Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsDorothy Chandler
IN THE NEWS

Dorothy Chandler

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2012 | By Martha Groves, Los Angeles Times
As Los Angeles came of age in the 20th century, a stately Windsor Square mansion served as a command post for the city's most powerful couple. The longtime home of publisher Norman Chandler, "Los Tiempos" (The Times) was where his wife, Dorothy Buffum Chandler, raised funds to build a nationally recognized music center and where she urged son Otis Chandler to transform the Los Angeles Times into an award-winning newspaper. Today, the city-designated historic-cultural monument is the focus of an unseemly dispute involving two house hunters who claim they were swindled into buying the compound for more than $8 million, only to find that it was "rotten to the core," according to arbitration documents.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2014 | By Joseph Carman
NEW YORK - In "Banquet of Vultures," veteran Paul Taylor Dance Company member Michael Trusnovec, dressed in a crisp black suit with a red power tie, yanks his bent knee toward his ear, conjuring up a bird of prey as he steps shrewdly through a mass of bodies. As he unfolds his talon-like hands, he evokes both a predator and a profiteer. Hands on hips, elbows splayed wide, he thrusts his leg back and swivels around a woman holding a candle, then tosses her overhead and onto the floor.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1997
When my wife and I take our out-of-town friends into Los Angeles via the Metrolink for whirlwind walking tours of the Civic Center, they always seem to want to "linger a little longer" when we reach the plaza at the Music Center. And when we leave, after having basked in the sunlight and been cooled by the fountain's spray, we have never given any thought to whom we might thank for that exhilarating feeling that we take with us . . . until now. Thank you, Dorothy Buffum Chandler (obituary, July 7)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Audra McDonald was in grand merry-making form for much of her magnificent L.A. Opera concert at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. Performing a diverse selection of songs spanning almost a century of the American musical and interspersing these works with charmingly playful patter, she gave ample room Saturday night to novelty numbers that allowed this dramatic singer a rare opportunity to flex her musical comedy muscles. Yes, the woman who won her fifth Tony Award last year for her defiantly realistic portrayal of a drug-addicted prostitute in "The Gershwins' Porgy and Bess" happens to be an ace clown.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1997
Before the L.A. Philharmonic concert Tuesday, tribute was paid to Dorothy Buffum Chandler, who died Sunday. "The best way Dorothy Chandler can be addressed is by this great orchestra, said Ernest Fleischmann, above, managing director of the orchestra. "That the Bowl exists today is because of her passion." He then asked the Hollywood Bowl audience to stand for a silent tribute to Mrs. Chandler. The Philharmonic's program also paid tribute to Mrs.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 1991 | SHAUNA SNOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Choreographer Bill T. Jones and soprano Kallen Esperian will perform Sunday night in an "intimate salon-style ceremony" at the Regent Beverly Wilshire as part of the Music Center's Dorothy B. Chandler Performing Arts Awards.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin, Los Angeles Times
It's a typically dry afternoon in Sun Valley, in an industrial area near the Burbank airport where the pavement is scorched and the air is speckled with construction dust. Tucked behind a 12-foot-high ficus hedge, however, inside a Willy Wonka-like facility teeming with invention, Jim Doyle is making it rain. A sheet of water cascades from the ceiling with a thunderous roar inside a dark, garage-like space called Area 9. Water rushes out of wide-mouthed hoses on the cement floor, flooded with half an inch.
NEWS
July 7, 1997 | From a Times Staff Writer
Dorothy Buffum Chandler, whose strength and determination were credited with revitalizing the cultural heritage of Los Angeles, died Sunday. She was 96. Mrs. Chandler also was the wife for 50 years of the late Norman Chandler, third publisher of the Los Angeles Times. She was the mother of Otis Chandler, the former publisher and chairman of the board of directors of Times Mirror Co., and Mrs. Camilla Chandler Frost, who is active on several cultural, educational and corporate boards. Mrs.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2003
I, for one, have been criticizing Disney Hall since they dug the hole in the ground ("What's Not to Like? Well ... ," by Scott Timberg, Sept. 5). Why? Because we didn't need it. The Dorothy Chandler is a young woman at 40. It is still grand and beautiful, and much more than serviceable. If musicologists and audiophiles really felt that, acoustically, the Chandler needed updating, that's what they should have spent their money on, not on building a single-use building like Disney Hall and leaving the Dorothy Chandler to rot. Stephany Yablow North Hollywood
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2012 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Bombay born and Vienna trained, debonair enough to impress Hollywood and with a swashbuckling podium style, Zubin Mehta conducted his first concert as music director of the Los Angeles Philharmonic 50 years ago. On Nov. 15, 1962, he was 26, the youngest music director in the orchestra's history, but to observers inside the Philharmonic Auditorium, Mehta came off as unshakably self-confident and strikingly capable. In six more years he would make the cover of Time magazine, an extraordinary feat for a conductor of any age. Thursday night, Mehta and the L.A. Phil will celebrate that anniversary by re-creating the program of Mozart, Hindemith and Dvorák that marked the beginning of his 16 seasons with the orchestra.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin, Los Angeles Times
