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Douglas Fairbanks

ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2011
There are few remnants left of the venerable Ambassador Hotel, the site of Sen. Robert F. Kennedy's shooting in 1968, after it was demolished to make way for the Robert F. Kennedy Community Schools that opened last year. There's still the east wall, which was the location of the famed Cocoanut Grove nightclub. Designed by Pasadena architect Myron Hunt, the glitzy spot opened on New Year's Day 1921 and quickly became a Hollywood favorite. During its first decade, Charlie Chaplin, Douglas Fairbanks, Mary Pickford, Rudolph Valentino and Gloria Swanson were frequent visitors.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 1986 | TERRY ATKINSON
"Sinbad the Sailor." RKO. $29.95 ($19.95 until Sept. 1). The movies began exploiting Douglas Fairbanks Jr.'s family ties when he was 13, and though capable in sophisticated parts he was repeatedly drawn back to swashbuckling. This title role most resembled the characters his father played, and though not as acrobatic as Douglas Sr., his Sinbad exudes great energy, humor and charm.
NEWS
September 29, 1993
Marjorie Trumbull, 82, known for her celebrity radio interviews from the top of San Francisco's Mark Hopkins Hotel. Mrs. Trumbull, a pioneering interviewer in the electronic media, earned fame in the 1940s for her interviews on KSFO. She later appeared on television station KRON's "Exclusively Yours" and was a bimonthly regular on the NBC "Home" show. Over 20 years, she once estimated, she interviewed 35,000 people including then-Vice President Richard M.
BUSINESS
June 8, 1999 | From Bloomberg News
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Inc. is converting its United Artists Pictures unit to a specialty-film production division, focusing on smaller-budget films by independent makers. The money-losing movie and entertainment company, which owns one of the largest film libraries in the world with more than 5,000 titles, said all mainstream film production and existing UA staff will move to MGM Pictures under President Michael Nathanson.
BUSINESS
January 26, 2012 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
Three years after a controversial decision to close Hollywood's best-known nursing home, the Motion Picture & Television Fund has reversed course and said it would immediately begin admitting new residents to the historic Woodland Hills facility. The decision marks a victory for residents and their families who waged a highly public campaign to fight the fund's decision in January 2009 to close the facility, known as the Motion Picture Home, and an adjoining hospital. It also revives a time-honored charity — created in 1921 by United Artists studio founders Charlie Chaplin, Mary Pickford, Douglas Fairbanks, D.W. Griffith and others — that has been home to Hollywood luminaries such as actors Johnny Weismuller and Hattie McDaniel and film director Stanley Kramer, whose credits include "High Noon.
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