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Don Cheadle

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 2013 | By Oliver Gettell
Being a television star isn't all wine and roses - at times, it can even be a bit embarrassing. Just ask Jake Johnson of "New Girl" or Don Cheadle of "House of Lies," two of the participants at a recent Envelope Emmy Roundtable on the subject of TV comedy. "They make me dance a lot," Johnson said of his role on "New Girl" as the aimless but lovable bartender Nick Miller. "I really don't like to. I'm not very good at it. " WATCH: The Envelope Emmy Roundtable | Comedy Johnson recalled one painful scene in which he danced to the Taylor Swift song "22" for 45 minutes.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
As this year's death-obsessed Emmy Awards broadcast took time to mention, Nov. 22 will mark 50 years since the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. The remembrance traveled from Walter Cronkite's announcement of the president's death to a Carrie Underwood cover of the Beatles' "Yesterday" to commemorate the band's 1964 debut on "The Ed Sullivan Show" - "two emotionally charged events, forever linked in our memories," said segment narrator Don Cheadle, who was born after both of them.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2012 | By Patrick Kevin Day and Amy Kaufman
To hear Don Cheadle tell it, he's a one-man TMZ episode waiting to happen. To celebrate his fifth Emmy nomination, the actor compares his phone exploding with calls this morning to another incident (of dubious authenticity). "It was like that time they found my car upside down in the canyon and I was like, 'No, guys, I was just drunk and walked away," Cheadle says by phone from the edge of his bed, where he spent the morning watching the British Open on TV. As for his nomination day celebration, Cheadle has more surprises up his sleeve.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2013 | By Glenn Whipp
Emmy voters continued to smile upon their favorite lead comedy actors, returning four of last year's nominees -- Alec Baldwin ("30 Rock"), Louis C.K. ("Louie"), Jim Parsons ("The Big Bang Theory") and Don Cheadle ("House of Lies") -- and welcoming back "Arrested Development" star Jason Bateman and past nominee Matt LeBlanc ("Episodes"). Jon Cryer, who won the Emmy in the category last year for "Two and a Half Men," was left out of the race altogether this year. Baldwin's nomination is his seventh for playing Jack Donaghy, "30 Rock's" high-achieving network executive.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2008 | Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune
"Traitor" asks a question that can be answered only by that cruel mistress, the marketplace: How much moral ambiguity and narrative intricacy will an audience handle in the realm of a terrorism-themed contemporary thriller? Enough, I hope, to respond to "Traitor." It tells a good, snakelike story, slithering in some unpredictable directions. All along the way, Don Cheadle, who plays the mysterious operative creating and running an espionage maze of his own design, reaffirms his excellence.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 1995 | KRISTINE McKENNA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Judging by the promotional poster for "Devil in a Blue Dress," director Carl Franklin's adaptation of Walter Mosley's novel of 1990, it's hard to imagine anyone upstaging Denzel Washington, who stars in the film. As reluctant gumshoe Easy Rawlins, he looks ridiculously handsome in his short fedora. Nonetheless, when actor Don Cheadle is on screen, Washington gets a run for the money.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2006 | Jennifer Frey, Washington Post
"Now, D.C. is Chocolate City, y'all know that, right?" booms the man in the navy blue leisure pants, long, belted vest and peach-toned long-sleeve shirt with the collar open wide. He's standing on the steps in front of the Ulysses S. Grant Memorial in sweltering midday heat, holding court before a crowd sporting a similar look: lots of polyester and plenty of towering Afros. "They want to keep us down because white folks are afraid of what's going to happen if we stand up!"
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 1998 | Ed Leibowitz, Ed Leibowitz is a writer based in Los Angeles
Starvation, sleeplessness, a mouthful of cotton balls and a bellyful of gin: Method actors have employed all of these well-worn tricks to goad themselves into character. Nevertheless, as a gang kingpin with a lousy conscience and a chronically upset stomach in Warren Beatty's political satire "Bulworth," Don Cheadle may lay claim as the only performer ever to ingest mass quantities of antacids. "The first few days, I was shooting real Rolaids," Cheadle admits.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 2007 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
TARAJI P. HENSON nearly steals the new film "Talk to Me," which opens Friday, with her no-holds-barred turn as Vernell, the former stripper girlfriend of Ralph Waldo "Petey" Greene Jr. (Don Cheadle), an ex-con who was a popular, albeit controversial DJ, TV personality and activist in Washington, D.C., in the late 1960s and 1970s. The 36-year-old actress recalls the moment she became one with the sassy Vernell. "We got to Toronto, where we filmed the movie," Henson relates. "We had a camera test.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2008 | Amy Kaufman, Special to The Times
Don CHEADLE has become adept at showing the duality of man. Consider: The same guy who serves as a tenacious political activist to end the civilian slaughters in Darfur can also be seen in Jimmy Kimmel's comic video in which the late-night TV host declares his love for Ben Affleck. This summer, Cheadle will star in "Traitor," in which he plays former U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2013 | By Mary McNamara