It's a typically dry afternoon in Sun Valley, in an industrial area near the Burbank airport where the pavement is scorched and the air is speckled with construction dust. Tucked behind a 12-foot-high ficus hedge, however, inside a Willy Wonka-like facility teeming with invention, Jim Doyle is making it rain. A sheet of water cascades from the ceiling with a thunderous roar inside a dark, garage-like space called Area 9. Water rushes out of wide-mouthed hoses on the cement floor, flooded with half an inch.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 2013 | By Jean Lenihan
Installing the subversive, off-Broadway theatrical circus “Traces” on the deep proscenium stage of the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion tossed some extra challenges at this high-flying production. The 90-minute acrobatic work by Montreal-based 7 Fingers was featured as part of the Glorya Kaufman Presents Dance series. Seen in 2011 at Hollywood's smaller Ricardo Montalban Theater, “Traces” couldn't help but sacrifice some of its accidental, downtown flavor in the Music Center's 3,000-plus-seat hall.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2012 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Bombay born and Vienna trained, debonair enough to impress Hollywood and with a swashbuckling podium style, Zubin Mehta conducted his first concert as music director of the Los Angeles Philharmonic 50 years ago. On Nov. 15, 1962, he was 26, the youngest music director in the orchestra's history, but to observers inside the Philharmonic Auditorium, Mehta came off as unshakably self-confident and strikingly capable. In six more years he would make the cover of Time magazine, an extraordinary feat for a conductor of any age. Thursday night, Mehta and the L.A. Phil will celebrate that anniversary by re-creating the program of Mozart, Hindemith and Dvorák that marked the beginning of his 16 seasons with the orchestra.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2012 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Between 2004 and 2008, Los Angeles Opera was home to the most beautiful "Madame Butterfly" in America. But it was no doubt time to retire Robert Wilson's glowing, ascetic, stylized production, already 11 years old when it first arrived here from Paris and requiring enormous care to present properly. During that same period, San Francisco Opera mounted a more commonplace - and when it came to lighting and movement, sloppier - staging of Puccini's ever-present opera. This "Butterfly" has flown south.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2012 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
The start of fire season and opera season in Los Angeles often coincide. It's weird - a scheduling remnant from the days when the Los Angeles Opera and Los Angeles Philharmonic shared the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion and bickered over dates - but it works. The late-summer air is hot and dry, toxic with smoke. People are on edge. Sensitivities are heightened. Emotions flare. Jerks cut you off on the freeway. That's neither an improper apocalyptic atmosphere nor apoplectic state in which to receive opera.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2012
STAGE Settle in as the Bolshoi Ballet performs one of classical ballet's most famed works: "Swan Lake. " The production was originally choreographed for the Bolshoi by Marius Petipa in 1877. More than a century later the modern version will still take your breath away. Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, 135 N. Grand Ave., L.A. 7:30 p.m. Fri. 2 and 7:30 p.m. Sat. 2 p.m. Sun. $34 to $125. (213) 972-0711; http://www.musiccenter.org .
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 1986
Regarding Edy Williams' annual unveiling at the Oscar ceremony, you have to give the woman credit. Granted, she doesn't wear very much in the way of a gown, but, hey, every year this woman somehow manages to squeeze through the bars and gates of Camarillo (a feat in itself) to get to the Dorothy Chandler. After such an ordeal, who has the time or energy for looking chic. It takes all she has left to seek out an escort and then haul it on down to the Pavilion. S. E. ZYGMONT Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2006
READING about Dorothy Chandler's widely perceived indifference to the importance of having a major opera company in Los Angeles ["Holding Onto a High Note," Oct. 8] made me recall my one moment with Mrs. Chandler, circa 1979. I asked her if it was true that she was in fact indifferent to bringing opera to Los Angeles. Her answer was: "Oh, that couldn't be further from the truth. In fact, I was just in London and went to Covenant [sic] Garden." That clarified everything.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2012 | By Martha Groves, Los Angeles Times
As Los Angeles came of age in the 20th century, a stately Windsor Square mansion served as a command post for the city's most powerful couple. The longtime home of publisher Norman Chandler, "Los Tiempos" (The Times) was where his wife, Dorothy Buffum Chandler, raised funds to build a nationally recognized music center and where she urged son Otis Chandler to transform the Los Angeles Times into an award-winning newspaper. Today, the city-designated historic-cultural monument is the focus of an unseemly dispute involving two house hunters who claim they were swindled into buying the compound for more than $8 million, only to find that it was "rotten to the core," according to arbitration documents.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2011 | By Susan Reiter, Special to the Los Angeles Times
On a brisk January afternoon, there's an air of high spirits as dozens of American Ballet Theatre's dancers and staff gather in the largest studio of the company's Lower Manhattan headquarters. For two hours, as they run through ABT's newest full-length ballet, "The Bright Stream," bravura mixes with hilarity, as virtuoso turns alternate with comic vignettes. Numerous characters not usually found on the ABT stage — a tractor driver, a milkmaid and the denizens of a 1930s Soviet agricultural collective — express themselves with individuality and distinctive styles.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|