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BUSINESS
September 14, 2013 | By Chad Terhune
The doctor can't see you now. Consumers may hear that a lot more often after getting health insurance under President Obama's Affordable Care Act. To hold down premiums, major insurers in California have sharply limited the number of doctors and hospitals available to patients in the state's new health insurance market opening Oct. 1. New data reveal the extent of those cuts in California, a crucial test bed for the federal healthcare law....
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HEALTH
December 21, 2009
Re "A Prescription for Snooping," Dec. 14: There is virtually no need for a physician to be "detailed" by a drug company representative. There is a publication for physicians, the Medical Letter, that has been published biweekly for the past nearly 50 years. It is the Consumer Reports of drug information for doctors, reviewing virtually all new (and re-reviewing, as needed, older) drugs. It contains what the doctor needs to know about how a drug works, as well as efficacy, safety, some cost information and whatever is known about comparisons to other drugs.
HEALTH
June 14, 2010 | By Marni Jameson, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Want to look and feel younger? Click on Dr. Oz's website. Seeking an alternative treatment to what ails you? Visit Andrew Weil's daily blog. Aren't sure whether it's OK to spank your kid? Ask Dr. Phil. Society has revered famous physicians for years, swallowing their directives like vitamins. Dr. Benjamin Spock helped parents raise a generation. Surgeon General C. Everett Koop pushed the nation to kick, or at least curb, its smoking habit. Ruth Westheimer, a.k.a. "Dr. Ruth," encouraged us to talk about sex without squirming.
SCIENCE
March 5, 2014 | By Monte Morin
A baby infected with HIV appears to be free of the virus after doctors at a Long Beach hospital initiated aggressive drug treatment just four hours after birth. A pediatrician at Miller Children's Hospital Long Beach and her colleagues disclosed the case Wednesday at a Boston AIDS conference. The newborn girl was initially confirmed to have HIV through blood and spinal fluid tests. However, after six days of treatment with antiretroviral drugs, the virus could no longer be detected, doctors said.
NATIONAL
April 18, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
Two Texas doctors who had been performing abortions for more than three decades lost their legal ability to do so at the end of March when their new hospital revoked their privileges. This week, a judge temporarily reinstated their positions. But the doctors face an April 30 court hearing to see if that temporary order will remain in place. The abortion case, like many others in Texas at the moment, was sparked by legislation passed last year that placed significant limits on who can perform abortions and where.
NEWS
February 8, 2012 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
Some things are better left unsaid - and that includes certain aspects of your medical condition, doctors say. In a nationwide survey of roughly 1,800 physicians, 17% had some level of disagreement with the notion that they should “never tell a patient something that is not true.” Not only that, but 11% of those surveyed acknowledged that they had told a patient “something that was not true” in the past year. The survey, led by Lisa Iezzoni, director of the Mongan Institute for Health Policy at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, didn't ask doctors for specifics about the type of untruths they told.
SPORTS
January 15, 2013 | By Houston Mitchell
Pro wrestling legend Hulk Hogan has sued the Laser Spine Institute in Florida, saying surgeries done there on his back were useless and cost him millions of dollars in revenue. Hogan went to the Institute in 2009 to get treatment for scoliosis and bulging discs but the operations he received left him feeling worse, according to the wrestler. Hogan claims he eventually had to undergo major back surgery with a different set of doctors to repair his back. The allegedly botched surgeries caused Hogan to miss several employment opportunities in wrestling and acting that would have earned him at least $50 million, according to the wrestler.
SCIENCE
September 4, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Has your doctor ever advised you to use sunscreen? Chances are, the answer is no. In fact, out of 18.3 billion doctor visits over nearly 21 years, sunscreen was recommended to patients only 12.83 million times, a new study finds. That works out to only 0.07% of visits. OK, you're thinking, surely doctors did a better job when they were seeing patients for a skin-related disease like melanoma or actinic keratosis . And indeed, they were 12 times more likely to mention sunscreen to these patients.
NEWS
September 14, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Terminally ill people should be given an honest prognosis from their doctors. That philosophy is now firmly entrenched in medicine. But there is less dedication to the idea of informing patients when death is imminent because of fears that patients or their family members may not want to know. A study published online this week suggests that healthcare professionals keep patients fully informed in the final days and hours of life. Researchers in Sweden examined 1,191 cases in which patients were informed of imminent death and a similar number in which patients were not informed.
NEWS
July 19, 2010 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
There is no question that a patient's medical records belong to the patient. Patients can ask for copies of everything health professionals enter into their files. Patient records, however, are meant to help the doctor or other health professional organization obtain information and treat the patient safely and effectively. So what would happen if patients had much easier access to the doctors' notes? The answer to that question should become clear later this year. Researchers led by a team at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Massachusetts have launched a pilot program called the OpenNotes Initiative.
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