Comedy is hard, in large part because it's supposed to look easy. Carefully crafted sentences must be delivered with both precision timing and a sense of spontaneity; a double-take that looks rehearsed is just embarrassing. The performers who joined The Envelope's comedy panel this year represent the ever-widening range of the genre - from the indestructible "Two and a Half Men" to the darkly R-rated "House of Lies" - but all are masters of comedic effortlessness. When many were mourning the death of the sitcom, Jon Cryer, and his character Alan Harper, helped keep CBS' "Two and a Half Men" in the top spot even while former costar Charlie Sheen imploded and threatened to take the show with him (mercifully, he didn't.)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2013 | By Oliver Gettell
Ten seasons in and counting, the sitcom "Two and a Half Men" has proved remarkably popular and durable, even weathering the much-publicized firing of Charlie Sheen two years ago. At a recent Envelope Emmy Roundtable on the subject of TV comedy, even "Two and a Half Men's" own Jon Cryer seemed a bit surprised by the show's enduring appeal. WATCH: The Envelope Emmy Roundtable | Comedy Cryer joked that it might be the show's Everyman story that draws viewers. "We've all been there," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 2013 | By Oliver Gettell
Being a television star isn't all wine and roses - at times, it can even be a bit embarrassing. Just ask Jake Johnson of "New Girl" or Don Cheadle of "House of Lies," two of the participants at a recent Envelope Emmy Roundtable on the subject of TV comedy. "They make me dance a lot," Johnson said of his role on "New Girl" as the aimless but lovable bartender Nick Miller. "I really don't like to. I'm not very good at it. " WATCH: The Envelope Emmy Roundtable | Comedy Johnson recalled one painful scene in which he danced to the Taylor Swift song "22" for 45 minutes.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Batman's done it. Spider-Man too. Superman is about to try. As studios attempt to inject new life into overly familiar comic-book franchises, reboots - with changes in tone, directors and stars - are all the rage. But "Iron Man 3" proves there is more than one way to skin this particular cat. The story of "Iron Man 3" is a continuation of the previous two films, and its key cast is the same. But like a stunt driver taking over the wheel while the car is moving at 100 mph, new director (and co-writer)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2012 | By Patrick Kevin Day and Amy Kaufman
To hear Don Cheadle tell it, he's a one-man TMZ episode waiting to happen. To celebrate his fifth Emmy nomination, the actor compares his phone exploding with calls this morning to another incident (of dubious authenticity). "It was like that time they found my car upside down in the canyon and I was like, 'No, guys, I was just drunk and walked away," Cheadle says by phone from the edge of his bed, where he spent the morning watching the British Open on TV. As for his nomination day celebration, Cheadle has more surprises up his sleeve.
BUSINESS
July 6, 2012 | By Michelle Maltais
If you look at what's trending on Yahoo, you might think today is not just Fried Chicken Day  but also White People's Day. But before you pack up a picnic or go looking for the parade, that was actually two days ago, according to comedian Chris Rock.  In his typical in-your-face-manner, Rock sent out a provocative missive on Twitter for Independence Day that's stirring up a bit of chatter still on Friday. "Happy white peoples independence day the slaves weren't free but I'm sure they enjoyed fireworks," he tweeted.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2013 | By Oliver Gettell
Ten seasons in and counting, the sitcom "Two and a Half Men" has proved remarkably popular and durable, even weathering the much-publicized firing of Charlie Sheen two years ago. At a recent Envelope Emmy Roundtable on the subject of TV comedy, even "Two and a Half Men's" own Jon Cryer seemed a bit surprised by the show's enduring appeal. WATCH: The Envelope Emmy Roundtable | Comedy Cryer joked that it might be the show's Everyman story that draws viewers. "We've all been there," he said.
BUSINESS
July 6, 2012 | By Michelle Maltais
If you look at what's trending on Yahoo, you might think today is not just Fried Chicken Day  but also White People's Day. But before you pack up a picnic or go looking for the parade, that was actually two days ago, according to comedian Chris Rock.  In his typical in-your-face-manner, Rock sent out a provocative missive on Twitter for Independence Day that's stirring up a bit of chatter still on Friday. "Happy white peoples independence day the slaves weren't free but I'm sure they enjoyed fireworks," he tweeted.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2012 | By Greg Braxton, Los Angeles Times
From his Oscar-nominated performance in "Hotel Rwanda" to his boys-night-out turns in the "Ocean's 11" franchise, Don Cheadle has regularly earned praise for his diverse range. But he's never really gone full monty — until now. In the opening moments of "House of Lies," Showtime's new comedy about a hard-edged management consulting firm which premieres Jan. 8, Cheadle is lying in bed in all his birthday suit glory next to a naked woman. The actor knows the sight may catch some viewers by surprise.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2012 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
"House of Lies," which premieres Sunday, is a new series from Showtime about management consultants. The job is described as impossible to describe, but the general idea is that they're con artists who make troubled corporations dependent on their own company's advice. As legend-in-his-field Marty Kaan (Don Cheadle) puts it, the goal is to "make them think they can't live without us .... while we infect the host and bleed them dry. " Among other things, the show — based on a memoir by Marty Kihn, once head writer for VH1's "Pop-Up Videos" — seems to me a product of the knowledge that "Californication" can't last forever, and that it would be good for the network to have another male-targeted sex fantasy on hand when it goes.
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