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HOME & GARDEN
November 25, 2004 | Barbara King, Barbara King can be reached at barbara.king@latimes.com.
It was for uplift and derring-do in this season of heightened social pressures that I turned to Dorothy Draper. She's the kind of gutsy dame you rarely encounter anymore except in old black-and-white movies. From the '20s through the '50s, Draper reigned as a New York doyenne of high drama and operatic style. The original mix-and-match interior decorator, she combined the classical with the cha-cha: oversized architectural details, lipstick red with violet, big stripes with bigger florals.
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HOME & GARDEN
November 25, 2004 | Barbara King, Barbara King can be reached at barbara.king@latimes.com.
It was for uplift and derring-do in this season of heightened social pressures that I turned to Dorothy Draper. She's the kind of gutsy dame you rarely encounter anymore except in old black-and-white movies. From the '20s through the '50s, Draper reigned as a New York doyenne of high drama and operatic style. The original mix-and-match interior decorator, she combined the classical with the cha-cha: oversized architectural details, lipstick red with violet, big stripes with bigger florals.
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HOME & GARDEN
January 8, 2004 | Barbara King
The inimitable, audaciously confident New York decorator Dorothy Draper advised us way back in the '30s that the world was full of beautiful colors to choose from, so we ought to pick the ones we like the best and just throw them together. "Your own taste, resourcefulness and independence will carry you through," she wrote in her book "Decorating Is Fun!" Above all, she insisted: "Never be afraid of color."
HOME & GARDEN
January 8, 2004 | Barbara King
The inimitable, audaciously confident New York decorator Dorothy Draper advised us way back in the '30s that the world was full of beautiful colors to choose from, so we ought to pick the ones we like the best and just throw them together. "Your own taste, resourcefulness and independence will carry you through," she wrote in her book "Decorating Is Fun!" Above all, she insisted: "Never be afraid of color."
NEWS
June 26, 1987 | Compiled by the Fashion87 staff
For her band's new video, "Seven Wonders," Fleetwood Mac's Christine McVie needed something to wear. So she called Margi Kent in her Melrose Avenue studio and ordered up an outfit. Kent styled a show-stopper top in beaded black and a pair of velvet pants. It was one of three outfits Kent made for Ms. Mac, Listen hears from Sharon Weisz of the band's office. It was part of a busy week. After McVie, Anita Baker went to see Kent, desperately seeking something to wear for a TV appearance.
HOME & GARDEN
July 19, 2007 | David A. Keeps, Times Staff Writer
"People in Los Angeles want their homes to look like old movie sets," says Jim Turner, the man behind the new store Period. "They just don't want old furniture." His solution: updating French and English antiques with lacquered finishes, metallic and patent leather, laser-printed velvet and zebra hides. As creative director for Flaunt magazine, Turner has a firm grasp on the fabulous.
HOME & GARDEN
July 26, 2007 | David A. Keeps
Los Angeles lighting designer Cindy Ciskowski will open her showroom to the public for an end-of-season sale of her sign -- ature lamps and pendants at 25% off. Her sleek updates of traditional styles are elegantly proportioned glass forms mounted on Lucite bases and then topped with silk shades. Prices range from $100 to $1,500. Ciskowski's 22-inch square Draper pillow, shown here, is printed cotton depicting bamboo stalks in a trellis pattern and is inspired by design doyenne Dorothy Draper.
HOME & GARDEN
January 10, 2009 | David A. Keeps
After establishing Haute House, a line of upholstered furniture sold through the Neiman Marcus and Horchow catalogs, Kim Salmela opened a design studio and boutique that reflected her taste for Hollywood glamour and Park Avenue polish. The Los Angeles store, a treasure chest of Dorothy Draper-style decor as well as handsomely updated period pieces, is offering its inventory at 30% off.
HOME & GARDEN
September 13, 2007 | David A. Keeps, Times Staff Writer
Australian cosmetics mogul Napoleon Perdis, who will be touching up the stars at the Emmy Awards on Sunday, scoured the city to outfit his new 5,500-square-foot flagship space on Hollywood Boulevard. The result, which he calls "Dorothy Draper and white lacquer Baroque," recalls an earlier era of L.A. glamour. "Interior decorating requires a hunter's and collector's mentality," Perdis says.
HOME & GARDEN
December 19, 2009
Tony Duquette was more than a designer of film and theatrical sets, movie-star mansions, gardens, furniture, costumes and jewelry. The legendary Hollywood decorator (1914-1999) was also a conjurer, magically transforming plaster, paint, discount-store wares and mirrors into dazzling sculptures and exotic tableaux inspired by the storybook fantasies of his youth. For years his particular brand of decorative abandon was under-appreciated, even dismissed by some as over-the-top. This decade's revival of Hollywood Regency d├ęcor -- a theatrical blend of classical and modern styles practiced by iconic designers such as William Haines and Dorothy Draper -- sparked a renewed interest in ornate and luxurious interiors, and Duquette's work reasserted its allure.
NEWS
June 26, 1987 | Compiled by the Fashion87 staff
For her band's new video, "Seven Wonders," Fleetwood Mac's Christine McVie needed something to wear. So she called Margi Kent in her Melrose Avenue studio and ordered up an outfit. Kent styled a show-stopper top in beaded black and a pair of velvet pants. It was one of three outfits Kent made for Ms. Mac, Listen hears from Sharon Weisz of the band's office. It was part of a busy week. After McVie, Anita Baker went to see Kent, desperately seeking something to wear for a TV appearance.
HOME & GARDEN
March 15, 2007 | David A. Keeps, Times Staff Writer
FIRST produced in 1973, the Togo chair by Michel Ducaroy put the French furniture design house Ligne Roset on the map. Apartment dwellers loved its size and portability, and decorators grooved on its futuristic shape and Shar-Pei-like folds of fabric. Now the firm is offering two versions scaled for toddlers and tweens. The Baby Togo and Mini Togo come in four colors and have removable microsuede covers for easy cleaning.
HOME & GARDEN
January 17, 2009 | David A. Keeps
Santa Monica designer Michael S. Smith has won the commission to redecorate the White House living quarters for the Obama family. "He sounds like a wise choice, with his interest in traditional though not pedantic museum settings," said historian William Seale, author of "The President's House: A History." "What works best in the White House is someone who is immersed in the past and can design in a modern way." Recent presidents and first ladies have hired a designer from their home states.
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