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Don Simpson

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 1985
Don Simpson appears to be a boorish creep ("Fastest Gums in the West," by David T. Friendly, Sept. 1), and as a struggling screenwriter I will have to be very, very, very lucky just to get the opportunity to kiss his gaudy ring and let him take credit for my ideas. Sometimes the only thing I dread more than failure in Hollywood is success in Hollywood and having to deal with people like him. TOM MATTHEWS Burbank
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2006 | Mary McNamara, Times Staff Writer
IN the public imagination, there are three kinds of successful producers -- the schemer, the screamer and the extremer. Certainly there are actual people who embody these characteristics -- uber-schmoozer Robert Evans is, as he lately informed us, still in the picture; Scott Rudin's assistant body count is legendary, and though Jerry Bruckheimer has calmed down significantly since the overdose death of partner Don Simpson, his name is still synonymous with the era of the Bad Boy.
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NEWS
August 18, 1996 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was no secret in Hollywood that producer Don Simpson had a drug problem. But the depth of his addiction was not revealed until the night he died. On Jan. 19, police discovered more than 2,200 pills and tablets stockpiled in alphabetical order in a bedroom closet next to the bathroom where Simpson's body was found.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 2003 | Chuck Philips, Times Staff Writer
A judge has reversed a state medical board ruling that revoked the license of a Westside psychiatrist for overprescribing addictive drugs to Hollywood producer Don Simpson, who died nearly eight years ago of an overdose. In a 42-page decision made public Thursday, Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Lloyd G. Connelly rejected the board's grounds for disciplining Dr. Nomi J. Fredrick -- and paved the way for the psychiatrist to practice medicine again. Fredrick lost her license Oct.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1996 | CHUCK PHILIPS and CARLA HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The narcotics division of the Los Angeles Police Department has launched an investigation into the death of movie producer Don Simpson after the discovery of thousands of prescription pills and capsules in his home. "The interior of the place looked like a pharmaceutical supply house," said Det. Brad Roberts, a homicide detective who visited Simpson's Bel-Air home about four hours after the producer's body was found Jan. 19. "There was a tremendous amount of prescription drugs on the property."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1999 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The state medical board has accused a second physician of overprescribing drugs to the late filmmaker Don Simpson, this time targeting a Santa Ana physician who officials say provided "large and frequent doses" of amphetamines to Simpson. The board's 42-page accusation, which seeks to revoke Dr. Leslie Eugene Wise's medical license, is scheduled to be heard by an administrative law judge in June.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1996 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Westside psychiatrist, a celebrity private detective, a top Hollywood producer and more than a dozen others conspired to cover up the circumstances surrounding the drug overdose of a doctor who died last year at filmmaker Don Simpson's Bel-Air home, a lawsuit filed Wednesday contends. The 48-page wrongful death complaint, filed in Los Angeles County Superior Court by the father and son of Dr. Stephen W.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1997 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eighteen months after the overdose death of Hollywood producer Don Simpson, the state Medical Board on Wednesday subpoenaed records from 15 doctors who treated the late filmmaker, law enforcement sources said.
BOOKS
April 26, 1998 | PETER BISKIND, Peter Biskind is the author of "Easy Riders, Raging Bulls: How the Sex-Drugs-and Rock 'n' Roll Generation Saved Hollywood."
There is an argument to be made that Don Simpson did more to change the face of American movies in the last few decades than anyone else, save George Lucas and Steven Spielberg. Critic David Denby, in a cri de coeur over the marginalization of reviewers and the death of film recently published in the New Yorker, wrote that what today's soulless movies lack is emotion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 2000 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly five years after the overdose death of Hollywood producer Don Simpson, the Medical Board of California has stripped a Westside psychiatrist of her medical license for overprescribing addictive drugs to Simpson and other patients. In a blistering 25-page decision, the board blasted Dr. Nomi J. Fredrick for being dishonest, incompetent and grossly negligent in prescribing morphine and other drugs to Simpson, a known drug abuser.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 2000 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly five years after the overdose death of Hollywood producer Don Simpson, the Medical Board of California has stripped a Westside psychiatrist of her medical license for overprescribing addictive drugs to Simpson and other patients. In a blistering 25-page decision, the board blasted Dr. Nomi J. Fredrick for being dishonest, incompetent and grossly negligent in prescribing morphine and other drugs to Simpson, a known drug abuser.
