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BUSINESS
April 9, 2014 | By Chad Terhune and Doug Smith
Newport Beach oncologist Minh Nguyen woke up Wednesday wearing a dubious distinction: Medicare's highest-paid doctor in California and one of the top physicians nationwide. Some of his patients and fellow physicians immediately called him wanting an explanation of why newly released federal data show he got paid $11.3 million for treating Medicare patients in 2012. Like dozens of other doctors across the country, Nguyen was unwittingly thrust into the spotlight as federal officials listed for the first time what the government pays individual doctors to treat elderly Americans.
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OPINION
January 5, 2014
Re "The gap in medical education," Opinion, Jan. 3 I would like to commend Rahul Rekhi's advocacy for incorporating health policy in medical education. In addition to focusing on healthcare systems and health economics, there is a critical need to focus on the impact of health policy on the underlying causes of disease. For example, medical care alone cannot address the obesity epidemic underlying the increasing prevalence of diabetes. Policies such as how we plan our communities, how much physical activity is provided in schools and how we promote nutritious food consumption have a great impact on the health of our communities.
OPINION
January 17, 2013
Re "Official vows to act on reckless doctors," Jan. 13 The Times has rightly been exposing those doctors in California who overprescribe narcotics and other addicting drugs for the profit they make and not to help patients. Now some in the Legislature want to give the Medical Board of California more investigators to help in this fight. I have a better idea how to stop those dishonest doctors: have the Legislature stop taking over one-third of the license fee money that doctors pay to fund the medical board and transferring it to the state general fund to cover the budget deficit.
HEALTH
November 20, 2006 | Barron H. Lerner, Special to The Times
Today, someone suffering from forgetfulness is immediately assumed to have Alzheimer's disease. But it was only a few decades ago that famed actress Rita Hayworth's Alzheimer's was persistently misdiagnosed. One of World War II's most popular pin-up girls, Hayworth began having trouble remembering her lines during the 1960s, while in her 40s. She drank heavily at times, and her fellow actors largely suspected alcohol as the cause. So did her doctors.
HEALTH
September 5, 2011 | By Danielle Ofri, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"It's gonna be a big one," one of the nurses said in a dry, blasé voice, as she walked down the clinic hall. "Plane just hit one of the twin towers. They'll be coming in droves. " Her tone was the nearly bored resignation of someone who's worked in a city hospital for years and who's seen it all: Bellevue Hospital, after all, is the quintessential municipal hospital — huge emergency room, Level 1 trauma center, recipient of New York City's urban fallout for 275 years. Another plane crash, or train wreck, or gunfight, typically elicits not much more than a "Here we go again.
HEALTH
June 14, 2010 | By Marni Jameson, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Want to look and feel younger? Click on Dr. Oz's website. Seeking an alternative treatment to what ails you? Visit Andrew Weil's daily blog. Aren't sure whether it's OK to spank your kid? Ask Dr. Phil. Society has revered famous physicians for years, swallowing their directives like vitamins. Dr. Benjamin Spock helped parents raise a generation. Surgeon General C. Everett Koop pushed the nation to kick, or at least curb, its smoking habit. Ruth Westheimer, a.k.a. "Dr. Ruth," encouraged us to talk about sex without squirming.
HEALTH
December 21, 2009
Re "A Prescription for Snooping," Dec. 14: There is virtually no need for a physician to be "detailed" by a drug company representative. There is a publication for physicians, the Medical Letter, that has been published biweekly for the past nearly 50 years. It is the Consumer Reports of drug information for doctors, reviewing virtually all new (and re-reviewing, as needed, older) drugs. It contains what the doctor needs to know about how a drug works, as well as efficacy, safety, some cost information and whatever is known about comparisons to other drugs.
NEWS
November 5, 2013 | By Susan Rohwer, guest blogger
Are doctors inadvertently fueling the anti-vaccine movement? A study published Monday in the Journal of Pediatrics analyzed more than 100 vaccine discussions involving 16 healthcare providers and found that how the doctor phrased the vaccine question had an impact on swaying parents who were hesitant about whether to vaccinate their children. The study found that when doctors told parents it was time to vaccinate (“It's time for Bobby to have his shots”) rather than presenting it as a question (“What do you want to do about Bobby's shots?
NEWS
February 20, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
Perhaps you know whether you'd want to use marijuana to relieve severe pain or nausea. But if you were a doctor, what would you tell patients who asked about taking something that's against federal law? The New England Journal of Medicine poses the question to its readers and on Wednesday presented arguments for and against from doctors. The hypothetical patient is 68-year-old Marilyn, who has cancer and who says the standard medications are not relieving her pain and nausea.
BUSINESS
September 14, 2013 | By Chad Terhune
The doctor can't see you now. Consumers may hear that a lot more often after getting health insurance under President Obama's Affordable Care Act. To hold down premiums, major insurers in California have sharply limited the number of doctors and hospitals available to patients in the state's new health insurance market opening Oct. 1. New data reveal the extent of those cuts in California, a crucial test bed for the federal healthcare law....
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