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ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2013 | By August Brown
If the torrent of anticipation surrounding Earl Sweatshirt's album "Doris" isn't  sufficient for you, now the much-touted Odd Future rapper has something else for you to look forward to -- a free L.A. show. The MC has announced a free set at the El Rey Theatre on Aug. 28. But you're going to have to work to get in. Tickets are only available to fans who buy copies of "Doris" from the official Odd Future Wolf Gang store (at  410 N. Fairfax Ave. in Mid-City) starting Aug. 20. One album purchase gets one free ticket, and tickets are expected to sell out quickly.  TIMELINE: Summer's must see concerts The gig is Earl's only scheduled show in L.A. at the moment.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2014 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
When she was 4, Doris Pilkington Garimara was uprooted from her home in western Australia and sent to a camp for "half-caste" aboriginals, where she grew up believing she had been abandoned and forgotten by her mother. Decades passed before she learned the full story - one that would not only answer painful questions about her past but help Australians understand one of the ugliest chapters in theirs. Pilkington Garimara and her mother belonged to "the stolen generations" - the estimated 100,000 children of mixed aboriginal and white ancestry who by government edict were snatched from their homes and reared in desolate settlements.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2013 | By Randall Roberts
Musical obsessions are some of life's great pleasures, and "Doris," the latest album by Los Angeles rapper and Odd Future member Earl Sweatshirt, 19, has lived in my car at huge volume for a month now. I'll confess to crawling up next to cars blasting "Molasses," a dubby, reggae-rolling jam co-produced by RZA and Christian Rich, sonic humble-bragging my way through L.A. I know the nooks and crannies of this baby - Earl rapping "new patterns, paddy-caking with...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 2013 | By Joseph Serna and Kate Mather
A Riverside County Superior Court judge is expected to rule this week on whether the money an 83-year-old career jewel thief wants to use to post her jail bond is from a legitimate source. The hearing over Doris Payne's $65,000 bail is scheduled for Friday. A trial readiness conference was scheduled for early February. Payne, whose exploits have garnered international headlines, is charged with second-degree burglary and grand theft - she is accused of stealing a diamond-encrusted ring from a Palm Desert jewelry store in October - and has pleaded not guilty.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic, This post has been corrected. See note below for details
On a recent afternoon Thebe Kgositsile, 19, wandered around his sparse central Hollywood apartment lugging a gallon of orange juice and thinking about the logo to his fledgling music imprint Tan Cressida. A piano melody looped from a computer plugged into the keyboard next to it. The early stages of a beat, its evolution would soundtrack the rest of the afternoon as he built it while meeting with his attorney and his manager and worrying aloud that he was getting sick. He'd been coughing all morning, and Bonnaroo was less than a week away.
SPORTS
June 22, 1989 | STEVE LOWERY, Times Staff Writer
Take it easy, Charlie Smith. Take a vacation, take a tonic, take a hike, take a gander at your accomplishments and your bank statement and take off, will you please. You won eight national riding titles in your career and all that time you were saving nickels and dimes, not to mention C-notes, T-bills and stock options. You are that rare and fortunate individual who is secure in his past and future. So why are you at present sitting in the Los Alamitos Race Course maintenance department break room, digging your teeth into a white onion, preparing to put up a few more acoustic ceiling tiles in the banquet room?
SPORTS
January 17, 2013 | By Steve Dilbeck
There are tattoos - like everywhere but on Betty White , I think - and then there are tattoos . Matt Kemp already had his share, but now he has one that you're not going to find at your local ink shop. Kemp has had a tattoo added of grandparents Doris and Vernon Mukes that takes up his entire left pectoral. The tribute is not only huge, but artistically, pretty impressive. It's not known how Doris feels about the new tat. She complained to Sports Illustrated in 2011 that she was less than thrilled with Kemp's skin artwork.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 1987 | MARK CHALON SMITH and 'SAME TIME, NEXT YEAR' A Resident Theatre Company production of the Bernard Slade play at the Muckenthaler Cultural Center. Director Sydell Weiner. With Veda Franklin and Gary Weissbrot. Sets Gil Morales. Costumes Lynda Krinke. Lighting Steve Pliska. Sound design James Innocente. Plays Thursday through Sunday through July 26 at 8:15 p.m., with dinner served at 7 p.m. Tickets: $15-$18.50. The center is at 1201 W. Malvern Ave., Fullerton. (714) 871-8101.
If you're going to do "Same Time, Next Year" successfully, you'd better make sure the actors playing Doris and George are more than accomplished. They've got to be likable as well. As the only characters in this Bernard Slade comedy, they must sustain our interest for more than two hours as they age through 25 years of love, lust and life's labors. If the performances are flat, the play can be an exercise in tedium.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 1995 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Vickery, one of America's best classical actors, recently appeared as "The Misanthrope" at South Coast Repertory. Jane Carr has a long list of classical credits from her eight years in the Royal Shakespeare Company and elsewhere. Now they're doing Bernard Slade's "Same Time, Next Year" in La Mirada. Let's not get snooty. Slade is no Moliere, but he knew how to put together a commercial Broadway comedy--for 1975 audiences. Yes, La Mirada is a long way from London.
