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Donald Woods

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Donald Woods, the South African newspaper editor and apartheid opponent whose activism was chronicled in the movie "Cry Freedom," died Sunday after a long battle with cancer. He was 67. Woods, the editor of the Daily Dispatch in East London, South Africa, from 1965 to 1977, died at the Royal Marsden hospital in Sutton, just south of London. His eldest daughter, Jane, said inoperable cancer had been found in his liver three weeks ago.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Donald Woods, the South African newspaper editor and apartheid opponent whose activism was chronicled in the movie "Cry Freedom," died Sunday after a long battle with cancer. He was 67. Woods, the editor of the Daily Dispatch in East London, South Africa, from 1965 to 1977, died at the Royal Marsden hospital in Sutton, just south of London. His eldest daughter, Jane, said inoperable cancer had been found in his liver three weeks ago.
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NEWS
April 25, 1998
Donald Woods, 91, a prolific actor who referred to himself as the "king of the Bs." Born Ralph L. Zink in Manitoba, Canada, he legally switched to his professional name of Donald Woods in 1945. After growing up in Burbank and attending UC Berkeley, Woods started out as a radio and stage actor.
NEWS
April 25, 1998
Donald Woods, 91, a prolific actor who referred to himself as the "king of the Bs." Born Ralph L. Zink in Manitoba, Canada, he legally switched to his professional name of Donald Woods in 1945. After growing up in Burbank and attending UC Berkeley, Woods started out as a radio and stage actor.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prints of the anti-apartheid film "Cry Freedom," seized by police from 30 South African theaters on its opening day in July, 1988, have been returned and the distributing company said Monday it will re-release the film April 27, nearly two years after its originally scheduled premiere. United International Pictures, the film's distributor here, said in a statement that it saw no remaining obstacles to the nationwide release of "Cry Freedom."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 1988 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
The South African government plans to take a further look at the anti-apartheid film "Cry Freedom" before deciding whether it can be shown in this country. Although government censors cleared the film without restrictions several months ago, that decision is being reviewed by officials of the ruling National Party.
NEWS
June 4, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Service Reports
South African journalist Donald Woods says the United States suffers from a "cult of conservative selfishness" that propels "salesmen" into public office. Woods, who wrote the biography of anti-apartheid activist Steven Biko, gave the keynote address Saturday on the Boston campus of the University of Massachusetts. Woods, who lived in exile for 12 years, said American economic sanctions against his homeland contributed in part to Nelson R. Mandela's release.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 1988 | DEBORAH CAULFIELD, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Legal action will be taken against Johannesburg newspapers that advertised director Richard Attenborough's anti-apartheid film, "Cry Freedom," even though it was approved for exhibition by South African censors.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 1988 | JOHN VOLAND and DEBORAH CAULFIELD, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
After months of delays and official threats, Sir Richard Attenborough's film "Cry Freedom"--documenting the death of black student leader Steven Biko and the persecution of white publisher Donald Woods--will be released in South Africa next month, the distributors said Tuesday. Peter Dignan, managing director of United International Pictures South Africa, said the decision to release the film was made after meetings with senior management in London.
NEWS
October 22, 1995
I watched the first two episodes of "JAG" (NBC, Saturdays) and found them quite entertaining. However, something has occurred more than once in each show that simply makes me cringe. This "something" is when the actors salute each other when they are not covered (do not have a hat on). Unless the rules have changed since I was in the U.S. Navy, which I sincerely doubt, I wish that they would stop this non-naval practice. Donald Edward Woods, Fountain Valley
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prints of the anti-apartheid film "Cry Freedom," seized by police from 30 South African theaters on its opening day in July, 1988, have been returned and the distributing company said Monday it will re-release the film April 27, nearly two years after its originally scheduled premiere. United International Pictures, the film's distributor here, said in a statement that it saw no remaining obstacles to the nationwide release of "Cry Freedom."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 1988 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
The South African government plans to take a further look at the anti-apartheid film "Cry Freedom" before deciding whether it can be shown in this country. Although government censors cleared the film without restrictions several months ago, that decision is being reviewed by officials of the ruling National Party.
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