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NEWS
April 11, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
A majority of Americans support the idea of allowing terminally ill patients to end their lives with the help of their doctors. For instance, 55% of people questioned for the NPR -Truven Health Analytics Health Poll last  year said they were in favor of legalizing physician-assisted suicide. A BBC World News America/Harris Poll from the year before found that 58% believed that physician-assisted suicide should be a legal option for patients who request it. It's one thing to endorse physician-assisted suicide in principle.
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NEWS
September 12, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Doctors are supposed to help patients eat healthfully - but they're not exactly dietary angels themselves.    Skipping from meeting (snacks provided) to conference (catered, with jumbo cookies) to lunch at the hospital cafeteria (sugary soda on the side), many fall into the same bad habits the rest of us do, consuming too many calories, gaining too much weight, and eating all the wrong foods. At least one group of researchers thinks it's time for this to change.  Writing in the journal JAMA on Tuesday (subscription required)
TRAVEL
June 8, 1997
I enjoyed the May 25 article on preparing for emergencies abroad ("Preparation Can Save Lives in Health Disasters Abroad," Travel Insider), but was surprised that you didn't include the organization IAMAT (International Assn. for Medical Assistance to Travelers). IAMAT has doctors in virtually every country of the world who not only speak English but have been trained in North America or Britain, so their medical standards are the same as ours. IAMAT will send a free membership card (donations welcome)
HEALTH
November 20, 2006 | Barron H. Lerner, Special to The Times
Today, someone suffering from forgetfulness is immediately assumed to have Alzheimer's disease. But it was only a few decades ago that famed actress Rita Hayworth's Alzheimer's was persistently misdiagnosed. One of World War II's most popular pin-up girls, Hayworth began having trouble remembering her lines during the 1960s, while in her 40s. She drank heavily at times, and her fellow actors largely suspected alcohol as the cause. So did her doctors.
WORLD
February 28, 2014 | By Alexandra Zavis
Doctors Without Borders has been ordered to cease activities in Myanmar, leaving  tens of thousands of patients without medical care, the Nobel Prize-winning aid group said Friday. Doctors Without Borders did not give a reason for the move. But local news reports said the government had taken issue with statements made by the group about sectarian violence in northern Rakhine state and accused it of bias toward the ethnic Rohingya Muslim minority. In a statement, Doctors Without Borders said it was “deeply shocked” by the suspension of its operations after 22 years in Myanmar and “extremely concerned about the fate” of patients under its care around the country.
NEWS
September 14, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Terminally ill people should be given an honest prognosis from their doctors. That philosophy is now firmly entrenched in medicine. But there is less dedication to the idea of informing patients when death is imminent because of fears that patients or their family members may not want to know. A study published online this week suggests that healthcare professionals keep patients fully informed in the final days and hours of life. Researchers in Sweden examined 1,191 cases in which patients were informed of imminent death and a similar number in which patients were not informed.
HEALTH
September 5, 2011 | By Danielle Ofri, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"It's gonna be a big one," one of the nurses said in a dry, blasé voice, as she walked down the clinic hall. "Plane just hit one of the twin towers. They'll be coming in droves. " Her tone was the nearly bored resignation of someone who's worked in a city hospital for years and who's seen it all: Bellevue Hospital, after all, is the quintessential municipal hospital — huge emergency room, Level 1 trauma center, recipient of New York City's urban fallout for 275 years. Another plane crash, or train wreck, or gunfight, typically elicits not much more than a "Here we go again.
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