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Dog Meat

SPORTS
October 14, 1992 | BILL PLASCHKE
Bob Walk, whose three-hitter led the Pirates to victory in Game 5, said he is bothered by the perception that his performance was somewhat of a miracle. "I have spent the last two days hearing people say things like, 'How could Walk have won that game?' " Walk said. "It's not like I'm a piece of dog meat. I have won games before, you know." Walk is 92-67 with a 3.82 earned-run average. This season he was 10-6 with a 3.20 ERA.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1989 | PENELOPE McMILLAN, Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals is putting together an educational campaign to teach immigrants that American culture "does not tolerate the consumption of dogs and other domestic pets as food," according to Edward C. Cubrda, the group's executive director.
NEWS
July 20, 1986 | JAMES KYNGE, Reuters
After purges that left Peking virtually without any dogs three years ago, the snub-nosed Pekingese and other breeds are coming back as the exclusive playthings of the capital's privileged present-day mandarins. Peking's only private pet veterinary surgeon says that small dogs like the Pekingese, the Shih Tzu and the Chihuahua are the latest addition to the households of top scientists, politicians and generals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 2012 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Recently, I was jarred to read an essay that ran on the front page of this newspaper two decades ago. "Suddenly, I am scared to be Asian," the author wrote. "More specifically, I am afraid of being mistaken for Korean. " Those words were mine, a fourth-generation Chinese American, written as large swaths of L.A. were smoldering. I'm sure my remarks made some readers suspect I had slept through Political Correctness 101. Had the violence racking the city really rubbed me so raw? It's easy to forget how confounding the events of that spring were for Los Angeles.
NEWS
December 2, 2001 | MARGARET WONG, ASSOCIATED PRESS
As a child, Wai Ka-wing used to enjoy a meal of dog meat, and it was a luxury--costing twice a much as beef or pork. Now, he has a pet Shih Tzu that sleeps beside him, and his deep affection for Fifi keeps him from even thinking about eating dogs. "We used to have them in our dishes, but now they are part of our family," the 53-year-old retired firefighter says. "It's so awful to see them die."
SPORTS
May 5, 2002 | GRAHAME L. JONES
Four weeks from today, defending champion France and first-time World Cup participant Senegal will step onto the field at the largest soccer-only stadium in Asia and 64,677 fans at the Sangam World Cup Stadium in Seoul, South Korea, will ask: "Where are all the gnomes?" If that seems absurd, it is, but it's no more bizarre than a whole host of peculiar happenings occurring in the run-up to Korea/Japan '02, the first World Cup to be held in Asia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 2011 | Claudia Luther, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Jerry Leiber, who with his songwriting partner, Mike Stoller, created a songbook that infused the rock 'n' roll scene of the 1950s and early '60s with energy and mischievous humor, has died. He was 78. Leiber, the words half of the duo, died Monday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles of cardiopulmonary failure, said Randy Poe, president of the songwriters' music publishing company.   Inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1985 and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1987, Leiber and his lifelong writing partner, Stoller, wrote hits that included Elvis Presley's rat-a-tat-tat rendition of "Hound Dog" in 1956 and Peggy Lee's 1969 recording of the jaded "Is That All There Is?"
WORLD
June 21, 2013 | By Zulfiqar Ali and Mark Magnier
PESHAWAR, Pakistan -- At least 15 people were killed and dozens more wounded Friday when a suicide bomber, apparently a teenager, blew himself up inside a mosque in northern Pakistan, police said. The bomber shot at police guards, then made his way into the Shiite mosque adjacent to the Hussaini Seminary in the Gulshan neighborhood of Peshawar, said Aamir Shakiri, the seminary's principal. He then detonated his explosives in the mosque's main hall as people prepared for Friday prayers.
WORLD
October 1, 2010 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
The government people came one night in late September and built a partition covered with bright blue plastic sheeting and adorned with cartoonish tiger mascots and "Come Out and Play" slogans. It hid the slum known as Coolie Camp on the airport road where the foreigners pass. Irfana Begum, 40, who collects garbage, must now lug her three-wheeled bicycle over about 300 feet of rocky ground to get to the road and make her living. Begum, a 15-year resident of the slum, squatted in the dirt in a dusty sari, her bare feet adorned with toe rings.
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