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Dogma Movie

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November 10, 1999 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Kevin Smith is talking about the Catholic dogma of papal infallibility. He's fondly recounting how his eighth-grade religion teacher, Sister Theresa, sparked his hunger for deeper inquiry into topics like the lives of the saints and the Gnostic gospels. He's even talking--seriously--about becoming a deacon after his movie-making days are over so he can use his gift of gab to sell Jesus in a hip and passionate way.
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NEWS
November 14, 1999 | MIKE DOWNEY
Kevin Smith, parochial enemy No. 1, tramps down a theater aisle in baggy jeans, making his way to the front of a Sunset Boulevard screening room. He is about to show his new movie, the one that certain Catholics protested so vehemently that the Disney studio didn't dare release it. Standing left of curtain, the 29-year-old writer-director from New Jersey jokes that he can't wait to have his film seen "by a bunch of godless, soulless, narcissistic Los Angelenos." As for Disney . . .
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 1999 | KATHLEEN CRAUGHWELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles premiere of Kevin Smith's controversial comedy "Dogma" could hardly have been more different than the movie's East Coast premiere at the New York Film Festival. In New York, Smith and the film's stars were ushered into Lincoln Center under the watch of tense security guards with every effort being made to keep the principals away from the droves of sign- and crucifix-wielding picketers.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 1999 | KATHLEEN CRAUGHWELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles premiere of Kevin Smith's controversial comedy "Dogma" could hardly have been more different than the movie's East Coast premiere at the New York Film Festival. In New York, Smith and the film's stars were ushered into Lincoln Center under the watch of tense security guards with every effort being made to keep the principals away from the droves of sign- and crucifix-wielding picketers.
NEWS
November 14, 1999 | MIKE DOWNEY
Kevin Smith, parochial enemy No. 1, tramps down a theater aisle in baggy jeans, making his way to the front of a Sunset Boulevard screening room. He is about to show his new movie, the one that certain Catholics protested so vehemently that the Disney studio didn't dare release it. Standing left of curtain, the 29-year-old writer-director from New Jersey jokes that he can't wait to have his film seen "by a bunch of godless, soulless, narcissistic Los Angelenos." As for Disney . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 1999 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
It's no problem finding Harvey Weinstein at this or any other film festival. He's the turbulent center of an unruly crowd of journalists, holding an impromptu news conference about whatever new Miramax film he's most passionate about. The crowd formed on Friday afternoon outside a theater on the Rue d'Antibes, but the film in question, "Dogma," was a Miramax possession no longer. And therein lies a tale.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1999 | CLIFF ROTHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A press agent couldn't dream up "Dogma's" launch in New York. Its American debut at Lincoln Center on Monday night, as part of the New York Film Festival, arrives as the latest volley in an escalating holy war here over censorship in the arts. Censorship has been Topic A everywhere for the past week from the front pages to the local bar stools to the boardrooms.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2002 | From Associated Press
It doesn't sound like a big deal: a towel hung over a window to adjust the lighting during the shooting of a film. But for a follower of the "Dogma Vow of Chastity," it's a mortal sin. Now the founders of the strict rules for filmmaking that were introduced in 1995 admit they broke their own credo when they made the first of the movies that created a new genre.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2010 | By Steven Zeitchik, Los Angeles Times
Call it the most expensive cross-genre experiment in the history of Hollywood. The new Tom Cruise-Cameron Diaz film — perhaps the world's first screwball-comedy, action-romance, Hitchcock-homage, family-drama paranoid-thriller — went through so many script versions that even the writers who worked on earlier drafts may not recognize much about the final film. It has changed names (it was originally titled "Wichita," then "Trouble Man," then "Knight and Day"), stars (Eva Mendes and Chris Tucker were supposed to play the leads before Cruise and Diaz signed on)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 1999 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Kevin Smith is talking about the Catholic dogma of papal infallibility. He's fondly recounting how his eighth-grade religion teacher, Sister Theresa, sparked his hunger for deeper inquiry into topics like the lives of the saints and the Gnostic gospels. He's even talking--seriously--about becoming a deacon after his movie-making days are over so he can use his gift of gab to sell Jesus in a hip and passionate way.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1999 | CLIFF ROTHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A press agent couldn't dream up "Dogma's" launch in New York. Its American debut at Lincoln Center on Monday night, as part of the New York Film Festival, arrives as the latest volley in an escalating holy war here over censorship in the arts. Censorship has been Topic A everywhere for the past week from the front pages to the local bar stools to the boardrooms.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 1999 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
It's no problem finding Harvey Weinstein at this or any other film festival. He's the turbulent center of an unruly crowd of journalists, holding an impromptu news conference about whatever new Miramax film he's most passionate about. The crowd formed on Friday afternoon outside a theater on the Rue d'Antibes, but the film in question, "Dogma," was a Miramax possession no longer. And therein lies a tale.
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