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Doris Kearns Goodwin

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2013 | By Amy Kaufman
DreamWorks is heading back to 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. A year after Steven Spielberg's "Lincoln" became a box office hit and award-season favorite, the filmmaker's DreamWorks Studios has announced plans to make another presidential drama -- and based on the work of the same author who helped make "Lincoln" possible. The studio has acquired the rights to historian Doris Kearns Goodwin's upcoming book "The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism," which is set for publication Nov. 5. Kearns also wrote 2005's "Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln," which became the basis for Tony Kushner's "Lincoln" script.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2013 | By Scott Martelle
History, as we all know, is framed by events. But it also grows from relationships, both personal and political, and is framed by how the actions of particular players in specific circumstances set the course for the future. In her sweeping new history, "The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism," Doris Kearns Goodwin focuses on the relationships among Roosevelt, Taft and those pesky muckraking journalists and how their individual behaviors influenced not only one another but also the nation.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2013 | By Scott Martelle
History, as we all know, is framed by events. But it also grows from relationships, both personal and political, and is framed by how the actions of particular players in specific circumstances set the course for the future. In her sweeping new history, "The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism," Doris Kearns Goodwin focuses on the relationships among Roosevelt, Taft and those pesky muckraking journalists and how their individual behaviors influenced not only one another but also the nation.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2013 | By Amy Kaufman
DreamWorks is heading back to 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. A year after Steven Spielberg's "Lincoln" became a box office hit and award-season favorite, the filmmaker's DreamWorks Studios has announced plans to make another presidential drama -- and based on the work of the same author who helped make "Lincoln" possible. The studio has acquired the rights to historian Doris Kearns Goodwin's upcoming book "The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism," which is set for publication Nov. 5. Kearns also wrote 2005's "Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln," which became the basis for Tony Kushner's "Lincoln" script.
OPINION
August 7, 2002
Re "As History Repeats Itself, the Scholar Becomes the Story," Aug. 4: Scholarship is not whatever one can get away with. When I taught English composition at the University of Dayton for 38 years, I did not allow the students to paraphrase. I told them that if the idea was worth using they should use the exact words of the original writer to get the original feeling and exact meaning. And they must cite it. They had no problem understanding that. Doris Kearns Goodwin would fail freshman comp.
OPINION
October 23, 1994 | By Steve Proffitt, Proffitt is a producer for Fox News and a contributor to National Public Radio's "All Things Considered" and "Morning Edition." He spoke with Goodwin from her home in Boston
Doris Kearns Goodwin tells a story about how, if she were a journalist, she would have been kicked out of the business. In August, 1976, she traveled to Plains, Ga., to interview presidential candidate Jimmy Carter. Goodwin, a political-science teacher at Harvard, had just published her first major biography, "Lyndon Johnson and the American Dream." The Ladies' Home Journal had hired her to write an article. She asked Carter about morality and fidelity.
NEWS
March 4, 1987 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, Times Staff Writer
For 20 years, from 1941 while she was on a vacation until 1961 after her husband suffered a stroke, Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy did not know the truth about her retarded daughter, Rosemary. She did not know, Doris Kearns Goodwin writes in "The Fitzgeralds and the Kennedys," that her husband, Joseph P. Kennedy, had submitted their eldest daughter, the third of their nine children, to a lobotomy, hoping to improve her agitated condition. Only when she visited St.
NEWS
September 19, 1994 | JOSH GETLIN, LOS ANGLELES TIMES
The First Lady's not for burning. Or is she? Several weeks ago, a group of tobacco farmers torched a straw dummy of Hillary Rodham Clinton at a rowdy demonstration in Kentucky. Angered by her campaign to crack down on smoking, they cheered as she went up in flames. It was a satisfying moment for those who detest America's First Lady. For others, it was a vulgar display. Either way, it was hardly without precedent.
