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Doug Morris

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BUSINESS
June 24, 1998 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One day after signing an agreement to buy PolyGram for $10.4 billion, Seagram Co. designated Doug Morris the future head of the combined music entity--the largest record company in the world. Morris, a former songwriter and highly regarded industry veteran, will take over as chairman and chief executive of the record giant, to be named Universal Music Group, following approval of the deal by government regulators--a process that could take five months or more.
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NEWS
February 26, 2014
Nancy Sullivan is Vice President, Communications for the Los Angeles Times. She is responsible for all internal and external communications strategy and implementaion for Los Angeles Times Media Group, as well as the development and execution of media relations campaigns in support of company goals and initiatives. She serves as The Times' spokesperson and oversees Community Affairs. She joined The Times in October 2006 as Executive Director, Communications.  Previously, Sullivan was a senior vice president for Rogers and Cowan Inc., from October 2002 to March 2006.
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BUSINESS
April 8, 1994 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of Doug Morris' first jobs in music in the 1960s was working as an assistant to the late songwriter Bert Berns, known for such hits as "Twist and Shout" and "Hang On, Sloopy." A periodic task was to cash Berns' paychecks at a bank. Morris would then head over to Atlantic Records' New York studio, where he would deliver the cash to Berns. Some 30 years later, Morris is still delivering the cash at Atlantic, albeit in considerably higher sums.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2013 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski
The Recording Academy will present its prestigious Salute to Industry Icons award to Universal Music Group Chairman and Chief Executive Lucian Grainge in recognition of his contributions to the music business. A pre-Grammy gala will be held Jan. 25 at the Beverly Hilton to honor Grainge, who has advanced the work of such major acts as ABBA, Jay Z, Elton John, Eminem, Metallica, Katy Perry, Rihanna, U2 and Amy Winehouse over the span of his more than three-decade-long career. (The 56th Grammy awards themselves will take place Jan. 26.)
BUSINESS
November 26, 1997 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Less than two years ago, music veteran Doug Morris launched a tiny New York label with a unique management philosophy. Morris, 57, who had just been fired as domestic chief of Time Warner's music division, decided to build a record company with a diverse, multicultural staff and executive team. The label was financed by Seagram, which later hired Morris to run its global music division.
BUSINESS
July 11, 1994 | CHUCK PHILIPS and JAMES BATES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Warner Music Group has promoted Doug Morris, head of its Atlantic division, to chief of North American operations, signaling the start of a dramatic shake-up at the world's biggest record conglomerate. The move, which is expected to be announced today, culminates a months-long power struggle among the company's executives and is the first step in a sweeping realignment at Time Warner's domestic music division, home to such superstar acts as Madonna, Metallica and Snoop Doggy Dogg.
BUSINESS
November 17, 1995 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a startling corporate shake-up, MCA Inc. on Thursday ousted Al Teller, the company's longtime top record executive, and replaced him with former Warner Music Group executive Doug Morris. Rocking the music industry, the announcement came shortly after Time Warner Inc. fired its global music chief, Michael J. Fuchs, who had fired Morris a few months ago. Morris ascended to his new position within minutes of Fuchs' firing. "Do I have a weird life or what?"
BUSINESS
May 30, 1998 | Chuck Philips
Doug Morris is expected to be tapped soon to oversee Seagram Co.'s new global music operations in the wake of its $10.6-billion deal to purchase music giant PolyGram, sources said. The company has yet to make a formal announcement. Morris has been chairman of Seagram's Universal Music Group since 1995 and is credited with transforming the once-dormant record division into a domestic rock powerhouse with the addition of his own Universal label and Interscope Records.
BUSINESS
December 13, 2000 | Chuck Philips
Industry veteran Doug Morris has signed a five-year contract to continue running Vivendi-owned Universal Music Group, the world's largest record conglomerate with such stars as Eminem and Shania Twain. Morris was hired in 1995 by Seagram and has seen its Universal music arm through a series of mergers with Dutch giant PolyGram and French utility behemoth Vivendi. Morris, a songwriter whose credits include the Chiffons' hit "Sweet Talkin' Guy," joined Universal after being forced out as U.S.
BUSINESS
November 27, 1995 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
MCA Music Entertainment Group Chairman Doug Morris is expected to announce a reorganization today that will include the appointment of Melvyn R. Lewinter as vice chairman of the record company and Zack Horowitz as president. The move comes just 12 days after Morris took over the reins of MCA Inc.'s music operations after the sudden ouster of former chairman Al Teller. MCA is 80% owned by Seagram Co.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2012 | By Alex Pham, Los Angeles Times
Industry veteran Doug Morris, the chief executive of Sony Music Entertainment and founder of Vevo Inc., has issued a threat to Google Inc.: Give us a better rate for our music videos or we'll take them elsewhere. Morris, who launched his music career in the mid-1960s by writing the Chiffons' song "Sweet Talkin' Guy," now is talking tough when it comes to renewing Vevo's contract to distribute its videos on Google's YouTube when the deal expires at the end of the year. That's a serious threat given that Vevo - which features videos of Katy Perry, Justin Bieber, Rihanna and about 11,000 other artists - is YouTube's most popular channel, according to ComScore Inc. In May, Vevo's videos generated 617.8 million views on the site, which Google acquired in 2006 for $1.65 billion.
