketing plans. It doesn't necessarily follow, of course, that this kind of moonlighting influences the treatment you receive.
HEALTH
March 9, 2013
Running the L.A. Marathon? Here's your chance to ask experts from the Keck Medical Center at USC how you can prepare for the race and recover from it as soon — and as gracefully — as possible. Three USC physicians will be available for a live chat at 4:30 p.m. Pacific time on Monday. To join us, click here: http://lat.ms/XQC7cV.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2011 | By Greg Braxton, Los Angeles Times
KCBS-TV Channel 2 reporter Serene Branson smiled uneasily. She was back in the newsroom Thursday for the first time since becoming an instant ? and reluctant ? media sensation after she had infamously garbled her words during a live report at the Grammy Awards. But the 31-year-old journalist wasn't going back to work just yet. Instead she was back to be interviewed by her anchor, Pat Harvey, and to finally view the 17-second clip that triggered ridicule, concern and speculation that she'd suffered an on-air stroke or worse.
OPINION
January 17, 2013
Re "Official vows to act on reckless doctors," Jan. 13 The Times has rightly been exposing those doctors in California who overprescribe narcotics and other addicting drugs for the profit they make and not to help patients. Now some in the Legislature want to give the Medical Board of California more investigators to help in this fight. I have a better idea how to stop those dishonest doctors: have the Legislature stop taking over one-third of the license fee money that doctors pay to fund the medical board and transferring it to the state general fund to cover the budget deficit.
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