BOOKS
October 9, 1994 | Blanche Wiesen Cook, Blanche Wiesen Cook's "Eleanor Roosevelt" (Viking) won the 1992 Los Angeles Times Book Prize for biography
"No Ordinary Time" is no ordinary book. Filled with new and exciting material, it is the first joint portrait of Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt during the war years. Since it is still possible, even routine, to read about F.D.R.'s presidency as if Eleanor had nothing to do with the best of Franklin's decisions, it is welcome and refreshing to find their political partnership at the center of discussion. I have long suspected that F.D.R.'s most earnest biographers avoided the war years because those years revealed a leader they preferred not to study: one who refused to confront many issues that have come to define the 20th Century, from race relations and Hitler's atrocities to the dominance of what President Eisenhower called the military-industrial complex.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2008 | Sheigh Crabtree
Steven Spielberg's long-rumored Abraham Lincoln biopic may well go into production in 2009. It would be the director's next project after "Tintin," which is expected to go into production in September. "I want to start 'Lincoln' in early 2009, because it's Lincoln's 200th anniversary," Spielberg told the German magazine Focus. Marvin Levy, Spielberg's spokesman, confirmed the director's production plans Sunday. Liam Neeson, who was in talks to play the 16th U.S. president based on an adaptation of "Team of Rivals," a biography by historian Doris Kearns Goodwin, is still associated with the project, Levy confirmed.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2012 | Ed Stockly
Click here to download TV listings for the week Nov. 4 - 10 in PDF format This week's TV Movies     CBS This Morning Doris Kearns Goodwin. (N) 7 a.m. KCBS Today Dr. Phil McGraw; the Rockettes; Carson Daly; Giancarlo Esposito; Ashley Greene; Danica McKellar. (N) 7 a.m. KNBC Good Morning America (N) 7 a.m. KABC Live With Kelly and Michael Chris Tucker; Ashley Greene; Bridgit Mendler performs. (N) 9 a.m. KABC The View Dr. Phil McGraw.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2008 | Sheigh Crabtree
Steven Spielberg's long-rumored Abraham Lincoln biopic may well go into production in 2009. It would be the director's next project after "Tintin," which is expected to go into production in September. "I want to start 'Lincoln' in early 2009, because it's Lincoln's 200th anniversary," Spielberg told the German magazine Focus. Marvin Levy, Spielberg's spokesman, confirmed the director's production plans Sunday. Liam Neeson, who was in talks to play the 16th U.S. president based on an adaptation of "Team of Rivals," a biography by historian Doris Kearns Goodwin, is still associated with the project, Levy confirmed.
OPINION
April 2, 2008
Re "Why LBJ bowed out," Opinion, March 30 This article stirred my memories of that troubled era. I have to admit that at the time, I nearly loathed President Lyndon Johnson, watching him mire himself in the Vietnam mess that overshadowed his brilliant domestic agenda. I was delighted that he declined to run for another term. I was, like most Americans, oblivious to the opportunity it would give Richard Nixon. Since then, I have come to admire Johnson and what he accomplished for the poor of America.
BOOKS
April 8, 2007
Rankings are based on a Times poll of Southland bookstores. *--* SO. CAL. RATING Fiction 1 The Memory Keeper's Daughter by Kim Edwards (Penguin: $14) A father hides the birth of a twin from his wife. 2 The Inheritance of Loss by Kiran Desai (Grove: $14) A retired judge is caught up in Nepal's independence movement. 3 Blue Shoes and Happiness by Alexander McCall Smith (Anchor: $12.95) Precious Ramotswe tries to slim down. 4 The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald (Scribner: $12.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2005 | John Rhodehamel, Special to The Times
HISTORIANS have given Abraham Lincoln rather high marks, almost always naming him our greatest president. In "Team of Rivals," an ambitious group portrait of Lincoln and his Cabinet, Doris Kearns Goodwin sees Lincoln's ability to unite what he called "discordant elements" as the source of his stature. This is the most richly detailed account of the Civil War presidency to appear in many years, and it has taken Goodwin a full decade to complete.
OPINION
August 7, 2002
Re "As History Repeats Itself, the Scholar Becomes the Story," Aug. 4: Scholarship is not whatever one can get away with. When I taught English composition at the University of Dayton for 38 years, I did not allow the students to paraphrase. I told them that if the idea was worth using they should use the exact words of the original writer to get the original feeling and exact meaning. And they must cite it. They had no problem understanding that. Doris Kearns Goodwin would fail freshman comp.
OPINION
April 2, 2008
Re "Why LBJ bowed out," Opinion, March 30 This article stirred my memories of that troubled era. I have to admit that at the time, I nearly loathed President Lyndon Johnson, watching him mire himself in the Vietnam mess that overshadowed his brilliant domestic agenda. I was delighted that he declined to run for another term. I was, like most Americans, oblivious to the opportunity it would give Richard Nixon. Since then, I have come to admire Johnson and what he accomplished for the poor of America.
NEWS
March 5, 2002 | From Associated Press
Historian Doris Kearns Goodwin, who recently admitted copying passages from other works in one of her best-selling books, has withdrawn from judging the Pulitzer Prizes next month. Pulitzer board administrator Seymour Topping said Monday that Goodwin "decided not to participate" when the board meets April 4 and 5 to choose the 21 prizes for books, drama, music and journalism work done last year. In a March 3 letter to board Chairman John S.
NATIONAL
August 4, 2002 | PETER H. KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In early January, an anonymous letter arrived at the Washington, D.C., office of the Weekly Standard. It was addressed to Executive Editor Fred Barnes, who had written a piece suggesting that historian Stephen E. Ambrose's book about World War II bombers contained some passages "barely distinguishable" from another author's work.
NATIONAL
June 1, 2002 | From Associated Press
Historian Doris Kearns Goodwin, who has faced accusations of plagiarism over a 1987 book, has resigned from the Pulitzer Prize board, Columbia University announced Friday. In a letter to board Chairman John Carroll, Goodwin said: "After the controversy earlier this year surrounding my book, 'The Fitzgeralds and the Kennedys,' and the need now to concentrate on my Lincoln manuscript, I will not be able to give the board the kind of attention it deserves."
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