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March 18, 1987 | Associated Press
Donald Engen, who has led the Federal Aviation Administration during three of the airline industry's most tumultuous years, announced today that he is resigning and will return to private business. Engen, 62, gave no reason for his decision to leave the agency, which regulates airline safety, in July, except to say he plans to end four decades of government service and work "in the best interests of aviation" outside the government. He has been FAA administrator since April, 1984.
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NEWS
March 18, 1987 | Associated Press
Donald Engen, who has led the Federal Aviation Administration during three of the airline industry's most tumultuous years, announced today that he is resigning and will return to private business. Engen, 62, gave no reason for his decision to leave the agency, which regulates airline safety, in July, except to say he plans to end four decades of government service and work "in the best interests of aviation" outside the government. He has been FAA administrator since April, 1984.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1987 | GEORGE STEIN, Times Staff Writer
The head of the Federal Aviation Administration has singled out Los Angeles City Atty. James K. Hahn as an example of local authorities improperly meddling in the operation of the nation's aviation system. Hahn, whose office has expanded criminal investigations against pilots following the Aug. 31 Cerritos air disaster, said through a spokesman that his office will continue criminal prosecutions against pilots flying recklessly or carelessly "with or without the cooperation" of the FAA.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1987 | GEORGE STEIN, Times Staff Writer
The head of the Federal Aviation Administration has singled out Los Angeles City Atty. James K. Hahn as an example of local authorities improperly meddling in the operation of the nation's aviation system. Hahn, whose office has expanded criminal investigations against pilots following the Aug. 31 Cerritos air disaster, said through a spokesman that his office will continue criminal prosecutions against pilots flying recklessly or carelessly "with or without the cooperation" of the FAA.
NEWS
March 26, 1985
The Federal Aviation Administration said it will seek to reduce flight delays this summer--starting April 28 with Daylight Saving Time--by using new air traffic procedures that allow more precise control of aircraft flow and by persuading airlines not to bunch flights during peak travel periods.
NEWS
August 29, 1986
The Federal Aviation Administration said it has cleared and reinstated three of the 34 Southern California air traffic controllers who were removed from their jobs during an investigation of off-duty drug use. The agency said it plans to reveal the rest of the results of its investigation at a press conference Tuesday. The controllers, who work at the Los Angeles Air Route Traffic Center in Palmdale, were reassigned on Aug.
NEWS
September 18, 1986 | From a Times Staff Writer
Prompted by the collision of a private plane and an Aeromexico DC-9 over Cerritos on Aug. 31, the Federal Aviation Administration said Wednesday that it is initiating a formal review of the terminal-controlled airspace at the nation's major airports, including Los Angeles International Airport. The report, which FAA Administrator Donald D. Engen wants completed by Oct. 15, will examine such factors as the amount of traffic, number of flight infractions and past enforcement efforts.
NEWS
September 19, 1986 | United Press International
The government will order the nation's airlines to install collision avoidance systems aboard their planes in a move that could make flying safer, Federal Aviation Administration chief Donald D. Engen said today. Engen said the Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance System--TCAS--would reduce the chances of in-flight collisions. The system can alert the pilot of an impending collision and advise whether the plane should go up or down to avoid it.
NEWS
April 28, 1987
The head of the National Transportation Safety Board said that in order to ensure air safety during the peak summer travel season that begins June 1, the government must cut the number of flights the airlines are permitted to operate. Chairman Jim Burnett said that a forced reduction in the number of flights is a necessary short-term step to offset the recent rise in air traffic controller errors and near collisions. In response, FAA chief Donald D.
NEWS
April 23, 1987
The head of the Federal Aviation Administration said he has organized a special task force to determine why mistakes by air-traffic controllers have risen this year. The number of controller errors rose 18% during the first three months of this year compared to the same period in 1986. The agency had anticipated that errors would be reduced by at least 2% during this period. FAA Administrator Donald D.
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