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April 3, 2012 | By Mark Medina
In the middle of several nights, Ramon Sessions woke up dazed and confused. He then searched around his Manhattan Beach residence, wondering about his pet dog's whereabouts. Sesh, his 6-month-old Staffordshire terrier, wasn't there, though. The dog remained in Cleveland for nine days with Sessions' cousin after the Cavaliers traded him to the Lakers. It turns out Sessions' arrival to the Lakers involved much more than learning the offense, playing with new teammates and getting settled in a new area.
October 9, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
President Obama's nod to the idea of a short-term increase in the debt limit has people talking about whether offering Republicans this option is smart or dumb. Smart: It relieves the pressure of near-term brinkmanship. Dumb: It just means there will be another standoff crisis in a few weeks.  There's a certain small amount of value in buying time, however; the question is whether anything good happens in the interim. That question reminds me of a Jewish parable about the Polish landowner's talking dog, which I heard from the corporate conglomerator Meshulam Riklis in 1986.
June 21, 2013 | By Julie Makinen
BEIJING -- For animal lovers in China, the week seemed to bring one discouraging headline after another. First, tourists in a southern resort reportedly manhandled a stranded dolphin and took photos with it rather than immediately call for help; the mammal later died. Then, customs authorities announced that they had caught two men trying to smuggle more than 200 bear paws into the country from Russia; the feet are considered a delicacy in some parts of China.  On Friday, the southern city of Yulin went ahead with a dog meat festival, over the objection of activists who complained many of the table-bound canines were abducted strays and pets being slaughtered at unlicensed butcheries.
September 23, 2011 | By Michael Muskal
Medieval alchemists may have spent lifetimes seeking a way to turn base metals into silver or gold, but Gary Johnson, the libertarian former governor of New Mexico, seemingly has found a way to make political gold out of dog poop. In a throwaway line at the GOP presidential debate on Thursday night, Johnson, whose campaign for the nomination is struggling to get into single digits,  won the comedy award of the night during questioning about the Obama administration's stimulus spending plans.
July 19, 2009 | Larry Harnisch
"Dog coursing" was a sensationally popular pastime in Los Angeles that flourished in the 1890s despite repeated court rulings of animal cruelty. The fight over coursing was so fierce that its supporters nearly derailed the city's annexation of USC and nearby Agricultural Park, where the races were held.
June 9, 2000
Re "Airliner Makes Unscheduled Stop to Save the Life of a Dog in Cargo," June 6: With the exception, of course, of the baggage handler who erroneously put the dog in the unheated cargo hold, United Airlines did everything right. The flight crew's decision to land and then to let Dakota ride to San Jose in the passenger cabin was humane and a nonthreat to corporate accountability. I'd like to think that had an error been discovered that may have affected the safety of a flight, the same "forget the blame and remedy the situation immediately" tactic would be used.
August 13, 2013 | By Ari Bloomekatz
It's not clear how the dog wound up in the middle of San Francisco Bay, but when windsurfers and a boating commuter stumbled upon the Labrador mix on Monday, she was cold and in need of help. "She was shivering and wet and very shy," said 52-year-old Lisa Grodin, whose husband, Adam Cohen, found the dog as he was commuting across the bay to their home in Berkeley about 6:45 p.m.  Grodin said Tuesday that her husband saw a group of windsurfers with "their sails down around this little black dot that turned out to be a dog....
April 7, 1999
It's 12:45 a.m. on a Sunday. I am reading in bed with the window open to hear the night sounds. The coyotes are yipping and calling as usual, but they sound closer tonight, much as they did 35 years ago. This was, and still is, their home and hunting ground, even if humans are crowding them out. The yipping becomes frenzied and suddenly mixed with the terrified yips of a dog. It's all over in about 20 seconds. Silence is profound; nothing disturbs the darkness. Other neighborhood dogs are quiet, safe behind their fences.
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