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ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
HBO is backing a new four-hour documentary on Frank Sinatra being touted as “the definitive portrait of our era's greatest performer. " The miniseries will be directed by Oscar-winner Alex Gibney. The untitled film is a collaboration between the newly formed Alcon Television Group and Frank Sinatra Enterprises, with Sinatra's daughter Nancy credited as one of the executive producers along with Oscar-winner Frank Marshall, Alcon Television President Sharon Hall and Alcon co-founders and co-CEO Broderick Johnson and Andrew Kosove.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2014 | By Matt Cooper
Customized TV Listings are available here: www.latimes.com/tvtimes Click here to download TV listings for the week of April 27 - May 3, 2014 in PDF format This week's TV Movies SERIES Outnumbered A panel of commentators - one man, four women - discusses the issues of the day in this new series. 9 a.m. Fox News Channel Dancing With the Stars "Livin' La Vida Loca" singer Ricky Martin serves as a guest judge on the reality competition. 8 p.m. ABC Mike & Molly Susan Sarandon reprises her role as Molly's (Melissa McCarthy)
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2012 | By Glenn Whipp
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced Monday its shortlist of 15 documentary feature finalists and, as always, the roll was as notable for its omissions as for its actual titles. Notably absent were such critically and commercially acclaimed docs as the Peter Jackson-produced West Memphis Three investigation, "West of Memphis," Sundance favorite "Queen of Versailles" and Monday's New York Film Critics Circle winner "The Central Park Five. " Another overlooked popular title,  "Paul Williams Still Alive," an in-depth look at the 1970s songwriter and the fickleness of fame, has also often been mentioned as a strong candidate in the original song category.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2014 | By Yvonne Villarreal
His is a name that has appeared in this publication's pages hundreds of times - as an author and as a subject. It's a name that calls up notions of the Latino struggle for civil rights and the radical Chicano movement in Los Angeles. It's also a name that initially made filmmaker Phillip Rodriguez groan when someone suggested the life behind the name as a subject for his next documentary. The legacy of former Los Angeles Times reporter and columnist Ruben Salazar has reached folklore heights since the journalist's suspicious death in 1970 at age 42. And therein lies Rodriguez's point of contention.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2013 | By Daniel Miller
The Electric Daisy Carnival is getting the documentary treatment from a pair of filmmakers who were behind the recent Justin Bieber and Katy Perry concert movies. “EDC 2013: You Are the Headliner” is being directed by Dan Cutforth and Jane Lipsitz of production company Magical Elves. The film will focus on next month's Electric Daisy festival in Las Vegas, a music event that is expected to draw 345,000 people.  Production company Haven Entertainment is making the movie in conjunction with Electric Daisy producer Insomniac Events. Los Angeles-based Insomniac puts on electronic dance music concerts at venues across Southern California and elsewhere. A 2010 iteration of the Electric Daisy rave drew as many as 200,000 to the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2010
Documentary "The Cove" Louie Psihoyos and Fisher Stevens After an unprecedented sweep through the guild awards for directing, producing, writing and editing, plus a host of critics' prizes, it was little surprise when "The Cove" was named best documentary feature. The film is an unapologetically activist look at the issue of dolphin fishing in Japan. Made with a structure that has been likened to a heist film, "The Cove" follows animal activist Richard O'Barry -- who once trained dolphins for the television show "Flipper" -- alongside a team of filmmakers as they attempt to document dolphin slaughter in the Japanese fishing village of Taiji.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
“Inocente,” directed by the team of Sean Fine and Andrea Nix Fine, won the Oscar for documentary short on Sunday. The film follows a homeless, undocumented immigrant teenage girl in San Diego as she relentlessly pursues her dream of becoming an artist. With heart and wit, the film explores the issue of  homelessness among youth while also capturing the power of art and ambition. The work aired first on EPIX and later MTV. The filmmakers were previously nominated for their documentary feature “War Dance” in 2007.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2011
"Senna," a documentary about Brazilian race-car driver Ayrton Senna, has gotten off to a speedy start at the box office. The film, which opened in one theater in Los Angeles and another in New York this past weekend, collected $66,075 for a solid per-theater average of $33,038, according to an estimate from distributor Producers Distribution Agency. "Senna" is the second release for the company founded by John Sloss' Cinetic Media last year when it distributed the Oscar-nominated documentary "Exit Through the Gift Shop" from the street artist Banksy.
NEWS
March 8, 2012 | By Michael A. Memoli
In a campaign thus far dominated by 30-second ads and debate sound bites, President Obama's reelection effort is taking a more expansive approach is it begins making its case to voters in earnest. Obama 2012 on Thursday released a two-minute trailer for what is ultimately set to be a 17-minute documentary that advisors say will "put into perspective" the challenges that the president has faced and the difficult choices he has made in an effort to put the American economy back on track.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2010
The estate of Michael Jackson is taking issue with a documentary to debut in Japan on the anniversary of the pop star's death Friday. According to a promotional website, the film was shot by Marc Schaffel, a former associate who had a major falling-out with Jackson in a messy trial in which they sued each other four years ago. In a statement sent to the Associated Press on Thursday, the estate says the film's promoters "misled Michael Jackson's...
