Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsDonna Murphy
IN THE NEWS

Donna Murphy

NEWS
September 29, 1996 | STEVEN LINAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sunday / "Once a Thief" 8 p.m. Fox John Woo ("Broken Arrow") directs this misfired TV movie, an unsold pilot for a series. Initially set in Hong Kong, the story centers on two lovers (Ivan Sergei and Sandrine Holt) separated while fleeing the crime lord (Robert Ito) who trained them as thieves. Reunited in Vancouver, Sergei and Holt are teamed with a former cop (Nicholas Lea, the treacherous Krycek of "The X-Files") by the head (Jennifer Dale) of an international crime-fighting unit.
Advertisement
NEWS
November 5, 2000 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Showtime's political thriller, "The Last Debate," sets up a terrific "what if" premise: Journalists serving on a presidential debate panel throw out the rules to favor the candidate they feel should be elected. Then what happens? In the mystery that airs Sunday--two days before the presidential election-- four journalists from print, radio and television try to change the course of American history by influencing the presidential elections.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 1997 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The actor playing Anna in "The King and I" need not be a singer. Consider Gertrude Lawrence, who originated the role in 1951 on Broadway. She was not much of a singer. Nor was Deborah Kerr, whose songs in the 1956 film version of the Richard Rodgers-Oscar Hammerstein musical were dubbed by Marni Nixon. In fact, the show is famous for making a star out of that least of singers, Yul Brynner, who not only originated the role of the King of Siam but seemed to make it his life's work.
NEWS
September 15, 1996 | KATHLEEN CRAUGHWELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
PBS programming has a decidedly historical cast this fall, from a Ken Burns-style look at the settling of the American West to an eight-part documentary on the effects of World War I on the global psyche, plus biographies on such notable 20th century figures as Albert Einstein and Theodore Roosevelt.
NEWS
March 30, 1997 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
American Movie Classics' "Remember WENN" might best be described as the little series that could. Everything about the show defies current television conventions. It's a half-hour comedy on a channel that otherwise shows old movies. It's a period piece, set in the 1940s. Its ensemble cast doesn't feature any stars. It goes for whimsical humor rather than for guffaws. It doesn't have a laugh track or a cynical bone in its body.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2011 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Maybe this year will surprise us, but if they're taking bets in Vegas on the Tonys, let's throw our 401(k)s down and retire early to Montecito. "The Book of Mormon," nominated for 14 awards, is going to need a U-Haul. "War Horse," the odds-on favorite in the drama category, has lost some steam coming down the stretch, so the final moments of Sunday's telecast shouldn't be completely devoid of suspense. I'm most curious about the best lead actor in a play race. Any chance of a five-way tie?
NEWS
April 12, 1998 | STEVEN LINAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"The Day Lincoln Was Shot" / 5, 7 and 9 p.m. TNT The most interesting aspect of this sluggish cable drama is the crack casting of gaunt, gravel-voiced Lance Henriksen as the nation's 16th president. With dark whiskers and stovepipe hat, the "Millennium" star is a dead-ringer--no pun intended--for the chief executive shot by actor John Wilkes Booth (Rob Morrow) at Ford's Theatre on April 14, 1865.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2010 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
For "Tangled," the studio's 50th feature-length cartoon, the team at Disney has taken a deep breath and tried to be all things to all animation-loving people. There are some hiccups along the way, but by the end there is success. Whether you like stirring adventure or sentimental romance, traditional fairy tales or stories of modern families, musicals or comedies, even blonds or brunets, "Tangled" has something for you. Sampling so many animation touchstones has its risks, but once "Tangled" calms down and accepts the essential sweetness of its better nature the rewards are clear.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2007 | Charles McNulty, Times Staff Writer
IF there's any doubt that we're living in a golden age of creative nonfiction, the nominations for this year's Tonys, which will be awarded tonight, should squelch it. Have there ever been more actors nominated for playing real-life characters? Glancing through the names of performers and parts, one could be forgiven for thinking that the Biography Channel had recently been hijacked by a squadron of Broadway all-stars.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|