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Douglas Brinkley

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January 23, 2011 | By Geoffrey Mohan, Los Angeles Times
The Quiet World Saving Alaska's Wilderness Kingdom 1879-1960 Douglas Brinkley HarperCollins: 576 pp., $29.99 Fresh off his 800-plus-page Theodore Roosevelt biography, "Wilderness Warrior," historian Douglas Brinkley tackles eight decades of American conservation history in "The Quiet World: Saving Alaska's Wilderness Kingdom, 1879-1960". Comparatively svelte at 576 pages, "A Quiet World" is the second of what Brinkley hopes will be his "Wilderness Cycle. " "Allan Nevins wrote eight volumes on the Civil War and Dumas Malone wrote five volumes on Thomas Jefferson.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2012 | By Wendy Smith, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Cronkite Douglas Brinkley Harper: 820 pp., $34.99 Walter Cronkite was not inclined to introspection, and historian Douglas Brinkley emulates his subject in this thorough biography of the news broadcaster who in 1972 was declared "The Most Trusted Man in America. " Brinkley's lengthy narrative spends as much time on Cronkite's stints as a paperboy as on his father's alcoholism and his parents' divorce. The author seems more interested in the ins and outs of Cronkite's strained professional relationship with Dan Rather than in his 65-year marriage - though smart, sardonic Betsy Cronkite gets her due as the woman who could cut Walter down to size.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2005 | Martin Miller, Times Staff Writer
It's one thing to write about history as Douglas Brinkley has done for more than two decades, often to much fanfare and acclaim. It's quite another to be swept up with your young family by its fast-moving and unpredictable currents.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2011 | By Geoffrey Mohan, Los Angeles Times
The Quiet World Saving Alaska's Wilderness Kingdom 1879-1960 Douglas Brinkley HarperCollins: 576 pp., $29.99 Fresh off his 800-plus-page Theodore Roosevelt biography, "Wilderness Warrior," historian Douglas Brinkley tackles eight decades of American conservation history in "The Quiet World: Saving Alaska's Wilderness Kingdom, 1879-1960". Comparatively svelte at 576 pages, "A Quiet World" is the second of what Brinkley hopes will be his "Wilderness Cycle. " "Allan Nevins wrote eight volumes on the Civil War and Dumas Malone wrote five volumes on Thomas Jefferson.
BOOKS
May 7, 2006 | Dante Ramos, Dante Ramos is deputy editorial page editor of the Times-Picayune in New Orleans.
AFTER Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast last August, television viewers around the world watched a long phantasmagoria of human beings in agony -- desperate New Orleanians clinging to rooftops, wading through murky floodwaters, wandering along expressways, dying outside the convention center under a blazing sun. More than 1,500 people perished in Louisiana and Mississippi, but the toll could have been far higher.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 2009 | Christoph Irmscher, Irmscher is the editor of "John James Audubon: Writings and Drawings" and teaches 19th century American literature at Indiana University, Bloomington.
The Wilderness Warrior Theodore Roosevelt and the Crusade for America Douglas Brinkley Harper: 960 pp., $34.99 Reviewing several Roosevelt biographies in 1920, H.L. Mencken reported that he had found more "gush" than "sense." Douglas Brinkley's "The Wilderness Warrior," a novel attempt to tell Theodore Roosevelt's life not from the cradle to the grave but with a focus on his subject's environmental interests, walks a fine line between the two, giving us plenty of sense -- and good sense too -- along with the expected truckload of gush.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2012 | By Wendy Smith, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Cronkite Douglas Brinkley Harper: 820 pp., $34.99 Walter Cronkite was not inclined to introspection, and historian Douglas Brinkley emulates his subject in this thorough biography of the news broadcaster who in 1972 was declared "The Most Trusted Man in America. " Brinkley's lengthy narrative spends as much time on Cronkite's stints as a paperboy as on his father's alcoholism and his parents' divorce. The author seems more interested in the ins and outs of Cronkite's strained professional relationship with Dan Rather than in his 65-year marriage - though smart, sardonic Betsy Cronkite gets her due as the woman who could cut Walter down to size.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2007 | Jack Nelson, Special to The Times
THE nation's 38th president didn't live quite long enough to bask in the glow of the latest assessment of his presidency, "Gerald R. Ford" by historian Douglas Brinkley. Ford, who died Dec. 26, would have seen that his pardon of Richard M. Nixon has not only faded as a negative in the eyes of most Americans, but also is now judged a distinct positive. Moreover, Brinkley gives Ford high marks for restoring Americans' faith in their government as well as for several foreign and domestic successes.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2007 | Tim Rutten, Times Staff Writer
THERE is a great deal of great interest in "The Reagan Diaries," but what sets the late president's personal recollections of his eight years in the White House apart from the recent spate of tell-all, inside-Washington books is what's absent: You can scour this thick volume from back to front and find not a trace of self-righteousness, self-pity or self-justification -- all standard issue accouterments among today's office-holders and political appointees, whether their veins bleed red or blue.
BOOKS
February 22, 2004 | David J. Garrow, David J. Garrow is the author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning "Bearing the Cross," a biography of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.
John Kerry enlisted in the Navy four months before graduating from Yale University in 1966. With U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War escalating rapidly, joining voluntarily offered more attractive options to a young college graduate than did waiting to be drafted. After completing officer candidate school, 23-year-old Ensign Kerry was assigned to the guided-missile frigate U.S.S. Gridley, based in Long Beach.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 2009 | Christoph Irmscher, Irmscher is the editor of "John James Audubon: Writings and Drawings" and teaches 19th century American literature at Indiana University, Bloomington.
