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Doheny Eye Tissue Transplant Bank

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1998 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO
The Doheny Eye & Tissue Transplant Bank is conducting an extensive review to determine whether any of the hundreds of corneas it recovered without family permission from the Los Angeles County coroner's office were unfit for transplant.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1998 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Superior Court jury ruled Thursday that the county coroner and the Doheny Eye and Tissue Bank followed the law when they took a 17-year-old suicide victim's corneas without asking his parents. But even as the verdicts were being recorded in the closely watched case, jurors issued a rare statement asking officials to change their cornea harvesting practices to be more sensitive to relatives of the dead. The family of Richard Baltierra Jr.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1998 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO
The Doheny Eye & Tissue Transplant Bank is conducting an extensive review to determine whether any of the hundreds of corneas it recovered without family permission from the Los Angeles County coroner's office were unfit for transplant.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1998 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The lawyer for the father of a teenage suicide victim urged a Los Angeles Superior Court jury to award $1 million in damages because the county coroner's office and a private tissue bank took the dead boy's corneas despite his father's objection. Attorney Joel Warren told jurors in closing arguments Tuesday that the coroner's office and the Doheny Eye & Tissue Transplant Bank were "driven by the almighty dollar" to take corneas from the dead without asking permission from relatives.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 1997 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The number of corneas harvested from bodies at the Los Angeles County coroner's office dropped nearly 70% last month under a new policy that requires death investigators to contact family members for permission before removing the eye tissue, statistics released Tuesday show.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1997
Is the Los Angeles County coroner's office taking undue advantage of a state law that allows it to remove eye tissue from autopsy subjects without seeking permission from their families? Ask Yolanda Aguirre of El Monte or Frank Casias of Canoga Park. Each lost a grown child but did not know that the coroner had removed the corneas until they were contacted by The Times. They say that given the choice they would have refused.
NEWS
November 4, 1997 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles County coroner's office, responding to reports of ethical breaches and procedural lapses, announced Monday that it will no longer routinely permit a local eye bank to harvest corneas without the permission or knowledge of surviving family members. "The department as a whole will now take a proactive approach in making contact with families, to ensure that they're aware of any corneal removals," said Coroner Director Anthony T. Hernandez. "Basically, that's the bottom line."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1998 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The lawyer for the father of a teenage suicide victim urged a Los Angeles Superior Court jury to award $1 million in damages because the county coroner's office and a private tissue bank took the dead boy's corneas despite his father's objection. Attorney Joel Warren told jurors in closing arguments Tuesday that the coroner's office and the Doheny Eye & Tissue Transplant Bank were "driven by the almighty dollar" to take corneas from the dead without asking permission from relatives.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1998 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Richard Baltierra sought solace in the family photographs after his only son and namesake took his life with a shotgun two years ago. He would look into the shining brown eyes of the boy he had taken bowling and fishing and ask, "What was going through your mind?" But when Baltierra picked up the report of the autopsy two weeks after the death, he noticed a mysterious notation--"Corneas CGC24791.47."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1998 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Superior Court jury ruled Thursday that the county coroner and the Doheny Eye and Tissue Bank followed the law when they took a 17-year-old suicide victim's corneas without asking his parents. But even as the verdicts were being recorded in the closely watched case, jurors issued a rare statement asking officials to change their cornea harvesting practices to be more sensitive to relatives of the dead. The family of Richard Baltierra Jr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1998 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Richard Baltierra sought solace in the family photographs after his only son and namesake took his life with a shotgun two years ago. He would look into the shining brown eyes of the boy he had taken bowling and fishing and ask, "What was going through your mind?" But when Baltierra picked up the report of the autopsy two weeks after the death, he noticed a mysterious notation--"Corneas CGC24791.47."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1998 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO
The Doheny Eye & Tissue Transplant Bank is conducting an extensive review to determine whether any of the hundreds of corneas it recovered without family permission from the Los Angeles County coroner's office were unfit for transplant.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1998 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO
The Doheny Eye & Tissue Transplant Bank is conducting an extensive review to determine whether any of the hundreds of corneas it recovered without family permission from the Los Angeles County coroner's office were unfit for transplant.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 1997 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The number of corneas harvested from bodies at the Los Angeles County coroner's office dropped nearly 70% last month under a new policy that requires death investigators to contact family members for permission before removing the eye tissue, statistics released Tuesday show.
NEWS
November 4, 1997 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles County coroner's office, responding to reports of ethical breaches and procedural lapses, announced Monday that it will no longer routinely permit a local eye bank to harvest corneas without the permission or knowledge of surviving family members. "The department as a whole will now take a proactive approach in making contact with families, to ensure that they're aware of any corneal removals," said Coroner Director Anthony T. Hernandez. "Basically, that's the bottom line."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1997
Is the Los Angeles County coroner's office taking undue advantage of a state law that allows it to remove eye tissue from autopsy subjects without seeking permission from their families? Ask Yolanda Aguirre of El Monte or Frank Casias of Canoga Park. Each lost a grown child but did not know that the coroner had removed the corneas until they were contacted by The Times. They say that given the choice they would have refused.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1998 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles lawmaker introduced legislation Tuesday aimed at plugging a loophole that had allowed the Los Angeles County coroner's office to harvest thousands of corneas from cadavers without the consent of the next of kin. Democratic state Sen. Richard G. Polanco introduced the bill in response to The Times' disclosure that the coroner used an obscure "implied consent" law to let the Doheny Eye & Tissue Transplant Bank remove corneas from bodies without the knowledge of family members.
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