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OPINION
January 5, 2014
Re "The gap in medical education," Opinion, Jan. 3 I would like to commend Rahul Rekhi's advocacy for incorporating health policy in medical education. In addition to focusing on healthcare systems and health economics, there is a critical need to focus on the impact of health policy on the underlying causes of disease. For example, medical care alone cannot address the obesity epidemic underlying the increasing prevalence of diabetes. Policies such as how we plan our communities, how much physical activity is provided in schools and how we promote nutritious food consumption have a great impact on the health of our communities.
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NEWS
February 20, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
Perhaps you know whether you'd want to use marijuana to relieve severe pain or nausea. But if you were a doctor, what would you tell patients who asked about taking something that's against federal law? The New England Journal of Medicine poses the question to its readers and on Wednesday presented arguments for and against from doctors. The hypothetical patient is 68-year-old Marilyn, who has cancer and who says the standard medications are not relieving her pain and nausea.
SCIENCE
March 5, 2014 | By Monte Morin
A baby infected with HIV appears to be free of the virus after doctors at a Long Beach hospital initiated aggressive drug treatment just four hours after birth. A pediatrician at Miller Children's Hospital Long Beach and her colleagues disclosed the case Wednesday at a Boston AIDS conference. The newborn girl was initially confirmed to have HIV through blood and spinal fluid tests. However, after six days of treatment with antiretroviral drugs, the virus could no longer be detected, doctors said.
HEALTH
December 21, 2009
Re "A Prescription for Snooping," Dec. 14: There is virtually no need for a physician to be "detailed" by a drug company representative. There is a publication for physicians, the Medical Letter, that has been published biweekly for the past nearly 50 years. It is the Consumer Reports of drug information for doctors, reviewing virtually all new (and re-reviewing, as needed, older) drugs. It contains what the doctor needs to know about how a drug works, as well as efficacy, safety, some cost information and whatever is known about comparisons to other drugs.
NEWS
September 12, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Doctors are supposed to help patients eat healthfully - but they're not exactly dietary angels themselves.    Skipping from meeting (snacks provided) to conference (catered, with jumbo cookies) to lunch at the hospital cafeteria (sugary soda on the side), many fall into the same bad habits the rest of us do, consuming too many calories, gaining too much weight, and eating all the wrong foods. At least one group of researchers thinks it's time for this to change.  Writing in the journal JAMA on Tuesday (subscription required)
NEWS
October 21, 2010
A recent survey found that only 6% of Americans are familiar with a website operated by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services that allows consumers to look up information comparing hospitals on quality. There are probably several reasons why people don't make much use of the site -- called Hospital Compare -- in which ratings are based on data from standardized measurement tools. One reason may be that the public isn't invited to participate in the ratings process, say experts on healthcare quality.
NEWS
February 8, 2012 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
Some things are better left unsaid - and that includes certain aspects of your medical condition, doctors say. In a nationwide survey of roughly 1,800 physicians, 17% had some level of disagreement with the notion that they should “never tell a patient something that is not true.” Not only that, but 11% of those surveyed acknowledged that they had told a patient “something that was not true” in the past year. The survey, led by Lisa Iezzoni, director of the Mongan Institute for Health Policy at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, didn't ask doctors for specifics about the type of untruths they told.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 2010 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske and Ron-Gong Lin II
Emergency room doctors and on-call specialists treating poor, uninsured patients at private hospitals in Los Angeles County saw their reimbursement rate slashed by county supervisors Tuesday. The rate cut could lead private hospitals to close emergency rooms and send more patients to crowded county hospitals, officials said. L.A. County reimburses doctors 27% of estimated fees for patients' first three days of care at private hospitals under the Physician Services for Indigents Program.
BUSINESS
December 17, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
Ending a practice that some say creates a conflict of interest, British pharmaceutical company GlaxoSmithKline said Tuesday it would end its practice of paying doctors to promote its drugs. Glaxo, maker of drugs such as the antidepressant Paxil, also said it would no longer tie compensation of sales representatives to the number of prescriptions a doctor writes, the company's chief executive said in a statement. The changes "are designed to bring greater clarity and confidence that whenever we talk to a doctor, nurse or other prescriber, it is patients' interests that always come first," said Andrew Witty, Glaxo's chief executive.
HEALTH
September 5, 2011 | By Danielle Ofri, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"It's gonna be a big one," one of the nurses said in a dry, blasé voice, as she walked down the clinic hall. "Plane just hit one of the twin towers. They'll be coming in droves. " Her tone was the nearly bored resignation of someone who's worked in a city hospital for years and who's seen it all: Bellevue Hospital, after all, is the quintessential municipal hospital — huge emergency room, Level 1 trauma center, recipient of New York City's urban fallout for 275 years. Another plane crash, or train wreck, or gunfight, typically elicits not much more than a "Here we go again.
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