YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsDog


October 9, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
President Obama's nod to the idea of a short-term increase in the debt limit has people talking about whether offering Republicans this option is smart or dumb. Smart: It relieves the pressure of near-term brinkmanship. Dumb: It just means there will be another standoff crisis in a few weeks.  There's a certain small amount of value in buying time, however; the question is whether anything good happens in the interim. That question reminds me of a Jewish parable about the Polish landowner's talking dog, which I heard from the corporate conglomerator Meshulam Riklis in 1986.
April 3, 2012 | By Mark Medina
In the middle of several nights, Ramon Sessions woke up dazed and confused. He then searched around his Manhattan Beach residence, wondering about his pet dog's whereabouts. Sesh, his 6-month-old Staffordshire terrier, wasn't there, though. The dog remained in Cleveland for nine days with Sessions' cousin after the Cavaliers traded him to the Lakers. It turns out Sessions' arrival to the Lakers involved much more than learning the offense, playing with new teammates and getting settled in a new area.
August 30, 2003
Re "She Can Fetch $150,000," Aug. 21: So the dog walker is charging $25 per dog to take dogs, illegally off-leash, into rattlesnake territory, and then regretfully has a snakebite incident? Or she takes them to the dog park (where she cannot possibly monitor all 12 dogs, much less pick up after them). And she is hurt by the celebrity's accusation that she might have leaked personal information (while cheerfully doing so to The Times)? Responsible dog owners take note. And save your $25. Janine Smith Los Angeles
June 9, 2000
Re "Airliner Makes Unscheduled Stop to Save the Life of a Dog in Cargo," June 6: With the exception, of course, of the baggage handler who erroneously put the dog in the unheated cargo hold, United Airlines did everything right. The flight crew's decision to land and then to let Dakota ride to San Jose in the passenger cabin was humane and a nonthreat to corporate accountability. I'd like to think that had an error been discovered that may have affected the safety of a flight, the same "forget the blame and remedy the situation immediately" tactic would be used.
October 30, 2013 | By Soumya Karlamangla
Tanya Meyer knew almost immediately that something wasn't right. She let her two dogs, Zoey and Maggie, out of the house and into the surrounding woods in the small town of Rome, Wis., where they live. Maggie came lumbering back within moments last Friday morning. But Zoey, a chocolate 1 1/2 -year old Labrador mix, was nowhere to be seen. “I started calling for her and she wasn't answering," Meyer told the Los Angeles Times. She was worried because the area around her isolated central Wisconsin house is mostly forested, and regularly used as hunting grounds.
March 17, 2014 | By Judi Dash
Your dog may eagerly scamper wherever you do, especially on vacation, but his paws can become cracked and infected, especially on surfaces such as hot pavement or sand. That's where Alcott's Adventure Boots can be your dog's second best friend. These tough booties (four to a package, obviously), have thick rubber soles for protection and traction, and double Velcro closures with reflective accents for nighttime visibility. Your dog will take to these like … well, like a dog takes to boots, so you'll likely need some patience and practice to get canine cooperation.
July 2, 2013 | By Matt Hamilton
A video showing a Hawthorne police officer fatally shooting a dog is drawing outrage on the Internet, and its owner claims he was targeted because of pending claims against the department. The shooting Sunday occurred after a standoff between police and armed robbery suspects near the intersection of 137th Street and Jefferson Avenue. Officers handcuffed bystander Leon Rosby, 52, after he walked close to the scene with an 80-pound Rottweiler on a “long leash-line," creating “an increasingly dangerous situation,” the Hawthorne Police Department said in statement.
April 7, 1999
It's 12:45 a.m. on a Sunday. I am reading in bed with the window open to hear the night sounds. The coyotes are yipping and calling as usual, but they sound closer tonight, much as they did 35 years ago. This was, and still is, their home and hunting ground, even if humans are crowding them out. The yipping becomes frenzied and suddenly mixed with the terrified yips of a dog. It's all over in about 20 seconds. Silence is profound; nothing disturbs the darkness. Other neighborhood dogs are quiet, safe behind their fences.
Los Angeles Times Articles