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BUSINESS
September 14, 2013 | By Chad Terhune
The doctor can't see you now. Consumers may hear that a lot more often after getting health insurance under President Obama's Affordable Care Act. To hold down premiums, major insurers in California have sharply limited the number of doctors and hospitals available to patients in the state's new health insurance market opening Oct. 1. New data reveal the extent of those cuts in California, a crucial test bed for the federal healthcare law....
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NEWS
August 24, 1995 | BARRY SIEGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the moment China Leonard met Dr. Joseph Verbrugge Jr., she didn't like him. They were in a pre-op room at Denver's St. Joseph Hospital, where China's son Richard, 8, was being prepared for minor ear surgery. It was 7:15 a.m. on July 8, 1993. Verbrugge, the scheduled anesthesiologist, had rushed in late, acting bristly and abrupt. "Well, are you nervous?" Verbrugge demanded of Richard. Richard didn't look up from the television. He'd been uncommonly subdued all morning.
NEWS
August 17, 2011 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
Talk to a doctor about medical malpractice, and he or she is likely to tell you this: Patients don't necessarily sue because a doctor made a mistake, they sue because they got a bad outcome. A report released today by the New England Journal of Medicine bears this out.  It finds that in a given year, 7.4% of doctors (on average) get sued by patients, but only 20% of those claims (on average) result in some sort of payment. Researchers from Harvard, USC and the Rand Corp. in Santa Monica examined malpractice claims against nearly 41,000 doctors who were covered by a single insurance company from 1991 to 2005.
NEWS
April 11, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
A majority of Americans support the idea of allowing terminally ill patients to end their lives with the help of their doctors. For instance, 55% of people questioned for the NPR -Truven Health Analytics Health Poll last  year said they were in favor of legalizing physician-assisted suicide. A BBC World News America/Harris Poll from the year before found that 58% believed that physician-assisted suicide should be a legal option for patients who request it. It's one thing to endorse physician-assisted suicide in principle.
NEWS
November 5, 2013 | By Susan Rohwer, guest blogger
Are doctors inadvertently fueling the anti-vaccine movement? A study published Monday in the Journal of Pediatrics analyzed more than 100 vaccine discussions involving 16 healthcare providers and found that how the doctor phrased the vaccine question had an impact on swaying parents who were hesitant about whether to vaccinate their children. The study found that when doctors told parents it was time to vaccinate (“It's time for Bobby to have his shots”) rather than presenting it as a question (“What do you want to do about Bobby's shots?
OPINION
September 16, 2012
Re "Prosecutions worry doctors," Sept. 12 In my opinion, any physician who does an adequate history and physical examination and uses his education and training from medical school, an internship and his residency will properly be able to prescribe pain medication to control a patient's pain and not cause addiction. These responsible physicians have nothing to fear from the justice system. V.J. Carollo, MD Upland ALSO:
OPINION
September 8, 2011 | By Tracy Weber and Charles Ornstein
Your doctor gives you an expensive new drug to control your cholesterol, or recommends a certain brand of artificial hip, or says you need a stent to open a clogged artery. He's the expert. But how do you know his expertise is untainted? The makers of the drug, the replacement hip or the stent may have paid your doctor to deliver promotional talks extolling the virtues of the product. Or they could be paying him, or her, to consult on marketing plans. It doesn't necessarily follow, of course, that this kind of moonlighting influences the treatment you receive.
SCIENCE
March 5, 2014 | By Monte Morin
A baby infected with HIV appears to be free of the virus after doctors at a Long Beach hospital initiated aggressive drug treatment just four hours after birth. A pediatrician at Miller Children's Hospital Long Beach and her colleagues disclosed the case Wednesday at a Boston AIDS conference. The newborn girl was initially confirmed to have HIV through blood and spinal fluid tests. However, after six days of treatment with antiretroviral drugs, the virus could no longer be detected, doctors said.
HEALTH
March 9, 2013
Running the L.A. Marathon? Here's your chance to ask experts from the Keck Medical Center at USC how you can prepare for the race and recover from it as soon — and as gracefully — as possible. Three USC physicians will be available for a live chat at 4:30 p.m. Pacific time on Monday. To join us, click here: http://lat.ms/XQC7cV.
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