BUSINESS
March 3, 2011 | By Alex Pham, Los Angeles Times
Doug Morris has been named the new chief executive of Sony Music Entertainment, an appointment that was widely expected when Morris last year said he would step down as head of Universal Music Group at the end of 2010. Morris, 72, will succeed Rolf Schmidt-Holz on July 1, and Schmidt-Holz will exit Sony at the end of the month, when his contract expires. In the interim, Sony Corp. Chairman Howard Stringer will helm the music company. In a high-level corporate talent swap, a number of Sony executives are expected to move to Universal over the next few months, including Barry Weiss, the chairman of Sony's RCA/Jive Label Group, who is expected to lead Universal's operations in New York.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2002 | Robert Hilburn, Times Staff Writer
As the head of the world's largest record company, Universal Music Group Chairman Doug Morris could spend all morning hobnobbing with the power-breakfast crowd at the Peninsula Hotel. Here comes Dave Glew now, Epic Records Group chairman and Morris' old friend. "Dave, you're looking great. Everything OK?" Morris, in town from New York for the week, could be talking about his latest successes: the mounting sales of the Eminem album or the critical back flips over the new Beck CD.
BUSINESS
December 13, 2000 | Chuck Philips
Industry veteran Doug Morris has signed a five-year contract to continue running Vivendi-owned Universal Music Group, the world's largest record conglomerate with such stars as Eminem and Shania Twain. Morris was hired in 1995 by Seagram and has seen its Universal music arm through a series of mergers with Dutch giant PolyGram and French utility behemoth Vivendi. Morris, a songwriter whose credits include the Chiffons' hit "Sweet Talkin' Guy," joined Universal after being forced out as U.S.
BUSINESS
May 12, 1999 | CHUCK PHILIPS
Doug Morris has come a long way since his first big hit: the Chiffons' 1966 smash, "Sweet Talkin' Guy." Sitting in an office on Broadway near the tiny storefront where he co-wrote that song, Morris now heads the world's largest record corporation, Seagram Co.'s Universal Music Group. Morris' emergence as arguably the most powerful figure in music follows some very bizarre twists.
BUSINESS
June 24, 1998 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One day after signing an agreement to buy PolyGram for $10.4 billion, Seagram Co. designated Doug Morris the future head of the combined music entity--the largest record company in the world. Morris, a former songwriter and highly regarded industry veteran, will take over as chairman and chief executive of the record giant, to be named Universal Music Group, following approval of the deal by government regulators--a process that could take five months or more.
BUSINESS
November 17, 1995 | SCOTT COLLINS
Top music industry executives at Warner Music and MCA have spent much of the past 18 months in a high-stakes game of musical chairs. * July, 1994: Robert Krasnow, chairman of Warner's Elektra Entertainment, resigns and later signs a deal to run his own label at MCA. * August, 1994: Mo Ostin, who ran Warner Bros. Records for three decades, announces his resignation after being told he would have to report to Warner executive Doug Morris. In September, 1995, Ostin and former Warner Bros.
BUSINESS
June 23, 1995 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gangsta rap critics on Thursday applauded Time Warner Inc.'s decision to fire Doug Morris, the media giant's staunchest advocate for cutting-edge music, viewing his termination as a response to their demand to ban violent and sexually explicit lyrics. However, Time Warner executives said the firing resulted from management disagreements and had nothing to with the rap controversy.
BUSINESS
May 30, 1998 | Chuck Philips
Doug Morris is expected to be tapped soon to oversee Seagram Co.'s new global music operations in the wake of its $10.6-billion deal to purchase music giant PolyGram, sources said. The company has yet to make a formal announcement. Morris has been chairman of Seagram's Universal Music Group since 1995 and is credited with transforming the once-dormant record division into a domestic rock powerhouse with the addition of his own Universal label and Interscope Records.
BUSINESS
November 26, 1997 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Less than two years ago, music veteran Doug Morris launched a tiny New York label with a unique management philosophy. Morris, 57, who had just been fired as domestic chief of Time Warner's music division, decided to build a record company with a diverse, multicultural staff and executive team. The label was financed by Seagram, which later hired Morris to run its global music division.
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