Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsDottie Dartland
IN THE NEWS

Dottie Dartland

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 1999 | BRIAN LOWRY, Brian Lowry is a Times staff writer who reports on the television industry
Hopping behind the wheel of a golf cart, her surfboard strapped to the roof, Dottie Dartland winds down the narrow path leading from her Malibu home to the beach below. As she wriggles into her wetsuit, she insists surfing is less difficult than it looks. "You just have to learn to move with the water," she explains. Dartland clearly knows how to catch a wave and ride it.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 1999
Fascinating story about Dottie Dartland, the one-time MIT economics major and former Wall Street 9-to-5er who became a writer-producer of TV sitcoms, most recently co-creating "Dharma & Greg," which she will be leaving soon to start her own new show ("At Home in the Tube," by Brian Lowry, May 30). I first became aware of her work with "Caroline in the City," at its start a magical show with a strong, albeit skewed, point of view. Unfortunately, "Caroline" seemed to lose its direction around the beginning of its third season.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 1999
Fascinating story about Dottie Dartland, the one-time MIT economics major and former Wall Street 9-to-5er who became a writer-producer of TV sitcoms, most recently co-creating "Dharma & Greg," which she will be leaving soon to start her own new show ("At Home in the Tube," by Brian Lowry, May 30). I first became aware of her work with "Caroline in the City," at its start a magical show with a strong, albeit skewed, point of view. Unfortunately, "Caroline" seemed to lose its direction around the beginning of its third season.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 1999 | BRIAN LOWRY, Brian Lowry is a Times staff writer who reports on the television industry
Hopping behind the wheel of a golf cart, her surfboard strapped to the roof, Dottie Dartland winds down the narrow path leading from her Malibu home to the beach below. As she wriggles into her wetsuit, she insists surfing is less difficult than it looks. "You just have to learn to move with the water," she explains. Dartland clearly knows how to catch a wave and ride it.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1991
Three writers from "The Wonder Years" have been nominated for best comedy script of the 1989-90 season by the Writers Guild of America, while the drama series nominations featured two each for "thirtysomething," "China Beach" and "L.A. Law." Winners of the guild's 43rd annual awards for TV, movie and radio writing will be announced in ceremonies March 20. Film nominees will be named Tuesday.
REAL ESTATE
December 6, 1998 | RUTH RYON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sylvester Stallone, who is due to start shooting the movie "Detox" in January, has purchased a newly built home in the Beverly Hills area for about $10 million. "Detox," an Imagine Entertainment and Universal Pictures film, is the first movie for Stallone, 52, since "Cop Land" (1997), in which he co-starred with Robert De Niro. Stallone and his wife, model Jennifer Flavin, have been living part time in their Miami home, which they have had on the market at $27.5 million.
NEWS
September 28, 1997 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Is there such a thing as love at first sight? Well, in the new ABC sitcom, "Dharma & Greg," it only takes a moment for the two protagonists to become utterly pixilated with each other when they meet one morning on the subway. And it only takes a few hours more for the pair to tie the knot. But in the world of comedy, true love doesn't run smoothly, especially if you're as different as Dharma and Greg.
REAL ESTATE
June 20, 1999 | RUTH RYON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jane Russell, who made her film debut during the 1940s in Howard Hughes' "The Outlaw" and co-starred with Marilyn Monroe in "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes" (1953), has listed her Montecito home at $2.7 million. Russell, who will turn 78 on Monday, made about 20 films, co-starring with such leading men as Clark Gable, Robert Mitchum and Bob Hope. She still appears occasionally on TV.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 1999
Robin Swicord deserves a standing ovation for her insightful and enlightening article ("Youth Must Be Served--With Respect," May 30). I am so tired of hearing TV and film producers relinquishing responsibility, singing their well-worn song, "We're only giving the public what it wants." Bull! Children don't know what they want--it is our job, as the adults in society, to help them learn. And, no, Mr. Violent Movie Producer, you can't always rely on parents to teach and police their children.
BUSINESS
September 24, 1997 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chuck Lorre helped create what were once two of television's most popular comedies, CBS' "Cybill" and ABC's "Grace Under Fire." You'll see his name on the credits every week. What you won't see is Lorre, who lasted roughly a year on each show, quitting because of differences with "Grace" star Brett Butler and being fired by Cybill Shepherd. Before that, he was ousted from "Roseanne," a distinction he shares with a few dozen other writer-producers.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 1998 | CARLA HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
I am woman. Hear me roar--right off the air. Murphy Brown couldn't keep a secretary, sang Aretha Franklin songs badly but with abandon and told off Dan Quayle (in a vintage moment of art imitating life when life believed the art was real). Cybill, the fortysomething Hollywood actress, was constantly shoring up two ex-husbands and fighting to maintain some shred of dignity through a changing parade of goofball acting jobs.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 1995 | Craig Tomashoff, Craig Tomashoff is a Los Angeles-based correspondent for People magazine. and
FADE IN: INT.--AVERY FISHER HALL, LINCOLN CENTER--AFTERNOON, MAY 15, 1995. As our story opens, hundreds of people have crowded into this auditorium in mid-town Manhattan. They are here to celebrate the end of pilot season--that time of year that comes sandwiched somewhere between winter and spring--by watching NBC unveil its fall schedule. The network has been looking closely at 25 series pilots, as opposed to 27 for ABC, 24 for CBS and 27 for Fox.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|