The Wilderness Warrior Theodore Roosevelt and the Crusade for America Douglas Brinkley Harper: 960 pp., $34.99 Reviewing several Roosevelt biographies in 1920, H.L. Mencken reported that he had found more "gush" than "sense." Douglas Brinkley's "The Wilderness Warrior," a novel attempt to tell Theodore Roosevelt's life not from the cradle to the grave but with a focus on his subject's environmental interests, walks a fine line between the two, giving us plenty of sense -- and good sense too -- along with the expected truckload of gush.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2007 | Tim Rutten, Times Staff Writer
THERE is a great deal of great interest in "The Reagan Diaries," but what sets the late president's personal recollections of his eight years in the White House apart from the recent spate of tell-all, inside-Washington books is what's absent: You can scour this thick volume from back to front and find not a trace of self-righteousness, self-pity or self-justification -- all standard issue accouterments among today's office-holders and political appointees, whether their veins bleed red or blue.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2007 | Jack Nelson, Special to The Times
THE nation's 38th president didn't live quite long enough to bask in the glow of the latest assessment of his presidency, "Gerald R. Ford" by historian Douglas Brinkley. Ford, who died Dec. 26, would have seen that his pardon of Richard M. Nixon has not only faded as a negative in the eyes of most Americans, but also is now judged a distinct positive. Moreover, Brinkley gives Ford high marks for restoring Americans' faith in their government as well as for several foreign and domestic successes.
BOOKS
May 7, 2006 | Dante Ramos, Dante Ramos is deputy editorial page editor of the Times-Picayune in New Orleans.
AFTER Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast last August, television viewers around the world watched a long phantasmagoria of human beings in agony -- desperate New Orleanians clinging to rooftops, wading through murky floodwaters, wandering along expressways, dying outside the convention center under a blazing sun. More than 1,500 people perished in Louisiana and Mississippi, but the toll could have been far higher.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2005 | Martin Miller, Times Staff Writer
It's one thing to write about history as Douglas Brinkley has done for more than two decades, often to much fanfare and acclaim. It's quite another to be swept up with your young family by its fast-moving and unpredictable currents.
BOOKS
February 22, 2004 | David J. Garrow, David J. Garrow is the author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning "Bearing the Cross," a biography of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.
John Kerry enlisted in the Navy four months before graduating from Yale University in 1966. With U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War escalating rapidly, joining voluntarily offered more attractive options to a young college graduate than did waiting to be drafted. After completing officer candidate school, 23-year-old Ensign Kerry was assigned to the guided-missile frigate U.S.S. Gridley, based in Long Beach.
BOOKS
July 5, 1998 | MONICA CROWLEY, Monica Crowley served as foreign policy and research assistant to former President Richard Nixon from 1990 until his death in 1994 and is author of "Nixon Off the Record" and, most recently, "Nixon in Winter."
The American president leaves the White House for the last time, ending a tenure marked by perceived failure, flies home to begin his new life as a former president, is greeted by several thousand loyal supporters, spends some time in self-imposed exile, writes his memoirs, nurses a grudge against his old nemesis, the Washington Post, advises and angers his successors, gets frozen out of the White House by those successors, takes foreign policy into his own hands, gets snubbed by his own party
BOOKS
June 29, 1997 | PAUL KRASSNER, Paul Krassner is the publisher of the countercultural journal The Realist and the author of numerous books, including his latest collection of satiric sketches, "The Winner of the Slow Bicycle Race" now in paperback from Seven Stories Press. His album, "Brain Damage Control," will be released in July by Mercury Records
Imagine how Hunter Thompson might have covered the O.J. Simpson trial. Phil Bronstein, executive editor at the San Francisco Examiner, told me, "I thought Hunter would be the perfect person to write about the trial." They even met at a waterfront restaurant to discuss that possibility. "Hunter's face was all banged up," Bronstein recalled. "He claimed he had gone night-diving and scraped his face on a rock.
BOOKS
July 5, 1998 | MONICA CROWLEY, Monica Crowley served as foreign policy and research assistant to former President Richard Nixon from 1990 until his death in 1994 and is author of "Nixon Off the Record" and, most recently, "Nixon in Winter."
The American president leaves the White House for the last time, ending a tenure marked by perceived failure, flies home to begin his new life as a former president, is greeted by several thousand loyal supporters, spends some time in self-imposed exile, writes his memoirs, nurses a grudge against his old nemesis, the Washington Post, advises and angers his successors, gets frozen out of the White House by those successors, takes foreign policy into his own hands, gets snubbed by his own party
BOOKS
June 29, 1997 | PAUL KRASSNER, Paul Krassner is the publisher of the countercultural journal The Realist and the author of numerous books, including his latest collection of satiric sketches, "The Winner of the Slow Bicycle Race" now in paperback from Seven Stories Press. His album, "Brain Damage Control," will be released in July by Mercury Records
Imagine how Hunter Thompson might have covered the O.J. Simpson trial. Phil Bronstein, executive editor at the San Francisco Examiner, told me, "I thought Hunter would be the perfect person to write about the trial." They even met at a waterfront restaurant to discuss that possibility. "Hunter's face was all banged up," Bronstein recalled. "He claimed he had gone night-diving and scraped his face on a rock.
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