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Document Preservation

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1990 | HERBERT J. VIDA
To preserve history, one must first save the paper it is written on, and Jane Mueller, a preservation librarian, is an expert in that lonely field. "People don't understand that there are things that can be done to preserve those important documents," said the Buena Park woman, who has mastered the fine art of paper preservation. With modern methods, paper can be preserved indefinitely, Mueller said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
June 4, 2009 | Anna Gorman
Historical government files that chronicle the lives of immigrants in the U.S. will become part of the National Archives instead of being destroyed, officials announced Wednesday. The files could reveal the untold stories of millions of immigrants, including scores of Jews who fled Europe after World War II and Chinese who came to the U.S. as part of the diaspora.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 1989 | MICHAEL J. YBARRA and NINA J. EASTON, Times Staff Writers
Fifty years after first setting foot in town, Mr. Smith has come to Washington again. The 1939 film classic "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington" was among 25 movies cited Tuesday as American movie treasures by the Library of Congress. The move was designed to bring attention to the fragility of the medium and spur wider efforts to protect its finest exemplars. The proposal to designate certain films as "national treasures" grew out of the controversy over colorizing black-and-white films.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 2007 | Geoff Boucher, Times Staff Writer
REMEMBER when comic books were considered too juvenile to be read? Now it appears that they have become too valuable to be touched. A company in Sarasota, Fla., has created a sensation among collectors by taking their comic books, both rare vintage issues and brand-new ones, and encasing them in plastic slabs that make them both unreadable and instantly more valuable. The Captain Marvel and Donald Duck comic books that arrive at the offices of the Certified Guaranty Co.
NEWS
May 6, 1990 | JASON B. JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over the next three months, it is estimated that more than 3.5 million of the nation's 300 million research library books will silently decompose and die as a result of acid contained in their pages. "If you walk in the library there is a distinctive odor, and you know it's the odor of disintegrating books in the stacks," said Scott Bennett, director of the Milton Eisenhower Library at Johns Hopkins University.
NEWS
February 24, 1991
ISRAEL MUSEUM'S PRICELESS HOLDINGS, from the Dead Sea Scrolls to works by Renoir and Van Gogh, have been put away for safekeeping. Yards and yards of the 2,000-year-old Dead Sea Scrolls, which include the first known biblical texts, lie in a vault with a foot-thick steel door. On the floor are racks of Impressionist and modern paintings. Jerusalem, with its large Arab population, has not been hit by any of Iraq's Scud missile attacks, but the museum is taking no chances.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1992 | G. BRUCE SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Robert Aitchison pulls a large box from a drawer in a file cabinet, lifts the lid and reveals the contents: a hardly recognizable clump of crumpled and torn paper. His job--if the client gives him the go-ahead--will be to take that mess of paper and restore it so that it can be used in a court of law. The paper is the ship's log from an oil-drilling vessel that sank in the South China Sea and may be used as evidence in a lawsuit resulting from the disaster.
NEWS
March 14, 1990 | LYNN SIMROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's that dreaded time of the year again: tax season. And if you're knee-deep in papers that need to be sorted, you're stuck with a nasty, time-consuming task. Why not get organized now for next year? But which important papers and records to keep and which to toss? And where and how long to keep them? "The first thing is to try to take a more organized approach than most people do," said Tom Gau of Kavesh & Gau, a financial planning and tax preparation firm in Torrance.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 1990
Twenty-five American films, ranging from the Walt Disney 1940 classic "Fantasia" to the obscure 1943 18-minute "Meshes of the Afternoon," have been chosen for protection as film treasures for the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress. This is the second group of films tabbed for historic preservation under the terms of the 1988 National Film Preservation Act, which allows the registry to honor 25 films every year that are deemed "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant."
