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NEWS
May 23, 2012 | By Kim Geiger
WASHINGTON -- In the months after the U.S. military mission that killed Osama bin Laden, Pentagon officials met with Hollywood filmmakers and gave them special access in an effort to influence the creation of a film about the operation, newly released documents show. Emails and meeting transcripts obtained from the Pentagon and CIA through a Freedom of Information Act lawsuit by the watchdog group Judicial Watch suggest that officials went out of their way to assist the filmmakers, while trying to avoid the public learning of their cooperation.
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NEWS
April 11, 2014 | By John M. Glionna, This post has been updated
LAS VEGAS - With a flash of comedic timing, Hillary Clinton dodged the first controversy of her not-yet-declared 2016 presidential run after a heckler threw a shoe and a nearly half-century-old political document at the former first lady and secretary of State during a speech here. Shortly after Clinton began a keynote speech Thursday night at an Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries convention, a woman walked down the aisle and threw the items. She then turned around, put her hands in the air and walked away as security officers took her into custody.
BUSINESS
April 4, 2010 | By Stephen Glassman and Donie Vanitzian
Question: Our covenants, conditions and restrictions state that our association has a pool available for year-round use by all owners. Our pool has been in and out of commission over the last four years and has not been functioning at all since at least December. The board claims to have entered into a contract of more than $11,000 to have the pool repaired but won't let owners see the contract. We also are having problems accessing association documents. If I request to see association-related documents, including the pool contract, under the Freedom of Information Act or California Public Records Act, is the board then required to show them to me and can I make a copy of them?
WORLD
September 2, 2013 | By Vincent Bevins and Tracy Wilkinson
SAO PAULO, Brazil --New documents leaked by former U.S. intelligence contractor Edward Snowden allege that Washington spied on the presidents of Mexico and Brazil, further complicating relations weeks before Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff's state visit to the United States. After journalist Glenn Greenwald made the revelations on Brazil's popular Globo TV network Sunday night, Rousseff called an emergency meeting with advisors and her government summoned U.S. Ambassador Thomas Shannon to explain the new allegations, which came after earlier reports of spying led Brazil to demand answers from a visiting Secretary of State John F. Kerry last month.
BUSINESS
January 27, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Even when you're slinging angry birds across the screen of your smartphone, the National Security Agency may be tracking your information, Monday reports said. The New York Times , the Guardian and Pro Publica have revealed documents leaked by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden that say the government agency and Britain's Government Communications used data from numerous smartphone apps to track users' locations, age, sex and other personal information. This initiative is referred to as "the mobile surge" in some of the documents . The surveillance tapped apps of popular services like Facebook, Flickr, LinkedIn and Twitter for user information such as address books, buddy lists and phone logs.
WORLD
April 14, 2010 | By Batsheva Sobelman
Is Anat Kam an Israeli hero or a traitor? She is accused of secretly copying more than 2,000 military documents, many of them classified, while serving mandatory duty as a soldier from 2005 to 2007, and then releasing some to the press. One document appeared to show that the Israeli army tried to circumvent court orders meant to rein in its use of targeted killings. Supporters say the 23-year-old Kam, who is on trial at Tel Aviv District Court, acted according to her conscience.
BUSINESS
March 30, 2014 | By Donie Vanitzian
Question: I'm the president of our homeowner association mainly because no one else wants the job. We live in a prestigious area of Los Angeles and have fewer than 30 units. Because nobody wants to be on our board we hired a management company. They're not a California company. Their head office is out of state, and we've never seen or been to their California place of business and do not know where it is or that they even have a California office. A management representative came and picked up our files and documents, including owners' personal information and accounts, and gave us their P.O. box number.
BUSINESS
February 2, 2010 | By Ken Bensinger and Ralph Vartabedian
As Toyota Motor Corp. scrambles to contain its sudden-acceleration crisis, another potential blow to the automaker's credibility is lurking in the form of a former Toyota attorney who is accusing the automaker in federal court of concealing safety issues from the public. A ruling expected soon in the suit could make public thousands of internal Toyota documents that show the company conspired to hide evidence in court, according to Dimitrios Biller, who defended Toyota in product liability cases until 2007.
BUSINESS
December 22, 2013 | By Donie Vanitzian
Question: Our homeowners association board of directors has been terrorized by our management company and lawyers who have been hounding directors into redoing all our governing documents by saying they are out of date and the board is at risk of being sued. They say it is now the law we have to synchronize all of our documents. We are sick and tired of spending money on legal fees and redoing all our documents. Every time management and their lawyers say "jump" we're supposed to say "how high" and pay them for the privilege!
NATIONAL
April 25, 2011 | By Richard A. Serrano, Washington Bureau
Most of those remaining at the Guantanamo Bay military prison are considered "high-risk" detainees who if released would pose grave threats to the U.S. and its allies, as did a third of those set free earlier, according to thousands of pages of classified documents being made public by WikiLeaks. Release of the more than 700 separate documents dealing with the prison, opened under the George W. Bush administration to house detainees in the war on terrorism, drew a sharp rebuke Sunday evening from the White House, which said the documents were obtained illegally.
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