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Donald Jr Hill Williams

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BUSINESS
March 16, 1993 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During the three years before Hill Williams Development Corp. filed for liquidation in U.S. Bankruptcy Court, the Anaheim-based company and its executives contributed nearly $55,000 to political candidates, including former President George Bush and several Anaheim City Council members. Of that total, $35,000--including a $15,000 donation to Bush--was made during a single week in March, 1992.
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BUSINESS
March 22, 1993 | SUSAN CHRISTIAN and GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Rob Peterson stood at his second-floor office window one morning last fall watching people, most of them elderly, board a bus outside the lobby of Hill Williams Development Corp. Within minutes, founder Donald Hill Williams Jr. would be treating yet another group of prospective investors to a tour of his company's desert properties, telling them how their dollars could turn the raw land into planned communities. "I felt sick to my stomach," Peterson said. "The people looked so vulnerable."
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BUSINESS
March 22, 1993 | SUSAN CHRISTIAN and GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Rob Peterson stood at his second-floor office window one morning last fall watching people, most of them elderly, board a bus outside the lobby of Hill Williams Development Corp. Within minutes, founder Donald Hill Williams Jr. would be treating yet another group of prospective investors to a tour of his company's desert properties, telling them how their dollars could turn the raw land into planned communities. "I felt sick to my stomach," Peterson said. "The people looked so vulnerable."
BUSINESS
March 16, 1993 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During the three years before Hill Williams Development Corp. filed for liquidation in U.S. Bankruptcy Court, the Anaheim-based company and its executives contributed nearly $55,000 to political candidates, including former President George Bush and several Anaheim City Council members. Of that total, $35,000--including a $15,000 donation to Bush--was made during a single week in March, 1992.
BUSINESS
March 16, 1993 | DALLAS M. JACKSON
Definition: A fraudulent operation in which early investors are paid with money from new investors. Inducement is a promised high rate of return. History: In Boston in 1927, Charles Ponzi concocted a mail fraud in which he said he would pay investors $1.30 for each dollar they invested. He claimed to make money playing fluctuation in overseas postage rates, but he actually paid his longtime investors with money obtained from new investors. Ponzi took in more than $8 million in 13 months.
BUSINESS
March 16, 1993 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Anaheim City Councilman William D. Ehrle met Donald Hill Williams Jr. in 1987, the conversation focused on ethics, values and the role of churches in Southern California. At the time, Williams and other members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints were lobbying Anaheim council members for support of a church they hoped to build in Anaheim--a church that was, in fact, built and that Williams later attended.
BUSINESS
March 16, 1993 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Troubled real estate investment companies appear like clockwork in Southern California, says an investor who is the author of "Smart Trust Deed Investment in California." "I've been watching the real estate business for over 20 years, and it seems like every five years we go through (an investment scam) cycle," said George Coats, who is based in West Covina. "Except that now, the cycle seems to be every two or three years."
BUSINESS
March 16, 1993 | DALLAS M. JACKSON
Definition: A fraudulent operation in which early investors are paid with money from new investors. Inducement is a promised high rate of return. History: In Boston in 1927, Charles Ponzi concocted a mail fraud in which he said he would pay investors $1.30 for each dollar they invested. He claimed to make money playing fluctuation in overseas postage rates, but he actually paid his longtime investors with money obtained from new investors. Ponzi took in more than $8 million in 13 months.
BUSINESS
March 16, 1993 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Anaheim City Councilman William D. Ehrle met Donald Hill Williams Jr. in 1987, the conversation focused on ethics, values and the role of churches in Southern California. At the time, Williams and other members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints were lobbying Anaheim council members for support of a church they hoped to build in Anaheim--a church that was, in fact, built and that Williams later attended.
BUSINESS
March 16, 1993 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Troubled real estate investment companies appear like clockwork in Southern California, says an investor who is the author of "Smart Trust Deed Investment in California." "I've been watching the real estate business for over 20 years, and it seems like every five years we go through (an investment scam) cycle," said George Coats, who is based in West Covina. "Except that now, the cycle seems to be every two or three years."
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