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Don Drysdale

SPORTS
July 4, 1993
Career statistics for Dodger Hall of Fame pitcher Don Drysdale, who died Saturday at age 56: Year, Team G IP W-L Pct. H SO BB ERA 1956, Brooklyn 25 99 5-5 .500 163 80 68 3.33 1957, Brooklyn 34 221 17-9 .654 197 148 61 2.69 1958, Los Angeles 44 212 12-13 .480 214 131 72 4.16 1959, Los Angeles 44 271 17-13 .567 237 242 93 3.45 1960, Los Angeles 41 269 15-14 .517 214 246 72 2.84 1961, Los Angeles 40 244 13-10 .565 236 182 83 3.69 1962, Los Angeles 43 314 25-9 .735 272 232 78 2.
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SPORTS
July 4, 1993 | BILL PLASCHKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In August of 1969, Don Drysdale called an impromptu team meeting. He was not leaving before throwing one last inside fastball. He gathered his Dodger teammates, appropriately, in the food room next to the Dodger Stadium home clubhouse. It is a room with concrete floors and no windows, a place where you eat in your underwear. Drysdale's kind of room. First, he announced his retirement. Then he vowed that, while his right arm would be leaving, his legacy would remain.
SPORTS
July 4, 1993 | SCOTT MILLER
News of Don Drysdale's death moved through Anaheim Stadium on Saturday evening like one of the former Dodger great's pitches: Quickly and close enough to leave a lasting impression. "My heart goes out to Annie (Drysdale's wife, a former UCLA All-America basketball player) and his family," said Peter Ueberroth, former major league commissioner, who was in attendance at Saturday's Angels-Cleveland game. "When you consider husband and wife, they may be the most famous athletic family in America."
SPORTS
July 4, 1993 | DAN BERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was the middle of an otherwise routine Tuesday evening baseball game, Aug. 5, 1969, against the Pittsburgh Pirates, and the Dodgers' Don Drysdale was struggling. A young sportswriter working for the Associated Press sitting in the Dodger Stadium press box, I kept score as Drysdale gave up eight hits, including a home run to Manny Sanguillen, through the first six innings.
SPORTS
July 4, 1993 | MARYANN HUDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Don Drysdale wasn't on the Dodger bus that left for Olympic Stadium from the Le Sheraton Hotel at 5 p.m. Saturday, but it didn't concern his broadcast partners Vin Scully or Ross Porter. Sometimes Drysdale would take a taxi to the game, they said. As scheduled, the three were to split time between the Channel 5 telecast and the KABC radio broadcast for Saturday night's game between the Dodgers and the Montreal Expos. But when Drysdale wasn't at the park by 6 p.m., they became worried.
SPORTS
July 4, 1993 | MIKE DOWNEY
Don Drysdale--powerful, indestructible, larger-than-life Don Drysdale--is dead. God has given Roy Campanella someone to catch. One week after the death of the Dodger who dealt with physical adversity at its utmost comes the death of the Dodger who seemed most robust. "Big D," Donald Scott Drysdale, strode through life with an easy lope and a proud, upright carriage, giving no clue that his mortality was under attack from the inside-out.
SPORTS
July 4, 1993 | ROSS NEWHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The death of Don Drysdale Saturday, at 56, left former teammates, competitors and club officials--many still numbed by the recent passing of Roy Campanella--in shock and disbelief. Drysdale, with a 209-166 pitching record during his 14-year Hall of Fame career with the Brooklyn and Los Angeles Dodgers, was remembered as a fierce competitor who seldom missed a turn and a throwback to an era when games were decided on the field rather than the disabled list.
NEWS
July 4, 1993 | LARRY STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Don Drysdale, Hall of Fame pitcher and Dodger broadcaster, was found dead in his Montreal hotel room Saturday, apparently the victim of a heart attack. He was 56. During Drysdale's 14-year baseball career, the fierce 6-foot-6 right-hander, nicknamed "Big D," compiled a 209-166 record with a career earned-run average of 2.95. He pitched in five World Series and eight Major League All-Star games.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1993
The Los Angeles Unified School District stands to reap about $100,000 for tutorial programs and after-school activities from a charitable event sponsored by Los Angeles Dodgers broadcaster and Hall of Fame pitcher Don Drysdale. Drysdale, a Van Nuys High School graduate, announced Wednesday that the bulk of funds generated by his annual Hall of Fame Invitational Golf Tournament in November will be turned over to the public school system.
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