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NEWS
June 5, 1987 | United Press International
President Reagan announced today that he will nominate business executive T. Allan McArtor to head the Federal Aviation Administration, the agency charged with keeping the nation's skies safe. McArtor, 44, a vice president of Federal Express and an Air Force veteran of the Vietnam War, would succeed Donald D. Engen in the top FAA post. Engen, 62, is leaving the agency in July to take a job in private business.
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NEWS
September 10, 1985 | (UPI)
The Federal Aviation Administration announced Monday that it will not require domestic airlines to use anti-misting kerosene because the treated fuel failed to control a fire after a demonstration crash. FAA Administrator Donald D. Engen said the decision not to proceed with the government rule was based on last December's test crash of a four-engine jet at Edwards Air Force Base in California. The plane burst into flames despite the presence of the anti-misting additive.
NEWS
August 12, 1985
The nation's air traffic control system is safe even though there are more flights and fewer experienced controllers monitoring takeoffs and landings, Donald D. Engen, administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration, said on the CBS program "Face the Nation." Rep. Guy V. Molinari (R-N.Y.), a member of the House aviation subcommittee who also appeared on the program, disagreed with Engen's assessment.
NEWS
June 1, 1987
The U.S. commercial aviation system is safe despite reports of increasing numbers of near mid-air collisions, the head of the Federal Aviation Administration said. "There are too many airplanes for the facilities available at which to land, and we do need more airports," Donald D. Engen said on ABC's "This Week With David Brinkley." However, Jim Burnett, chairman of the National Transportation Safety Board, blasted the FAA for refusing to limit the number of flights in rush hours.
NEWS
November 14, 1985 | United Press International
Seventy-eight members of Congress urged President Reagan today to rehire some of the air traffic controllers fired in 1981 during an illegal strike. Rep. Guy V. Molinari (R-N.Y.), in releasing a letter at a news conference said, "We are concerned about the very serious lack of experience in our current controller work force and a steadily diminishing level of safety." President Reagan, Transportation Secretary Elizabeth Hanford Dole and Federal Aviation Administration chief Donald D.
NEWS
April 1, 1987 | United Press International
Federal Express executive Allan McArtor will be nominated by President Reagan to replace Donald D. Engen as head of the Federal Aviation Administration, aviation sources said Tuesday night. McArtor, 44, is a senior vice president of telecommunications with Federal Express, which is based in Memphis, Tenn. McArtor said Tuesday night in a telephone conversation from his Memphis home that "I am a candidate for this position to succeed Don Engen." FAA officials declined comment.
NEWS
June 7, 1985 | United Press International
The head of the Federal Aviation Administration assured travelers today they're not playing "Russian roulette" when boarding a plane despite a record 592 near-collisions in midair in 1984 that prompted safety concerns. At the same time, FAA Administrator Donald D. Engen said he will appoint an independent auditor to make sure that the agency is compiling a complete record of the incidents. Engen also disclosed that he is considering changing the official definition of a near-miss.
NEWS
September 1, 1986
Donald D. Engen, administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration, said that all FAA employees who fly, control or work on airliners will be tested for drugs when they are hired, and again when they take their annual physical examinations. "I have had a (testing) plan in being for the last year and a half. I didn't have the money earlier this year; I do now. And we are implementing the plan this year," Engen said on ABC television's "This Week With David Brinkley."
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