Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsDon Wallace
IN THE NEWS

Don Wallace

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 1994
The Times' smug prediction of the certain winner of the 3rd District supervisor's race (Valley Newswatch, Jan. 3) left me questioning how fair your paper really is. Absent from the paragraph touting Zev Yaroslavsky as the sure winner in a campaign only insomniacs would love is any mention at all of Yaroslavsky's worthy opponent Don Wallace. Why was Wallace, who served nearly three years as field deputy for Supervisor Ed Edleman, completely ignored in the summary? Why weren't Wallace's credentials as a credible candidate sung as loudly as Yaroslavsky's?
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1994 | JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It says volumes about the 3rd District County Board of Supervisors race that political observers are not speculating about whether City Councilman Zev Yaroslavsky will win but who will run for his City Hall seat when he does, with his wife being one often-mentioned potential aspirant. "The only question is, does Zev get 65% of the vote or 80%?" said consultant Richard Lichtenstein. "The real focus is on who's going to be the next councilperson."
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 1992
I am outraged at the abusive verbal assault launched by Supervisor Edelman's field deputy, Don Wallace, on property owners who attended the Malibu Lakeside community planning meeting recently. Obviously, Wallace was not interested or incapable of recognizing "reasonable" solutions. Otherwise, he would have graciously thanked the attendees for their pertinent comments on the Planning Department's proposed Community Standards District. Instead, Mr. Wallace's autocratic response to very valid concerns was: "Don't tell us we need to be reasonable.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1994 | JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It says a lot about the 3rd District County Board of Supervisors race that observers are talking less about whether Los Angeles City Councilman Zev Yaroslavsky will win than they are about who will run for his City Hall seat when he does, with his wife mentioned as a possible aspirant. "The only question is, does Zev get 65% of the vote or 80%?" said political consultant Richard Lichtenstein. "The real focus is on who's going to be the next councilperson." In fact, the city Ethics Commission is being pressed by impatient City Council wanna-bes to set a date when they can start raising money to run for Yaroslavsky's 5th Council District seat.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1994 | JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If their official complaints are to be believed, political rivals Don Wallace, a retired fire captain, and Zev Yaroslavsky, a Los Angeles city councilman, spent their Memorial Day weekend toiling at either illegally posting political signs or illegally tearing them down.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1993 | JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pledging to bring a new spirit of reform to what he sees as a sleepy and fiscally careless county government, Los Angeles City Councilman Zev Yaroslavsky on Tuesday formally entered the race to succeed retiring Los Angeles County Supervisor Ed Edelman. "I am running because county government needs shaking up, and I intend to shake it up," the 44-year-old Yaroslavsky said at a news conference at the county Hall of Administration.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1994 | JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It says a lot about the 3rd District County Board of Supervisors race that observers are talking less about whether Los Angeles City Councilman Zev Yaroslavsky will win than they are about who will run for his City Hall seat when he does, with his wife mentioned as a possible aspirant. "The only question is, does Zev get 65% of the vote or 80%?" said political consultant Richard Lichtenstein. "The real focus is on who's going to be the next councilperson." In fact, the city Ethics Commission is being pressed by impatient City Council wanna-bes to set a date when they can start raising money to run for Yaroslavsky's 5th Council District seat.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1994 | JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It says volumes about the 3rd District County Board of Supervisors race that political observers are not speculating about whether City Councilman Zev Yaroslavsky will win but who will run for his City Hall seat when he does, with his wife being one often-mentioned potential aspirant. "The only question is, does Zev get 65% of the vote or 80%?" said consultant Richard Lichtenstein. "The real focus is on who's going to be the next councilperson."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1988 | BILL BOYARSKY, Times City-County Bureau Chief
In January, seven neighborhood rebels maneuvered their vehicles around a sharp Santa Monica Mountains canyon curve, parked near a horse trailer and walked through the chilly air to a simple but substantial frame house, where an intense man waited for them.
