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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 1995 | CHRISTINA LIMA
Internationally acclaimed jazz pianist Dorothy Donegan will perform Sunday at the Civic Arts Plaza's Forum Theatre as part of an annual jazz series benefiting the American Assn. of University Women. This will be the second time she has performed in Ventura County. In 1993, Donegan played at Wheeler Hot Springs and the Thousand Oaks Library. Tickets for the 7 p.m. concert are $25 and available at the box office, Ticketmaster and from the university women's group, which is sponsoring the concert.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 1998 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Dorothy Donegan hit the jazz world at a time when it was not quite sure what to make of female instrumentalists. There were a few, of course, Lil Hardin, Mary Lou Williams and Melba Liston among them. But women in jazz were generally expected to make their way with their voices, as singers. Donegan, who died Tuesday in Los Angeles at the age of 76, had other ideas.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 1988 | A. JAMES LISKA
Despite all of her mischievous, little-girl affectations, there is something quite regal about Dorothy Donegan, the pianist-singer who opened a four-night engagement at the Catalina Bar & Grill Thursday night. During her nearly two-hour opening set, Donegan displayed great authority as she played a series of tunes from the standard repertoire.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1998 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dorothy Donegan, an eclectic and colorful jazz pianist and singer who also excelled at ragtime, boogie-woogie, gospel, blues and classical music, has died. She was 76. Donegan, one of the nation's most respected but little known jazz artists, died Tuesday in her Los Angeles home of colon cancer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1998 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dorothy Donegan, an eclectic and colorful jazz pianist and singer who also excelled at ragtime, boogie-woogie, gospel, blues and classical music, has died. She was 76. Donegan, one of the nation's most respected but little known jazz artists, died Tuesday in her Los Angeles home of colon cancer.
NEWS
November 25, 1993 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The continuing saga of Dorothy Donegan is a heartening story, the one about the veteran--in this case, a conspicuously gifted woman in a male-dominated world--who, at last, came in from the cold. Her most widely public exposure came in June, when the vivacious 71-year-old wowed 'em at the "Jazz at the White House" festival, telecast on PBS. Donegan, ever amicable and wry, appreciates the newfound, long-earned spotlight.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 1987 | LEONARD FEATHER
Credit Rose Murphy with a sunny, ingratiating smile, coupled with the ability to love her audience and be loved in return. Beyond that, there is little about the veteran entertainer that calls for comment, let alone analysis. Everything remains much as it was decades ago. She still has the almost total inability to complete a chorus of lyrics without a self-interruption such as "che-che-che," a chirp, a giggle, or some other sound effect.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1992 | LEONARD FEATHER
After decades of neglect by the media (she is not even listed in Grove's Dictionary of Jazz), pianist Dorothy Donegan is finally being discovered. But at age 68. What took her so long? Perhaps Donegan, who's appearing nightly through Sunday at Catalina, had to shed the visual antics on which critics and audiences tended to concentrate.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 1998 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Dorothy Donegan hit the jazz world at a time when it was not quite sure what to make of female instrumentalists. There were a few, of course, Lil Hardin, Mary Lou Williams and Melba Liston among them. But women in jazz were generally expected to make their way with their voices, as singers. Donegan, who died Tuesday in Los Angeles at the age of 76, had other ideas.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 1992 | DIRK SUTRO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jazz players battle for recognition, even more so when they are women. After more than 50 years in the music business, critically acclaimed pianist Dorothy Donegan is receiving some of the attention that might have been accorded her years ago had she been male. In January, Donegan, 69, was elected to the prestigious Jazz Masters Hall of Fame, an honor that carried with it a $20,000 grant Donegan can use as she pleases.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 1995 | CHRISTINA LIMA
Internationally acclaimed jazz pianist Dorothy Donegan will perform Sunday at the Civic Arts Plaza's Forum Theatre as part of an annual jazz series benefiting the American Assn. of University Women. This will be the second time she has performed in Ventura County. In 1993, Donegan played at Wheeler Hot Springs and the Thousand Oaks Library. Tickets for the 7 p.m. concert are $25 and available at the box office, Ticketmaster and from the university women's group, which is sponsoring the concert.
NEWS
November 25, 1993 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The continuing saga of Dorothy Donegan is a heartening story, the one about the veteran--in this case, a conspicuously gifted woman in a male-dominated world--who, at last, came in from the cold. Her most widely public exposure came in June, when the vivacious 71-year-old wowed 'em at the "Jazz at the White House" festival, telecast on PBS. Donegan, ever amicable and wry, appreciates the newfound, long-earned spotlight.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 1992 | LEONARD FEATHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
To call Dorothy Donegan the hottest new sensation in jazz is to ignore a central fact: It took 50 years for her to achieve full-scale fame and fortune, even though other pianists have long been awed by her. Lately the pace has quickened for the 70-year-old Donegan, who will appear today in concert at Pepperdine University in Malibu, sharing the bill with trumpeter-vocalist-comedian Jack Sheldon.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1992 | LEONARD FEATHER
After decades of neglect by the media (she is not even listed in Grove's Dictionary of Jazz), pianist Dorothy Donegan is finally being discovered. But at age 68. What took her so long? Perhaps Donegan, who's appearing nightly through Sunday at Catalina, had to shed the visual antics on which critics and audiences tended to concentrate.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 1992 | DIRK SUTRO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jazz players battle for recognition, even more so when they are women. After more than 50 years in the music business, critically acclaimed pianist Dorothy Donegan is receiving some of the attention that might have been accorded her years ago had she been male. In January, Donegan, 69, was elected to the prestigious Jazz Masters Hall of Fame, an honor that carried with it a $20,000 grant Donegan can use as she pleases.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 1991 | LEONARD FEATHER, Leonard Feather is The Times' jazz critic.
Jazz has had its share of reputed halls of fame over the years, but they've been mostly promotional gimmicks that quickly faded. The only one that carries any weight is the American Jazz Masters series, an unofficial Jazz Hall of Fame sponsored by the National Endowment for the Arts. The 1992 honorees, to be announced today in Washington, D.C., are trumpeter Harry (Sweets) Edison, pianist Dorothy Donegan and singer Betty Carter. Each will receive a $20,000 award.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 1991 | LEONARD FEATHER, Leonard Feather is The Times' jazz critic.
Jazz has had its share of reputed halls of fame over the years, but they've been mostly promotional gimmicks that quickly faded. The only one that carries any weight is the American Jazz Masters series, an unofficial Jazz Hall of Fame sponsored by the National Endowment for the Arts. The 1992 honorees, to be announced today in Washington, D.C., are trumpeter Harry (Sweets) Edison, pianist Dorothy Donegan and singer Betty Carter. Each will receive a $20,000 award.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 1988 | A. JAMES LISKA
Despite all of her mischievous, little-girl affectations, there is something quite regal about Dorothy Donegan, the pianist-singer who opened a four-night engagement at the Catalina Bar & Grill Thursday night. During her nearly two-hour opening set, Donegan displayed great authority as she played a series of tunes from the standard repertoire.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 1987 | LEONARD FEATHER
Credit Rose Murphy with a sunny, ingratiating smile, coupled with the ability to love her audience and be loved in return. Beyond that, there is little about the veteran entertainer that calls for comment, let alone analysis. Everything remains much as it was decades ago. She still has the almost total inability to complete a chorus of lyrics without a self-interruption such as "che-che-che," a chirp, a giggle, or some other sound effect.
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