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ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1991 | JEAN ROSENBLUTH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
They called him Mellow Yellow, and quite rightly. During his mid-'60s heyday, Donovan was the Phil Collins of flower power, a British import who captivated America with a string of mild-mannered, daydream-like rockers. After two decades away from the public eye and ear, Donovan (real name: Donovan Leitch) is enjoying a revival of sorts in England, thanks primarily to--of all things--the Happy Mondays.
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NEWS
February 21, 2002
8pm Pop Music Reclusive singer-guitarist J.J. Cale is identified with the Tulsa, Okla., music scene that produced him and such early '60s cohorts as Leon Russell, but Cale's show at the Roxy is a homecoming of sorts. During a mid-'60s L.A. sojourn, the musician was a regular at the Roxy's sister club, the Whisky a Go-Go. So, who knows, maybe among his songs, including the Eric Clapton hits "After Midnight" and "Cocaine," he'll work in a tune from his 1966 album "Take a Trip Down Sunset Strip."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 1989 | TERRY ATKINSON
Movies "The Brat Pack Goes West" might have made a nice subtitle for "Young Guns" (Vestron, $89.95, R). Starring Emilio Estevez, Kiefer Sutherland, Charlie Sheen and Lou Diamond Phillips (as well as old guns Jack Palance and Terence Stamp), this Western about six desperadoes led by Billy the Kid fared poorly with most critics but scooped up $42 million at the box office. A rare and pretty-much-bungled attempt to deal with metaphysics in a major motion picture, "Vibes" (RCA/Columbia, $89.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2007 | Jenny Sundel
TIM ROBBINS took his antiwar message to the stage Aug. 18 with a reading of "The Trial of the Catonsville Nine," benefiting the Actors' Gang and Office of the Americas, a nonprofit group that promotes peace and international justice. Sharon Stone and Jeremy Piven slipped into their seats at the Kirk Douglas Theater for the sold-out show, where 1. Neil Patrick Harris showed off his theater chops alongside the big-name cast. After a standing ovation, 2.
NEWS
February 25, 1991 | JEANNINE STEIN
The Scene: West Coast premiere and party for "Superstar: The Life and Times of Andy Warhol," a new Chuck Workman documentary about the enigmatic artist and pop culture guru. Former Warhol-ites, artists and industry types saw the film at the Music Hall in Beverly Hills, then commuted to Asylum, the latest in upscale restaurant/lounge/nightclubs. It benefited the Hollywood Policy Center's Freedom of Expression Project, combating censorship in the arts and media.
NEWS
April 21, 1991 | JEANNINE STEIN
A young woman with jet-black hair, a nose ring and a pierced belly button (an inny with a ring through it) sits with friends at the bar at Small's and discusses the merits of having a likeness of Bart Simpson holding a peace sign tattooed somewhere on her body. She leans across the bar and says, "Hi," to a friend and asks him, "Do I look like I've been here for a long time?" "No," he replies, "you just kind of act like it." It's near 10 p.m. on a recent evening at Small's, one of L.A.'
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2013 | By Jessica Gelt, Los Angeles Times
In Hollywood, nightclub years are like dog years. Teddy's, the tiny nightclub tucked into the far front corner of the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel, had been open and popular for an impressive seven years - retirement age for most clubs - before being shut down last year for a remodel. It's now in a soft-open phase, and if early attendance numbers and enthusiasm are any indication, it's as popular as ever. Surprisingly, Med Abrous, director of promotions and entertainment for Thompson Hotels, went out of his way to not change much during the eight months the club was shut down.
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