NEWS
May 27, 1985 | DARYL KELLEY, Times Staff Writer
Don C. Wallace, a pioneer in radio communications and dean of the country's long-distance amateur radio operators, died Saturday in Long Beach after suffering a stroke. He was 86. From his "antenna ranch" atop a ridge on the Palos Verdes Peninsula, Wallace had been in touch with more people in more countries than any other ham operator in the world since 1955, colleagues said Sunday. "He was the No. 1 man, No. 1 in the world," said Lloyd Colvin of Richmond, Calif.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1994 | JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If their official complaints are to be believed, political rivals Don Wallace, a retired fire captain, and Zev Yaroslavsky, a Los Angeles city councilman, spent their Memorial Day weekend toiling at either illegally posting political signs or illegally tearing them down.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 1994
The Times' smug prediction of the certain winner of the 3rd District supervisor's race (Valley Newswatch, Jan. 3) left me questioning how fair your paper really is. Absent from the paragraph touting Zev Yaroslavsky as the sure winner in a campaign only insomniacs would love is any mention at all of Yaroslavsky's worthy opponent Don Wallace. Why was Wallace, who served nearly three years as field deputy for Supervisor Ed Edleman, completely ignored in the summary? Why weren't Wallace's credentials as a credible candidate sung as loudly as Yaroslavsky's?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1993 | JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pledging to bring a new spirit of reform to what he sees as a sleepy and fiscally careless county government, Los Angeles City Councilman Zev Yaroslavsky on Tuesday formally entered the race to succeed retiring Los Angeles County Supervisor Ed Edelman. "I am running because county government needs shaking up, and I intend to shake it up," the 44-year-old Yaroslavsky said at a news conference at the county Hall of Administration.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 1992
I am outraged at the abusive verbal assault launched by Supervisor Edelman's field deputy, Don Wallace, on property owners who attended the Malibu Lakeside community planning meeting recently. Obviously, Wallace was not interested or incapable of recognizing "reasonable" solutions. Otherwise, he would have graciously thanked the attendees for their pertinent comments on the Planning Department's proposed Community Standards District. Instead, Mr. Wallace's autocratic response to very valid concerns was: "Don't tell us we need to be reasonable.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1988 | BILL BOYARSKY, Times City-County Bureau Chief
In January, seven neighborhood rebels maneuvered their vehicles around a sharp Santa Monica Mountains canyon curve, parked near a horse trailer and walked through the chilly air to a simple but substantial frame house, where an intense man waited for them.
NEWS
June 2, 1985 | GERALD FARIS, Times Staff Writer
The Wallace Ranch on Highridge Road will continue to sprout its extraordinary crop--towering radio antennas with access to the entire world--even though the man who made the whole thing run is gone. "This station will stay intact for at least a year," said William Wallace, sipping coffee a few days ago in a kitchen a few feet away from an enormous array of radio equipment, files, memorabilia and overhead wires running every which way.
NEWS
June 2, 1985 | GERALD FARIS, Times Staff Writer
The Wallace Ranch on Highridge Road will continue to sprout its extraordinary crop--towering radio antennas with access to the entire world--even though the man who made the whole thing run is gone. "This station will stay intact for at least a year," said William Wallace, sipping coffee a few days ago in a kitchen a few feet away from an enormous array of radio equipment, files, memorabilia and overhead wires running every which way.
SPORTS
December 16, 2008 | ERIC SONDHEIMER, Sondheimer is a Times staff writer.
Seven years ago, only weeks after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, Long Beach Poly and Concord De La Salle played a football game that changed high school sports forever. De La Salle came in ranked No. 2 in the nation and owning a 116-game win streak. Poly was ranked No. 1 and boasted one of the most talent-laden teams in Southland history.
NEWS
May 27, 1985 | DARYL KELLEY, Times Staff Writer
Don C. Wallace, a pioneer in radio communications and dean of the country's long-distance amateur radio operators, died Saturday in Long Beach after suffering a stroke. He was 86. From his "antenna ranch" atop a ridge on the Palos Verdes Peninsula, Wallace had been in touch with more people in more countries than any other ham operator in the world since 1955, colleagues said Sunday. "He was the No. 1 man, No. 1 in the world," said Lloyd Colvin of Richmond, Calif.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|