Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsDosso Dossi
IN THE NEWS

Dosso Dossi

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1999 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
What do you make of a little-known Italian Renaissance artist who paints beefcake and butterflies, Pygmies and mournful animals? An artist who portrays an anguished St. George with a bedraggled, gasping dragon; perches the goddess Fortune on a soap bubble; casts the Christ child in shadows, cuddling a rooster; and spotlights feet so often that he appears to have had a foot fetish? A lot, if you are the Getty.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 1999 | RICHARD S. GINELL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Dosso Dossi (1486?-1542), the duchy of Ferrara's court painter, had a genius for imagery and an irreverent sense of humor second to none (he signed one painting with just a D and a bone through it; bone is "osso" in Italian). Since the Getty Museum is presenting a special Dosso exhibition through July 11, nine musicians from Musica Viva set out Saturday afternoon to complement the sights with sounds that Dosso might have heard.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1999
Christopher Knight reviews "Dosso Dossi: Court Painter in Renaissance Ferrara," at the Getty Museum.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 1999 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
When Dosso Dossi (1486?-1542) began to paint court commissions for the Este family, rulers of the duchy of Ferrara, southwest of Venice, the young artist quickly found himself wedged between a rock and a hard place. The rock was Raphael, just a few years Dosso's elder, whose precocious talent as a draftsman soon rocketed him to the top of the heap in the competitive cultural milieu of Rome.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 1999 | RICHARD S. GINELL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Dosso Dossi (1486?-1542), the duchy of Ferrara's court painter, had a genius for imagery and an irreverent sense of humor second to none (he signed one painting with just a D and a bone through it; bone is "osso" in Italian). Since the Getty Museum is presenting a special Dosso exhibition through July 11, nine musicians from Musica Viva set out Saturday afternoon to complement the sights with sounds that Dosso might have heard.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 1999 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
When Dosso Dossi (1486?-1542) began to paint court commissions for the Este family, rulers of the duchy of Ferrara, southwest of Venice, the young artist quickly found himself wedged between a rock and a hard place. The rock was Raphael, just a few years Dosso's elder, whose precocious talent as a draftsman soon rocketed him to the top of the heap in the competitive cultural milieu of Rome.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
A painting bought for a reportedly "small sum of money" at a sale in New York State and delivered to Christie's New York strapped to the roof of a Jeep sold for $4.07 million Wednesday at the Park Avenue auction house. The allegorical masterpiece by 16th-Century Italian artist Dosso Dossi is "a very important example of Italian High Renaissance painting," said Ian Kennedy, Christie's leading Old Masters expert.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 1992
* "La Promenade" by Pierre-Auguste Renoir, 1870. Purchased in 1989 for $17.5 million at Sotheby's London. * "Portrait of Cosimo I de' Medici" by Pontormo, ca. 1537. Purchased in 1989 for $35.2 million at Christie's New York. * "The Rue Mosnier With Flags" by Edouard Manet, 1878. Purchased in 1989 for $26.4 million at a Christie's New York auction of works from the Paul Mellon collection. * "An Allegory of Fortune" by Dosso Dossi, ca. 1530-42.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 1999 | SHAUNA SNOW
ART Getty Acquisition: The latest major addition to the J. Paul Getty Museum's art collection is "Saint George," a rare early painting by Italian Renaissance artist Dosso Dossi. The work was purchased privately at an undisclosed price.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1992 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
Listen up, all you swap meet lovers and estate sale hounds. Here's a tale that proves you really can strike it rich. As for you doubters who say the J. Paul Getty Museum can't build a great collection at this late date because all the art worth having is already in museums, well. . . . The story concerns Italian artist Dosso Dossi's painting "An Allegory of Fortune" (circa 1530-45), which recently went on view at the museum in Malibu.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1999
Christopher Knight reviews "Dosso Dossi: Court Painter in Renaissance Ferrara," at the Getty Museum.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1999 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
What do you make of a little-known Italian Renaissance artist who paints beefcake and butterflies, Pygmies and mournful animals? An artist who portrays an anguished St. George with a bedraggled, gasping dragon; perches the goddess Fortune on a soap bubble; casts the Christ child in shadows, cuddling a rooster; and spotlights feet so often that he appears to have had a foot fetish? A lot, if you are the Getty.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2000 | WILLIAM WILSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
An exhibition of Italian illuminated manuscripts at the Getty Center finds its focus in a book as tiny as it is sumptuous. Slightly larger than a deck of playing cards, "The Gualenghi-d'Este Hours" is billed as the greatest thing of its kind in the museum. Illustrated around 1469 by Taddeo Crivelli and Guglielmo Giraldi, it celebrates an aristocratic marriage in the principality of Ferrara. Significantly, the alliance was, in effect, a reward from the court of Ferrara to one of its advisors.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 1997
Worried your history classes didn't do justice to topics featured in the holiday movies "Amistad," "Titanic" or "Anastasia"? Never fear, a wave of television specials are here--many supplied by the very studios releasing those films. This Thursday, the History Channel will run "Ships of Slaves: The Middle Passage," which DreamWorks produced as a companion to "Amistad" and which features an introduction by director Steven Spielberg.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|