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Doubt Movie

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2009 | Lisa Rosen
It's been a big week. On Thursday, at an ungodly hour, the Academy Award nominations were announced. And two days earlier, there was some excitement on the East Coast as well. President Barack Obama was inaugurated on the Capitol steps, in front of a sea of people from every demographic. Viola Davis, a newly crowned supporting actress nominee for her role as Mrs. Miller in "Doubt," was watching the scene in tears at home in Los Angeles with her husband.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2009 | Lisa Rosen
It's been a big week. On Thursday, at an ungodly hour, the Academy Award nominations were announced. And two days earlier, there was some excitement on the East Coast as well. President Barack Obama was inaugurated on the Capitol steps, in front of a sea of people from every demographic. Viola Davis, a newly crowned supporting actress nominee for her role as Mrs. Miller in "Doubt," was watching the scene in tears at home in Los Angeles with her husband.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2008 | CHARLES McNULTY
Oscar season has arrived and with it a couple of prestige projects straight from The Theatah. "Hollywood Burgles Broadway for Bric-A-Brac" reads the likely Variety headline. The only problem is that those coveted statuettes aren't exactly in the bag. "Frost/Nixon," adapted by author Peter Morgan and directed by Ron Howard, and "Doubt," adapted and directed by author John Patrick Shanley, haven't been radically altered, but changes in thematic emphasis, acting style and dramatic pacing might upset viewers silly enough to want to relive their theatrical experiences at the multiplex.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2008 | CHARLES McNULTY
Oscar season has arrived and with it a couple of prestige projects straight from The Theatah. "Hollywood Burgles Broadway for Bric-A-Brac" reads the likely Variety headline. The only problem is that those coveted statuettes aren't exactly in the bag. "Frost/Nixon," adapted by author Peter Morgan and directed by Ron Howard, and "Doubt," adapted and directed by author John Patrick Shanley, haven't been radically altered, but changes in thematic emphasis, acting style and dramatic pacing might upset viewers silly enough to want to relive their theatrical experiences at the multiplex.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1987 | DON SHIRLEY
Exhibit Z in our study of whether actors' loyalties are with the stage or the screen: Peter Falk is leaving the Ahmanson's "Light Up the Sky" three weeks early in order to appear in the movie "Vibes," which starts shooting next week. Robert Morse will replace him Tuesday and continue for the remainder of the run. "He (Falk) put a gun to the Ahmanson's head," said "Light Up the Sky" producer Christopher Hart.
BOOKS
December 5, 1999
Stephen Crane's "The Red Badge of Courage," Norman Mailer's "The Naked and the Dead," Tim O'Brien's "The Things They Carried"--American fiction writers have conjured up powerful portraits of war, largely from the foot soldier's chaotic point of view. But war as experienced by the policymakers, the civilian shapers, the power holders and the bureaucrats has not been a subject of American fiction. In fact, power generally has not much been favored by fiction writers.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 1991 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON, Lawrence Christon is a Times staff writer
Few actors are lucky enough to come up with a single role that informs the psyche of a generation or else slips into the cultural vernacular, like a Captain Queeg or a Vito Corleone. At 54, in a career that spans 23 movies, Dustin Hoffman has had at least four: in "The Graduate," "Midnight Cowboy," "Tootsie" and "Rain Man." The number goes up to five if you'll concede "Kramer vs.
OPINION
November 16, 2004
The Nov. 13 Times' editorial, "Private Ryan, Unsaved," is correct in explaining and condemning the removal by some ABC affiliates of the film "Saving Private Ryan." It does contain violence and profanity and does depict heroism and show that "war is hell." It is also true that the Federal Communications Commission failed to stand up against the shameful pressures of vigilante groups. What is missed is that "Saving Private Ryan," like "All Quiet on the Western Front," is not a war film.
SPORTS
September 20, 2007 | Chuck Culpepper, Special to The Times
The deathless film "The Natural" resurfaced yet again this summer, when naïve commentators from small towns to syndicated columnist Charles Krauthammer cited it while lauding Rick Ankiel's magical rebound from failed St. Louis Cardinals pitcher to Herculean St. Louis outfielder. As the latest incarnation of "The Natural," Ankiel qualified as a one-man antidote to a season of cynicism until the New York Daily News reported Sept.
BUSINESS
July 28, 1995 | CLAUDIA ELLER
These are highly emotional times for Sam Goldwyn Jr. Because of financial strains, the 69-year-old son of the legendary mogul is being forced to sell off his 16-year-old company, which has produced and distributed such critically acclaimed films as "The Madness of King George," "Much Ado About Nothing," "Eat, Drink, Man, Woman" and "sex, lies and videotape." Sources predict that within weeks, Samuel Goldwyn Co.--of which Goldwyn owns 64.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1987 | DON SHIRLEY
Exhibit Z in our study of whether actors' loyalties are with the stage or the screen: Peter Falk is leaving the Ahmanson's "Light Up the Sky" three weeks early in order to appear in the movie "Vibes," which starts shooting next week. Robert Morse will replace him Tuesday and continue for the remainder of the run. "He (Falk) put a gun to the Ahmanson's head," said "Light Up the Sky" producer Christopher Hart.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 1986 | SHEILA BENSON, Times Film Critic
Of all the classic categories of movies, the misfits who must somehow be shaped into a fighting unit is one of the most durable. It's succeeded in everything from "The Dirty Dozen" to "Stripes." "Heartbreak Ridge" (citywide) reworks the formula again, and the reward is a vintage Clint Eastwood performance--in a film so uninvolving that you barely wake up for the big battle finale.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 1988 | ELAINE POFELDT, Times Staff Writer
The executive director of a San Diego evangelical group said Thursday that member churches are planning to protest the opening today of Martin Scorsese's "The Last Temptation of Christ" at the AMC Fashion Valley 4 theater complex. The Rev. Jim Whitby, whose San Diego Evangelical Assn. represents about 240 San Diego churches, said peaceful protests are planned for all six showings of the Universal Pictures release today.
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