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Douglas Fairbanks

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1986
Margery Wilson, a silent screen actress best remembered for her portrayal of Brown Eyes in D. W. Griffith's 1916 classic "Intolerance," has died in an Arcadia convalescent home, it was learned Sunday. She was 89 and made about 25 films with such other silent stars as William S. Hart and Douglas Fairbanks Sr. before leaving films for a writing career.
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NEWS
December 31, 1988 | United Press International
Julanne J. Rust, a former Hollywood film star who played the princess romanced by Douglas Fairbanks Sr. in the silent film classic "The Thief of Baghdad," has died at age 88. Rust, who acted under her given name, Julanne Johnson, went to Hollywood as a Ruth Denis dancer in 1923 and stayed for 10 years, bridging the gap from silent films to the talkies. She also starred in European films. She died Dec. 26 in Cottage Hospital.
NEWS
January 25, 1987
Having been among those who in 1924 enjoyed seeing "The Thief of Bagdad" at the Biograph Theater in Chicago and who afterwards sent a dime (!) to some Hollywood address and eventually received an 8x10 print of Douglas Fairbanks Sr. from that movie, I was confused when I noted the capsuled listing in Television Times on Jan. 9 that informed us that an "audacious rogue" was "questing for a beautiful princess (Anna May Wong)." I am happy to see that the following week's issue corrected that error and Julanne Johnston was listed as the princess.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2011
The Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel opened in 1927, financed by such Hollywood luminaries as MGM studio head Louis B. Mayer and superstar couple Mary Pickford and Douglas Fairbanks. As soon as the hotel threw open its doors, it was the place to be seen in town. On May 16, 1929, the first Academy Awards ceremony was held in the hotel's fashionable Blossom Room. The winners had been announced to the press three months earlier. It was the only time the awards were held there.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2011
Sessue Hayakawa The Japanese star earned a supporting actor Oscar nomination for David Lean's classic 1957 "The Bridge on the River Kwai" as rigid POW camp commander Col. Saito. Miyoshi Umeki The first Asian to win an acting Oscar. Umeki won the supporting actress award for 1957's "Sayonara" as the ill-fated Japanese bride of an American serviceman. Anna May Wong The Chinese American actress received a lot of attention from critics and audiences as the Mongol slave in Douglas Fairbanks' 1924 swashbuckler "The Thief of Bagdad.
NEWS
December 10, 1992
Rita Corday, the Tahitian-born daughter of Swiss diplomats who appeared primarily in a string of second-feature films during the 1940s and 1950s, has died, it was learned this week. A family friend said Corday died Nov. 23 at a Century City hospital of the complications of diabetes after surgery. She was believed to be in her 70s. She appeared under her own name and as Paula Corday and Paula Croset in pictures, beginning in 1943 with "Hitler's Children."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2012 | Susan King
Contrary to popular belief, the Corvette convertible the characters Tod Stiles and Buz Murdock drove on the existential black-and-white 1960-64 CBS series "Route 66" was not red and white. "The original ones were blue," said George Maharis, 83, who starred as the handsome, dangerous and hotheaded Buz, who set out to travel the country with Tod (Martin Milner), a clean-cut young man who had grown up in luxury only to discover after his father's death that most of the money was gone.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2011
The landscape of Hollywood Boulevard is constantly evolving. But one constant is Musso & Frank Grill at 6667 Hollywood Blvd. Named for the original owners, Joseph Musso and Frank Toulet, the grill opened in 1919 and is Hollywood's oldest restaurant. During the golden age of Hollywood, the restaurant attracted such writers as F. Scott Fitzgerald, Raymond Chandler, William Faulkner and Ernest Hemingway. There's even a legend that silent film superstars Charlie Chaplin, Rudolph Valentino and Douglas Fairbanks raced horses down the boulevard and the losers picked up the tab at the restaurant.
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