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Don Beebe

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SPORTS
October 15, 1989 | GENE WOJCIECHOWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The National Football League never had heard of Don Beebe until three years ago, when a scout pressed the stem of his stopwatch and then looked disbelievingly at the time. "Son," said Bill Giles, a field representatives for the National Football Scouting combine, "who are you?" Minutes earlier, Beebe had appeared at the Western Illinois University track in Macomb, Ill., for Giles' impromptu scouting session.
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SPORTS
September 30, 1997 | Associated Press
Don Beebe said that except for a sore neck and headache, he felt fine the day after getting knocked unconscious in Green Bay's game at Detroit. But the wide receiver implied that his wife would like him to retire. "I've done this before. If I was to have the same play tomorrow I'd do the same thing," Beebe said Monday. "I would try to catch the ball. That's my job. I have no fear, still, I have no fear. "As far as my attitude, my attitude hasn't changed any.
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SPORTS
January 30, 1993 | JOHN WEYLER
What's in store for the Bills if they return to Buffalo in a role other than three-time losers? "Well, for one, we wouldn't be able to get off the plane," receiver Don Beebe said. "And two, we wouldn't be able to get home from the airport for a couple of days." After the Bills beat Miami in the AFC championship game, thousands of fans greeted them in a snowstorm at the airport. "It was crazy," Beebe said. "As we drove out of the airport, they were pounding on my truck and screaming, 'Bee-Bee!
SPORTS
January 26, 1994 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Don Beebe, Buffalo Bills Dear Don: My son was out of control. I couldn't talk to him. I couldn't relate to him. Then, I used your play in the Super Bowl to show him what it took to play sports, how not to quit. Since then, I can talk to him again. Thank you, A Fan Leon Lett, Dallas Cowboys Leon: That's what Jimmy Johnson gets for drafting (racial epithet) like you. Unsigned Two letters, one sweet and one bitter. Two players, one a hero, the other a goat.
SPORTS
September 30, 1997 | Associated Press
Don Beebe said that except for a sore neck and headache, he felt fine the day after getting knocked unconscious in Green Bay's game at Detroit. But the wide receiver implied that his wife would like him to retire. "I've done this before. If I was to have the same play tomorrow I'd do the same thing," Beebe said Monday. "I would try to catch the ball. That's my job. I have no fear, still, I have no fear. "As far as my attitude, my attitude hasn't changed any.
SPORTS
January 30, 1993 | JOHN WEYLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He was John Jefferson back then, squaring off a pass pattern and making a spectacular one-handed catch in the corner of the end zone to win the Super Bowl in Pasadena. Well, it wasn't the corner of the end zone, it was the border of a back-yard garden. And maybe it was a suburb of Chicago, not Pasadena. And he was really 10-year-old Don Beebe, not John Jefferson. Beebe will be trying to make his childhood dream come true for the Buffalo Bills on Sunday in the Rose Bowl.
SPORTS
January 26, 1994 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Don Beebe, Buffalo Bills Dear Don: My son was out of control. I couldn't talk to him. I couldn't relate to him. Then, I used your play in the Super Bowl to show him what it took to play sports, how not to quit. Since then, I can talk to him again. Thank you, A Fan Leon Lett, Dallas Cowboys Leon: That's what Jimmy Johnson gets for drafting (racial epithet) like you. Unsigned Two letters, one sweet and one bitter. Two players, one a hero, the other a goat.
SPORTS
September 30, 2007 | Sam Farmer, Times Staff Writer
One football will be polished. The other is scuffed. One will be handled with kid gloves. The other has been smudged by kids' play. And, whereas one will reside behind glass at the Pro Football Hall of Fame, the other belongs to Kitrick Taylor, a little-known receiver who spent one season with the Green Bay Packers.
SPORTS
September 12, 1991 | TIM KAWAKAMI
Tailback Robert Delpino leads the NFC and is No. 2 in the NFL in total yards from scrimmage, with 319 (197 rushing, 122 receiving). Buffalo Bill running back Thurman Thomas leads with 410. Delpino also is tied with the 49ers' Jerry Rice for second in the league with three touchdowns. Buffalo's Don Beebe leads with four. . . . The Rams added center Trevor Ryals, who spent training camp with the team, to their practice squad.
SPORTS
January 31, 1994 | T.J. SIMERS, John Cherwa
Memories of Leon Lett haunted Dallas safety James Washington as he carried a Buffalo fumble 46 yards to the game-tying score. "The person I was looking for was (Don) Beebe," Washington said, laughing. "But he flew by me, and Thomas (Everett, Cowboy safety) took out two guys with blocks. All I had to do was keep running." Lett forced the fumble, a point Washington made to the assembled media again and again and again.
SPORTS
January 30, 1993 | JOHN WEYLER
What's in store for the Bills if they return to Buffalo in a role other than three-time losers? "Well, for one, we wouldn't be able to get off the plane," receiver Don Beebe said. "And two, we wouldn't be able to get home from the airport for a couple of days." After the Bills beat Miami in the AFC championship game, thousands of fans greeted them in a snowstorm at the airport. "It was crazy," Beebe said. "As we drove out of the airport, they were pounding on my truck and screaming, 'Bee-Bee!
SPORTS
January 30, 1993 | JOHN WEYLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He was John Jefferson back then, squaring off a pass pattern and making a spectacular one-handed catch in the corner of the end zone to win the Super Bowl in Pasadena. Well, it wasn't the corner of the end zone, it was the border of a back-yard garden. And maybe it was a suburb of Chicago, not Pasadena. And he was really 10-year-old Don Beebe, not John Jefferson. Beebe will be trying to make his childhood dream come true for the Buffalo Bills on Sunday in the Rose Bowl.
SPORTS
October 15, 1989 | GENE WOJCIECHOWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The National Football League never had heard of Don Beebe until three years ago, when a scout pressed the stem of his stopwatch and then looked disbelievingly at the time. "Son," said Bill Giles, a field representatives for the National Football Scouting combine, "who are you?" Minutes earlier, Beebe had appeared at the Western Illinois University track in Macomb, Ill., for Giles' impromptu scouting session.
SPORTS
January 9, 1997 | T.J. SIMERS
Quarterback Steve Beuerlein, backup to Carolina starter Kerry Collins, has been sacked in his previous tour of duties with the Raiders and Cowboys by Packer defensive lineman Reggie White. "The thing about Reggie White is that he doesn't hit you any harder than the other defensive linemen in this league," Beuerlein said. "Just more often." * The Panthers released wide receiver Don Beebe last February because he was bothered by sore ribs and could not demonstrate his value to the team.
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