BUSINESS
November 19, 1999 | CLAUDIA ELLER
What part, if any, did Hollywood's social excess and heady, all-consuming business play in the apparent suicide of a former star agent who appeared to have it all--money, power, status and youth? It's a lingering question following the death of former wunderkind Jay Moloney, who was found hanged Tuesday morning in the shower of his Mulholland Drive house, just two days after his 35th birthday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1999 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Westside psychiatrist under investigation for allegedly over-medicating the late filmmaker Don Simpson recently prescribed large doses of narcotics to a patient diagnosed as suffering from anxiety, according to a complaint filed with the state Medical Board. The six-page consumer complaint, filed Friday by former patient Tim Obrenski, characterizes Dr. Nomi J.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1999 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The state medical board has accused a second physician of overprescribing drugs to the late filmmaker Don Simpson, this time targeting a Santa Ana physician who officials say provided "large and frequent doses" of amphetamines to Simpson. The board's 42-page accusation, which seeks to revoke Dr. Leslie Eugene Wise's medical license, is scheduled to be heard by an administrative law judge in June.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1999 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three years after the overdose death of Hollywood producer Don Simpson, the state Medical Board accused Westside psychiatrist Nomi Fredrick of overprescribing addictive drugs and enabling Simpson to persist in his substance abuse. On Wednesday, the California attorney general's office served a 90-page formal accusation on Fredrick seeking to revoke her medical license.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1998 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two and a half years after the overdose death of Hollywood producer Don Simpson, two Westside doctors who treated the filmmaker have been ordered to surrender his medical records to authorities. The order, issued by Los Angeles Superior Court Judge David A. Horowitz this week, comes after the California Medical Board sought unsuccessfully for a year to force psychiatrists Dr. Nomi J. Fredrick and Dr. Robert H. Gerner to turn over Simpson's medical records.
NEWS
January 20, 1996 | CHUCK PHILIPS and ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Don Simpson--a leading producer of such movies as "Top Gun" and "Crimson Tide," whose life was awash with stories of drug-laced parties in Hollywood's fast lane--was found dead at his home in Bel-Air on Friday. Police said the 52-year-old Oscar nominee's death appeared to be from natural causes. "They said there were no drugs around, no drug paraphernalia, nothing to show any drugs were involved," said Walter Shuster, a spokesman for the coroner's office.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1998 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two years after the overdose death of Hollywood producer Don Simpson, the state medical board has gone to court to force two Westside doctors who treated the late filmmaker to turn over his medical records. The move follows eight months of unsuccessful efforts by the board and the state attorney general's office to obtain records from Simpson's former psychiatrists, Dr. Nomi J. Fredrick and Dr. Robert H. Gerner.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 1998 | Amy Wallace, Amy Wallace is a Times staff writer
In the 1980s, Jerry Bruckheimer and his partner, Don Simpson, were the kings of commercial cinema. The two producers, whose relationship was so intertwined that Simpson once likened them to two people with one brain, made a string of blockbusters such as "Flash-dance" (1983), "Beverly Hills Cop" (1984) and "Top Gun" (1986). It was said that Simpson, a charismatic Alaskan who believed that he himself had the makings of a movie star, was the idea man.
BOOKS
April 26, 1998 | PETER BISKIND, Peter Biskind is the author of "Easy Riders, Raging Bulls: How the Sex-Drugs-and Rock 'n' Roll Generation Saved Hollywood."
There is an argument to be made that Don Simpson did more to change the face of American movies in the last few decades than anyone else, save George Lucas and Steven Spielberg. Critic David Denby, in a cri de coeur over the marginalization of reviewers and the death of film recently published in the New Yorker, wrote that what today's soulless movies lack is emotion.
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