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
Most film productions tend to spend a lot of time shooting a relatively narrow range of subject matter. "One Day on Earth" takes a slightly different approach. "Think globally, film locally" could be the motto for "Earth," a crowd-sourced film project originally founded to document a single 24-hour period with video snapshots from around the world. After holding three such events since 2010, the project's creators are now zooming in further with "Your Day. Your City. Your Future," a similar 24-hour collaboration that will take place across 11 American urban centers, including Los Angeles, and explore the issues and cultures poised to define cities over the next 20 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | By Steven Zeitchik
NEW YORK -- A feature about Israeli female soldiers and a documentary about an American fighting in Libya took top jury prizes at the Tribeca Film Festival Thursday night. “Zero Motivation,” Talya Lavie's Hebrew-language look at a group of complicated soldiers on the cusp of adulthood, took the award for best narrative feature, while “Point and Shoot,” Marshall Curry's movie about a Baltimore man who takes up arms on behalf of the rebels in Libya in 2011, took the top documentary prize.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | By Sheri Linden
Nicole Teeny's first feature-length documentary unveils a little-known subculture, one that combines the Good Book with good old-fashioned competitiveness. But the National Bible Quiz Championship, with its teams of Scripture-spouting teens, isn't the main event in "Bible Quiz. " A smart, funny and disarming 17-year-old girl is the heart of this low-key charmer of a coming-of-age story. The intimate film, a prize winner at the Slamdance Film Festival, revolves around the experience of Mikayla Irle, a tomboyish 12th-grader with family troubles who finds a sense of belonging on a Bible Quiz team in Tacoma, Wash.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | By Inkoo Kang
For all the dangers football poses to its players, the sport still represents hope to thousands of young men. Judd Ehrlich's persuasive but slight documentary "We Could Be King" movingly argues for the necessity of high-school athletics, especially in low-income communities, where pigskin is a key tool educators have in encouraging would-be dropouts to stay in school. After the Philadelphia school board closes 37 schools and merges Martin Luther King High with its Germantown rivals, heroic Ed Dunn oversees the union of the two football teams.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | By Martin Tsai
The documentary "Cesar's Last Fast" covers much the same ground as the dramatized "Cesar Chavez" released last month. Both center on the labor leader who in the 1960s helped to form the United Farm Workers union, organize the California grape workers' strike and foment a nationwide boycott of table grapes. Although "Cesar's Last Fast" extends the coverage by two decades, the same criticisms lodged against "Cesar Chavez" are applicable here: Richard Ray Perez's documentary concerns the myth more than the man. Perez has made a commendable effort rounding up archival footage, photographs and interviewees.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2014 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Start with a sex-mad baroness and her frisky ménage à trois. Add in a stern German philosopher who fancied himself the next Friedrich Nietzsche, his mistress and a married couple who wanted a wholesome Swiss Family Robinson experience for their son. Throw them all together on one of the remotest spots on Earth and simmer until things come to a steamy boil. You couldn't make this stuff up, and, as a lively new documentary reports, you don't have to. "The Galapagos Affair: Satan Came to Eden" tells a humdinger of a story about wild doings on those celebrated islands off the coast of Ecuador.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2011
MOVIES "Brand X" An artifact of 1960s counterculture and a forerunner to such programs as "Saturday Night Live" and "SCTV," this absurdist film parody of a TV show tackles the Vietnam War, sex, drugs, technology and more. The film is directed by Wynn Chamberlain and stars Frank Cavestani, Abbie Hoffman and Sam Shepard. Hammer Museum, 10899 Wilshire Blvd., L.A. 7 p.m. Free. (310) 443-7000. hammer.ucla.edu . "George Harrison: Living in the Material World" The first major museum exhibition to explore the life of former Beatle George Harrison, it provides an in-depth view of his creative life.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 2012 | By Reed Johnson
Looks like Lady Gaga is tearing another page out of the Madonna platinum-blond, pop-superstar playbook. In the early '90s, Madonna launched a new phase of her career by allowing director Alek Keshishian to make a documentary, "Truth or Dare," about the singer's Blond Ambition tour. Keshishian's film painted Madonna in a candid and revealing light and included a memorable cameo by her then-boy-toy Warren Beatty, who in one sequence makes the laughing observation about Madonna: "She doesn't want to live off-camera, much less talk.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2014 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
If "Watermark" does nothing else, it will make you question society's contradictory view of water use. The clear liquid is as essential to human life as it is threatened, yet we don't seem to be able to do what it takes to make sure it stays available enough to keep us alive. As co-directed by Jennifer Baichwal and Edward Burtynsky, "Watermark" is a kind of companion piece to the pair's earlier "Manufactured Landscapes," which looked at how new industrial structures are transforming the face of the planet.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2014 | Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Ken Burns' new documentary, "The Address," which premieres Tuesday on PBS, is not at all what we have come to think of as a Ken Burns film. There are no celebrity voices reading documents of the dead; no narrator reading the words of Geoffrey C. Ward; no team of experts to elucidate the American past or an American pastime; no Buck O'Neil to bring back a world lost, but remembered. No "Ken Burns Effect," for that matter, the signature, all-but-patented, slow, close caress of old photographs that has taken his name.
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