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NATIONAL
September 15, 2009 | Kim Geiger and Tom Hamburger
The American Medical Assn., after 60 years of opposing any government overhaul of healthcare, is now lobbying and advertising to win public support for President Obama's sweeping plan -- a proposal that promises hundreds of billions of dollars for America's doctors. Of all the interest groups that have won favorable terms in closed-door negotiations this year, the association representing the nation's physicians may have taken home the biggest prizes, including an agreement to stop planned cuts in Medicare payments that are worth $228 billion to doctors over 10 years.
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OPINION
September 16, 2012
Re "Prosecutions worry doctors," Sept. 12 In my opinion, any physician who does an adequate history and physical examination and uses his education and training from medical school, an internship and his residency will properly be able to prescribe pain medication to control a patient's pain and not cause addiction. These responsible physicians have nothing to fear from the justice system. V.J. Carollo, MD Upland ALSO:
OPINION
September 8, 2011 | By Tracy Weber and Charles Ornstein
Your doctor gives you an expensive new drug to control your cholesterol, or recommends a certain brand of artificial hip, or says you need a stent to open a clogged artery. He's the expert. But how do you know his expertise is untainted? The makers of the drug, the replacement hip or the stent may have paid your doctor to deliver promotional talks extolling the virtues of the product. Or they could be paying him, or her, to consult on marketing plans. It doesn't necessarily follow, of course, that this kind of moonlighting influences the treatment you receive.
HEALTH
March 9, 2013
Running the L.A. Marathon? Here's your chance to ask experts from the Keck Medical Center at USC how you can prepare for the race and recover from it as soon — and as gracefully — as possible. Three USC physicians will be available for a live chat at 4:30 p.m. Pacific time on Monday. To join us, click here: http://lat.ms/XQC7cV.
OPINION
January 17, 2013
Re "Official vows to act on reckless doctors," Jan. 13 The Times has rightly been exposing those doctors in California who overprescribe narcotics and other addicting drugs for the profit they make and not to help patients. Now some in the Legislature want to give the Medical Board of California more investigators to help in this fight. I have a better idea how to stop those dishonest doctors: have the Legislature stop taking over one-third of the license fee money that doctors pay to fund the medical board and transferring it to the state general fund to cover the budget deficit.
OPINION
January 5, 2014
Re "The gap in medical education," Opinion, Jan. 3 I would like to commend Rahul Rekhi's advocacy for incorporating health policy in medical education. In addition to focusing on healthcare systems and health economics, there is a critical need to focus on the impact of health policy on the underlying causes of disease. For example, medical care alone cannot address the obesity epidemic underlying the increasing prevalence of diabetes. Policies such as how we plan our communities, how much physical activity is provided in schools and how we promote nutritious food consumption have a great impact on the health of our communities.
HEALTH
June 14, 2010 | By Marni Jameson, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Want to look and feel younger? Click on Dr. Oz's website. Seeking an alternative treatment to what ails you? Visit Andrew Weil's daily blog. Aren't sure whether it's OK to spank your kid? Ask Dr. Phil. Society has revered famous physicians for years, swallowing their directives like vitamins. Dr. Benjamin Spock helped parents raise a generation. Surgeon General C. Everett Koop pushed the nation to kick, or at least curb, its smoking habit. Ruth Westheimer, a.k.a. "Dr. Ruth," encouraged us to talk about sex without squirming.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 2012 | By Kate Mather and Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
In his 30-plus years as a doctor, Bruce Tempest had never seen anything like it. A Navajo man having trouble breathing showed up at the emergency room of a small hospital in Gallup, N.M. Less than an hour later, he was dead. The man had been young, athletic and otherwise healthy. His fiancee had died days before, also from sudden breathing problems. "This is something different," Tempest, now 76, remembered thinking of the 1993 illnesses. "It just doesn't fit. " Tempest contacted area doctors, looking for other cases.
NEWS
August 17, 2011 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
Talk to a doctor about medical malpractice, and he or she is likely to tell you this: Patients don't necessarily sue because a doctor made a mistake, they sue because they got a bad outcome. A report released today by the New England Journal of Medicine bears this out.  It finds that in a given year, 7.4% of doctors (on average) get sued by patients, but only 20% of those claims (on average) result in some sort of payment. Researchers from Harvard, USC and the Rand Corp. in Santa Monica examined malpractice claims against nearly 41,000 doctors who were covered by a single insurance company from 1991 to 2005.
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