Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsDouble Jeopardy
IN THE NEWS

Double Jeopardy

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 2008 | Joel Rubin
A Los Angeles judge Friday postponed deciding whether double jeopardy should prevent prosecutors from trying a Japanese businessman in the fatal shooting of his young wife in a Los Angeles street. Kazuyoshi Miura was convicted in Japan of the 1981 slaying, but the Tokyo High Court overturned the ruling. A 2004 California law barred double jeopardy claims by those prosecuted in other countries, but defense attorney Mark Geragos had argued that the statute did not apply because the slaying and Miura's acquittal in Japan predated its passage.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SCIENCE
October 30, 2013 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
Poor, mostly black neighborhoods face double jeopardy when it comes to supermarket access, according to a study recently published by the journal Preventive Medicine. That may not sound like news at all: Scholars and activists have long fretted that poor, minority neighborhoods have worse access to supermarkets, which is tied to less healthy diets. But researchers from Johns Hopkins University wanted to see how different neighborhood traits -- poverty and racial makeup -- were related to the problem.
Advertisement
NEWS
November 24, 1994 | KIRBY LEE
La Mirada High cruised to a 24-0 victory over University High of Irvine in the first round of the Southern Section Division VIII football playoffs to improve to 11-0. The Matadores' bid for an undefeated season, however, was in jeopardy off the field when the Southern Section was notified of a possible ineligible transfer player hours before Friday's kickoff. The commissioner's office allowed the game to be played because of the short notice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 2013 | By Hector Becerra, Los Angeles Times
When it comes to Southern California's increasingly perilous fire season, you can blame both the lack of rain and the little rain we did have. Scientists at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and at Chapman University said satellite data show the effects of a steady and largely forgettable rainfall during a roughly four-day period at the end of January. JPL scientist Son Nghiem said the rain came just as much of the vegetation throughout the region was awakening from a dormant stage.
NATIONAL
May 24, 2012 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON  - The Supreme Court has limited the Constitution's protection against double jeopardy in cases involving multiple charges and a deadlocked  jury. In a 6-3 decision, the court ruled Thursday prosecutors may try again to convict a defendant of murder even after jurors in his first trial vote to acquit him of murder -- but split on whether to convict him of a lesser charge of manslaughter. Chief Justice John G. Roberts, speaking for the court, said a defendant is protected against retrials only when the first jury has rendered a “final decision” on the charges against him or her. Alex Blueford, an Arkansas man, was charged with murder, manslaughter and negligent homicide in the death of his girlfriend's 1-year-old baby.
WORLD
November 11, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
Britain will scrap its legal protection against double jeopardy and make tougher sentences available to judges as part of a major overhaul of the country's criminal justice system, Prime Minister Tony Blair said in a newspaper article. Writing in the Observer, he said the changes were intended to redress an imbalance that favored criminals instead of crime victims. Protection against double jeopardy forbids authorities to charge a defendant twice with the same crime.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1990 | MACK REED
The second murder trial of Diane Mannes was delayed last week by a U.S. District Court judge until he can determine whether it would put her in double jeopardy. Mannes, 35, of Somis, was scheduled to be tried today in Ventura County Superior Court on three second-degree murder charges. She is accused of killing three young men in March, 1989, in a drunk-driving accident on the Conejo Grade. But on Friday, Judge A.
NEWS
February 21, 1993 | THERESA HUMPHREY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Three years ago, Ronald Gillis walked out of a Delaware courthouse a free man, acquitted of murdering a friend over a $1,200 debt. Now he's in jail in Maryland, charged with the same slaying. Double jeopardy? Not according to a 1985 Supreme Court ruling allowing prosecutors in two states to try a Georgia man for the same killing.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1990
Howard Rosenberg's column ("Can They Talk? Yes, Just Don't Expect Fairness," May 30) addressed a frightening trend. After the McMartin verdicts were in, the real abuse began. There was a stampede to get the parents and children in the case on the talk shows, and appear they did, on every one of them. Found not guilty in the criminal courts, the Buckeys were crucified on television. Children who "couldn't remember" on the psychologist's original tapes told lurid stories of newly remembered abuse.