NEWS
January 24, 1988
The National Endowment for the Humanities has awarded the University of California, Berkeley, the largest library preservation grant ever given to a single institution. The grant could total $1.5 million over the next three years, according to the endowment and UC. Immediate target of the funds will be the preservation of thousands of volumes in the European language and literature collections. The money will be used to save books that have grown brittle and fragile with age.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 2005 | David Pierson, Times Staff Writer
In Chinatown's Central Plaza, elderly men sit on benches sipping milk tea, old women nosily shuffle mah-jongg tiles and cooks clack metal spatulas against their woks, filling the air with the pungent aroma of ginger and garlic. Overlooking this scene is a white, three-story building guarded by a pair of stone lions. Venturing up the building's darkened stairway to the top floor is like entering a time capsule that tells the history of Chinatown and the community that grew from it.
NEWS
December 2, 2001 | SCOTT MARTELLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It all comes down to touch. David and Marsha Karpeles sift through their collection of yellowing documents and think about the people who first handled them and about the faded but still vibrant words they wrote. There's Pope Lucius III as he gave instructions to his knights on the eve of the Third Crusade. Thomas Jefferson as he gave voice to a young nation's dreams for itself. Abraham Lincoln as he ended legal slavery in the midst of the Civil War.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 2001 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
Culminating a lengthy legal battle, the Los Angeles County district attorney's office has agreed to preserve indefinitely all files dealing with death penalty cases or cases that result in life sentences, according to settlement documents obtained Wednesday by The Times. Dist. Atty. Steve Cooley also agreed to preserve all felony files for at least 25 years and all misdemeanor files for five years.
NEWS
February 25, 2001 | JILL LEOVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Guillermo Sheridan had a bitter smile as he scrolled down the list of acquisitions by Princeton University: The papers of Carlos Fuentes, Miguel Angel Asturias, Julio Cortazar, Elena Garro--even a lesser known Mexican poet named Bernardo Ortiz de Montellano. "We Mexicans always sell our raw materials," he remarked acidly, stopping at Ortiz's name on his computer screen. "Coffee, copper--and this."
NEWS
February 13, 2000 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an Ethiopian mountaintop monastery. In a stable on the island of Malta. In the ancestral castle of a German prince. In every remnant of our medieval past, the manuscripts are sought. They are wrinkled, some of them, and smudged--page after ancient page of parchment scribbled in a cramped and crabby script. Others are gorgeous, afire with art, shimmering with golden ink. They may tell of St. George slaying the dragon. Or relate a recipe for stew. They may tote up a carouser's debt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 1998 | Larry Stammer
More than 22,000 ancient manuscripts from the archives of a Greek Orthodox monastery at Mt. Athos in Thessaloniki, Greece, will be digitally copied by the Ancient Biblical Manuscript Center at Claremont Graduate University. The center, which said it pioneered the use of digital imaging technologies on the deteriorated Dead Sea Scrolls, reached agreement with the Patriarchal Institute for Patristic Studies in Greece to undertake the project.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 1988
The UCLA Film and Television Archives has received a $110,000 grant from the American Film Institute and National Endowment for the Arts Film Preservation Program in support of its nitrate film preservation program. The UCLA archives are one of 12 organizations receiving AFI/NEA grants totaling $355,600 to preserve, safeguard and restore films that might otherwise have been lost due to the deterioration of the nitrate base used in films until the early 1950s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1988
The saga that began two years ago for 700,000 books is nearing an end. The volumes were water-damaged when two arson fires ravaged the Central Library in downtown Los Angeles in 1986. The first step of the $2.8-million restoration process was to freeze them to arrest the development of mold and mildew. The second step was what the library has labeled as the largest book-drying project ever.
BUSINESS
June 8, 1998 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to preserve fading and fragile architectural diagrams, the Irvine Co. has launched an ambitious effort to digitally scan and archive all hand-drawn maps of its many commercial properties. The project is designed to help the Irvine Co.'s property managers work more efficiently--and help the company sign leasing deals more quickly, staff said.
NEWS
July 28, 1997 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The language is 1,000 years old, and the man who set out to save it, 42. In the context of a culture that is 4,000 years old, the perspective is important. The Yiddish language and its literature were hardly born yesterday. Aaron Lansky, in a manner of speaking, was. As it turns out, his relative youth was an asset, for the massive undertaking that became the $8-million National Yiddish Book Center here required the hubris--or, better yet, the chutzpah--of the young.
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