Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsDouglas Dalton
IN THE NEWS

Douglas Dalton

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1990 | TED ROHRLICH, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
A Los Angeles lawyer who spends most of his time defending alleged white collar criminals has been appointed special counsel to the grand jury to direct its jailhouse informant investigation. The lawyer, Douglas Dalton, 60, replaces former California Supreme Court Justice Otto Kaus.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2008 | Greg Braxton, Times Staff Writer
The original defense and prosecuting attorney in the Roman Polanski trial took the unusual step Wednesday of issuing a joint statement that accused a longtime Los Angeles Superior Court judge of lying, and continuing the judicial bungling that has marked the sex scandal since 1977. Former District Atty. Roger Gunson, the prosecutor in the Polanski case, and Douglas Dalton, the film director's defense attorney, said Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Larry Paul Fidler discussed a deal in 1997 that would allow the director back into the country with the possibility of no jail time.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2008 | Greg Braxton, Times Staff Writer
The original defense and prosecuting attorney in the Roman Polanski trial took the unusual step Wednesday of issuing a joint statement that accused a longtime Los Angeles Superior Court judge of lying, and continuing the judicial bungling that has marked the sex scandal since 1977. Former District Atty. Roger Gunson, the prosecutor in the Polanski case, and Douglas Dalton, the film director's defense attorney, said Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Larry Paul Fidler discussed a deal in 1997 that would allow the director back into the country with the possibility of no jail time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1990 | TED ROHRLICH, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
A Los Angeles lawyer who spends most of his time defending alleged white collar criminals has been appointed special counsel to the grand jury to direct its jailhouse informant investigation. The lawyer, Douglas Dalton, 60, replaces former California Supreme Court Justice Otto Kaus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 2009 | Joe Mozingo
In the flat light of the grand jury room, a nervous, deeply embarrassed 13-year-old girl sat alone -- no attorney, no mother, no friend -- facing three tiers of middle-aged strangers silently studying her from their leather armchairs. The questions that day in March 1977 were clinical in tone. The answers would set off a furor from Hollywood to London and Paris that has yet to subside. Samantha Gailey -- sandy brown hair, dimpled chin, missing class at her junior high in Woodland Hills -- described her alleged rape by director Roman Polanski two weeks before at Jack Nicholson's home above Franklin Canyon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 2009 | Harriet Ryan
Fugitive filmmaker Roman Polanski will not return to the U.S. this week to meet a court deadline for his surrender, his attorneys said Monday. In a filing in Los Angeles County Superior Court, the lawyers reasserted their claim that Polanski, 75, should not have to turn himself in for a judge to throw out a 1977 child sex case that the acclaimed director says was tainted by judicial and prosecutorial wrongdoing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 1990
The appointment of Douglas Dalton as special counsel to the grand jury investigating the alleged misuse of jailhouse informants by the district attorney's office is a welcome step toward cleansing the stain of suspicion that has for too long marred Los Angeles County's criminal justice system. Dalton, 60, an experienced and respected lawyer, is a former member of the California State Bar's board of governors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 1990 | LINDA CHONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Christian Scientist couple who prayed for their dying son rather than seek medical help have been acquitted of involuntary manslaughter and child endangerment charges, officials said. In a non-jury trial, Santa Monica Superior Court Judge Robert Thomas ruled Friday that there was insufficient evidence to prove that Eliot D. Glaser, 32, and his wife, Lise, 31, of Van Nuys exercised wanton disregard for the life of their 17-month-old son, Seth, by not taking him to a hospital when he became ill.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 1994 | PAUL FELDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An attorney for the woman who was sexually assaulted as a child by film director Roman Polanski in 1977 said his client would like to see the criminal case settled once and for all--including an arrangement under which Polanski could return to the United States without serving prison time. "It's in everyone's best interest that this sorry event which occurred now 17 years ago be put to rest and allow the parties to live their lives as normally as possible," attorney Lawrence Silver said.
NEWS
March 14, 1985 | ROBERT W. STEWART, Times Staff Writer
Murder charges were filed this week against two Christian Scientists in the death of their 17-month-old son, who died after the Culver City couple allegedly chose to pray for his recovery rather than seek medical aid. Deputy Dist. Atty. David F. Wells said he filed the additional charges of murder and child neglect, a misdemeanor, against Eliot D. Glaser, 27, and Lise E. Glaser, 26, as a result of evidence presented at a preliminary hearing earlier this year.
NEWS
May 13, 1988 | MILES CORWIN, Times Staff Writer
The embezzlement, fraud and tax evasion trial of former UC Santa Barbara Chancellor Robert Huttenback and his wife, Freda, got under way here this week with the prosecution charging that Huttenback "ripped off the university" and a defense lawyer describing the alleged embezzlement as "a misunderstanding." The prosecution charges that the Huttenbacks illegally spent about $200,000 in university funds for improvements on their home and for personal use.
OPINION
February 9, 2002
Re " 'We Behaved as Badly as Anybody,' " Feb. 2: It was interesting to read that during the so-called witch hunts in Hollywood of the '50s, many believed communists posed a real threat to the movie industry. Testimony from the era released last year by the National Archives indicates that communists had indeed infiltrated trade unions, inserted pro-communist messages into scripts and taught actors and directors how to portray pro-communist attitudes in their scenes. The evidence seems to be well established.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|