NEWS
June 19, 1986 | HERB HAIN
Ruth Donaldson of Glendale is trying to find leg makeup , which she claims is so practical in the summer and is cooler than hosiery. But cosmetic counters don't seem to stock the product. Can you help before Donaldson gets cold feet over this situation, or won't she have a leg to stand on this summer? J.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2013 | By Kate Mather
INDIO -- Doris Payne , the 83-year-old career jewelry thief whose worldwide exploits have grabbed international headlines, was ordered to stand trial Wednesday in her most recent case out of Riverside County. Payne has been charged with second-degree burglary and grand theft after allegedly stealing a diamond-encrusted ring from a Palm Desert jewelry store Oct. 21. She has pleaded not guilty to the charges. Riverside County Superior Court Judge Richard A. Erwood ordered Payne back in court Dec. 26, and denied her attorneys' request to release her from custody.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2013 | By Kate Mather
INDIO - Doris Payne, the 83-year-old career jewelry thief whose worldwide exploits have grabbed international headlines, was ordered to stand trial Wednesday in her most recent case in Riverside County. Payne has been charged with second-degree burglary and grand theft after allegedly stealing a diamond-encrusted ring from a Palm Desert jewelry store Oct. 21. She has pleaded not guilty. Riverside County Superior Court Judge Richard A. Erwood ordered Payne back in court Dec. 26, and denied her attorneys' request to release her from custody.
NEWS
November 20, 2013 | By Sara Lessley, guest blogger
Nobel Prize-winning author Doris Lessing, who died this week at 94, is best known, and appropriately so, as a ground-breaking feminist writer. As the L.A. Times' Kim Murphy wrote in Lessing's obituary , her “richly imagined, scathingly perceptive novels helped define early feminism and the doomed idealism of the postwar generation.” Lessing's signature work, “The Golden Notebook,” Murphy wrote, suggested that humanity, male and female,...
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
There's a tidbit deep in the Times archive that reminds us of just what a brilliant artist and provocateur Doris Lessing could be. Lessing died Sunday at the age of 94. Back in 1984, she was already one of England's most celebrated novelists: She'd written two dozen books and was being mentioned in news reports as a potential recipient of the Nobel Prize for Literature, though she'd have to wait 23 years more to win it. She wanted to prove to...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 2013 | By Nita Lelyveld
So much in Los Angeles changes fast. Treasure the good things that don't. "Hello, Doris!" goes the chorus of regulars at the Original Farmers Market, when they stop by to see Doris Perez, who has been there as long as they know. Her first job was at the Desert Date Shop, with its saltwater taffy, plump medjools and deglet noors - though, truth be told, not many who visit remember her from way back then. They do from Du-par's, where she worked pies for 38 years, selling thousands each Thanksgiving Day from the parking lot when the rest of the market was closed.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2013 | By Scott Martelle
History, as we all know, is framed by events. But it also grows from relationships, both personal and political, and is framed by how the actions of particular players in specific circumstances set the course for the future. In her sweeping new history, "The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism," Doris Kearns Goodwin focuses on the relationships among Roosevelt, Taft and those pesky muckraking journalists and how their individual behaviors influenced not only one another but also the nation.
TRAVEL
May 2, 2004 | Stephanie Booth, Special to The Times
A cabdriver taking us to the ferry at Malta's Cirkewwa Harbor shook his head when we told him we were planning to spend the remaining days of last April's weeklong vacation on Gozo, Malta's tiny sister island and only a third the size of its sibling. "Gozo is slow." He shook his head disapprovingly. "There's nothing there!"
SPORTS
November 12, 1992 | Associated Press
Gene Jelks, a former Alabama football player, says he was paid thousands of dollars by coaches and school boosters during his career with the Crimson Tide. In a copyright story in today's Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Jelks, a cornerback and captain on Alabama's 1989 Southeastern Conference championship team, charged that: "I was bought and sold to the university." He said money was funneled to him and his mother while he was still in high school to obligate him to play for the Crimson Tide.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 2013 | By Kate Mather
Doris Payne, the 83-year-old woman with a decades-long history of jewel thievery, pleaded not guilty Tuesday to charges stemming from her latest case in Riverside County. Payne, whose capers stretched across the globe and inspired a documentary, pleaded not guilty to one count each of second-degree burglary and grand theft, Riverside County district attorney's spokesman John Hall said. A settlement conference was scheduled for Nov. 20 in Indio, he added. Payne was arrested last week after she allegedly stole a $22,500 diamond-encrusted ring from a jewelry store on El Paseo, Palm Desert's luxurious row of shops.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 2013 | By Kate Mather and Richard Winton
Doris Payne, 83, an international jewel thief who has been in and out of prison for decades, is scheduled to be arraigned Thursday afternoon in Indio. Payne, who is the focus of a recent documentary "The Life and Crimes of Doris Payne," was arrested Tuesday in Los Angeles County eight days after she allegedly walked into a Palm Desert jewelry store and stole a $22,000 diamond ring. On Oct. 18, a veteran detective at a Saks Fifth Avenue store in Palm Desert alerted authorities after recognizing Payne from a 2010 theft and arrest, authorities said.
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