NEWS
June 5, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
The judge in the McMartin Pre-School molestation case today refused to dismiss any of the charges in defendant Ray Buckey's second trial, saying there is no double jeopardy issue involved. Superior Court Judge Stanley Weisberg acknowledged that some testimony in Buckey's trial may not have matched exactly the charges against him. But he said the accounts by three young girls provided sufficient evidence to support continued trial of the allegations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 2013 | By Hector Becerra
When it comes to Southern California's increasingly perilous fire season, you can blame it on the rain. That's the paradoxical case made by satellite data from NASA and India. Scientists at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and at Chapman University said the satellites show the effects of a steady and largely forgettable rainfall that fell during a roughly four-day period at the end of January. JPL scientist Son Nghiem, the principal investigator in the project, said the rain came just as much of the vegetation throughout the region was awakening from a dormant stage.
NATIONAL
May 24, 2012 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON  - The Supreme Court has limited the Constitution's protection against double jeopardy in cases involving multiple charges and a deadlocked  jury. In a 6-3 decision, the court ruled Thursday prosecutors may try again to convict a defendant of murder even after jurors in his first trial vote to acquit him of murder -- but split on whether to convict him of a lesser charge of manslaughter. Chief Justice John G. Roberts, speaking for the court, said a defendant is protected against retrials only when the first jury has rendered a “final decision” on the charges against him or her. Alex Blueford, an Arkansas man, was charged with murder, manslaughter and negligent homicide in the death of his girlfriend's 1-year-old baby.
SPORTS
July 29, 2011 | By Richard A. Serrano
Attorneys for former All-Star pitcher Roger Clemens asked a federal judge in Washington to dismiss charges that the Major League baseball legend lied to Congress about using steroids and asked the court to prevent prosecutors from trying him again after his first trial ended in a mistrial this month. Clemens' defense team asserted in a filing Friday that taking Clemens to trial again would be double jeopardy, and that the seven-time Cy Young Award winner should not face charges of perjury, lying to Congress and obstruction of justice.
TRAVEL
June 28, 2009
NATIONAL
October 22, 2008 | Kim Murphy
An Army lieutenant who faced court-martial for refusing to fly with his unit to Iraq won a partial reprieve when a federal judge ruled he could not be retried on the most serious charge against him. The ruling by U.S. District Judge Benjamin H. Settle concluded that a new court-martial on the issue of 1st Lt. Ehren Watada's failure to board a plane to Iraq would constitute double jeopardy, after his earlier court-martial ended in a mistrial....
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 2008 | Scott Glover
A federal judge refused to dismiss obscenity charges against a Hollywood filmmaker whose prosecution was halted when a judge overseeing the case declared a mistrial after acknowledging he had posted sexually explicit material on his own publicly accessible personal website. Attorney Roger Jon Diamond sought to have the case against Ira Isaacs thrown out, arguing that the judge who recused himself, Alex Kozinski, did not have a legitimate reason for stepping down and declaring a mistrial.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1985 | H.G. REZA, Times Staff Writer
Despite objections by her attorney, Betty Lou Batey's sentencing for a contempt conviction was delayed Friday by a Superior Court judge who wondered if a jail term would put the woman in double jeopardy. Judge Judith McConnell said she feared that, if she imposed sentence on Mrs. Batey, another judge would be prevented from jailing the woman if she is convicted in a related felony case that is pending. Mrs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 2008 | Ann M. Simmons
A hearing on a defense motion to dismiss murder and conspiracy charges against a Japanese national accused in his wife's 1981 slaying in downtown Los Angeles ended Friday without a ruling. Torrance Superior Court Judge Steven Van Sicklen continued the case against Kazuyoshi Miura, now 61, who was found guilty of his wife's murder in Japan in 1994, but was later acquitted. Mark Geragos, who is representing Miura, argued that his client can't be tried for the crime in the United States without unconstitutionally placing him in double jeopardy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2008 | From the Associated Press
The lawyer for a Japanese businessman accused of killing his wife in 1981 filed legal papers Thursday insisting that his client was acquitted in Japan of murder and conspiracy and can't be tried in the United States without being placed in double jeopardy. Attorney Mark Geragos filed the papers answering a lengthy prosecution motion on the eve of a major hearing set for this afternoon for Kazuyoshi Miura. A judge is expected to decide whether Miura will be extradited from Saipan to Los Angeles for a murder trial or will be set free to return to his home in Japan.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|