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Donna Murphy

ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1996 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Rent" and "Bring In 'Da Noise, Bring In 'Da Funk" top the list of shows nominated for Broadway's Tony Awards announced Monday, with 10 nods for "Rent" and nine for "Noise." "Seven Guitars," a Center Theatre Group co-production that played the Ahmanson Theatre earlier this year, garnered eight Tony nominations--more than any other nonmusical play. Also snagging eight was the recent revival of "The King and I."
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 1996 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
HBO continued its long-standing domination of the CableACE Awards over the weekend, garnering more than a third of cable TV's programming honors presented at the 18th annual event. The pay service's parade included a fifth consecutive comedy series win for "The Larry Sanders Show" and three awards for the Emmy-winning movie "Truman."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 1998 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Historians have suggested that schoolteacher Anna Leonowens exaggerated the importance of her role to the king of Siam in her books, which became a novel and then became the musical "The King and I." No matter. The woman who emerges as Anna in the classic Rodgers and Hammerstein musical is the embodiment of tact, worldliness and compassion, a woman who knew when to fight and when to hold her tongue and be gracious.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2001 | ALLAN JOHNSON, CHICAGO TRIBUNE
Friday is "tape night" for dozens of situation comedies around the Los Angeles area. The sights on this particular sound stage are no different, except that it is on the West Side of Chicago--not the Westside of Los Angeles. And that's just where the star of "The Joan Cusack Show" wants it to be, even if it does make a little history in the process as the first network television sitcom to be taped entirely in Chicago.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 1999 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rand Ravich's "The Astronaut's Wife" is a moderately diverting thriller that builds suspense and entertains effectively--but don't ask any more of this sleek, costly production, whose strongest selling point is Charlize Theron. Since her debut in "2 Days in the Valley" she's appeared in a string of major features, but it's surprising that so early on in her career she's able to carry so big a picture with ease and finesse.
NEWS
November 5, 2000 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Showtime's political thriller, "The Last Debate," sets up a terrific "what if" premise: Journalists serving on a presidential debate panel throw out the rules to favor the candidate they feel should be elected. Then what happens? In the mystery that airs Sunday--two days before the presidential election-- four journalists from print, radio and television try to change the course of American history by influencing the presidential elections.
NEWS
September 15, 1996 | KATHLEEN CRAUGHWELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
PBS programming has a decidedly historical cast this fall, from a Ken Burns-style look at the settling of the American West to an eight-part documentary on the effects of World War I on the global psyche, plus biographies on such notable 20th century figures as Albert Einstein and Theodore Roosevelt.
NEWS
September 29, 1996 | STEVEN LINAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sunday / "Once a Thief" 8 p.m. Fox John Woo ("Broken Arrow") directs this misfired TV movie, an unsold pilot for a series. Initially set in Hong Kong, the story centers on two lovers (Ivan Sergei and Sandrine Holt) separated while fleeing the crime lord (Robert Ito) who trained them as thieves. Reunited in Vancouver, Sergei and Holt are teamed with a former cop (Nicholas Lea, the treacherous Krycek of "The X-Files") by the head (Jennifer Dale) of an international crime-fighting unit.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 1997 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The actor playing Anna in "The King and I" need not be a singer. Consider Gertrude Lawrence, who originated the role in 1951 on Broadway. She was not much of a singer. Nor was Deborah Kerr, whose songs in the 1956 film version of the Richard Rodgers-Oscar Hammerstein musical were dubbed by Marni Nixon. In fact, the show is famous for making a star out of that least of singers, Yul Brynner, who not only originated the role of the King of Siam but seemed to make it his life's work.
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