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Douglas Lute

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NATIONAL
May 16, 2007 | Julian E. Barnes and Peter Spiegel, Times Staff Writers
After a lengthy and difficult search, President Bush has tapped a three-star Army general as his new "war czar," with White House authority to pull together increasingly frayed federal efforts to deal with the protracted wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Lt. Gen. Douglas E. Lute, the operations director for the Pentagon's Joint Staff, will fill the job, which is part of the White House's National Security Council, administration officials said.
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NATIONAL
August 11, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
The United States may need to consider renewing the military draft, Lt. Gen. Douglas Lute, presidential coordinator for the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, said in an interview on National Public Radio. "I think it makes sense to certainly consider it, and I can tell you, this has always been an option on the table," Lute said in response to a question about whether a draft would make sense militarily. Still, a draft is "a national policy decision point that we have not yet reached," Lute said.
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NATIONAL
August 11, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
The United States may need to consider renewing the military draft, Lt. Gen. Douglas Lute, presidential coordinator for the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, said in an interview on National Public Radio. "I think it makes sense to certainly consider it, and I can tell you, this has always been an option on the table," Lute said in response to a question about whether a draft would make sense militarily. Still, a draft is "a national policy decision point that we have not yet reached," Lute said.
NATIONAL
June 8, 2007 | Peter Spiegel, Times Staff Writer
The man chosen by President Bush to become his new "war czar" told Congress on Thursday that national security advisor Stephen Hadley would no longer be responsible for Iraq policy, indicating the administration has quietly engineered a significant change in foreign policy leadership that could directly affect U.S. war strategy. Army Lt. Gen. Douglas E.
NATIONAL
June 8, 2007 | Peter Spiegel, Times Staff Writer
The man chosen by President Bush to become his new "war czar" told Congress on Thursday that national security advisor Stephen Hadley would no longer be responsible for Iraq policy, indicating the administration has quietly engineered a significant change in foreign policy leadership that could directly affect U.S. war strategy. Army Lt. Gen. Douglas E.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 2010 | By Tim Rutten, Los Angeles Times
The essential outline of the story journalist and political historian Bob Woodward sets out to tell in "Obama's Wars" actually is fairly well known. President Obama's agonized march to a decision on how to move forward in what he has called "a war of necessity" in Afghanistan has been widely reported and analyzed. It's well known, for example, that the lack of good options bitterly divided the president's advisors and that the chief executive immersed himself in the details of the decision that ultimately produced a modified version of the "surge" strategy that the Bush administration used to stabilize — temporarily, at least — Iraq.
NEWS
November 29, 2007 | Bruce Ackerman, Bruce Ackerman, a professor of law and political science at Yale, is the author of "Before the Next Attack: Preserving Civil Liberties in an Age of Terrorism."
Despite the show at Annapolis, this week's main diplomatic initiative has concerned Iraq, not Israel. Without any fanfare, the Bush administration and Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri Maliki announced that the United States and Iraq will begin negotiating a long-term agreement that will set the terms of Washington's Iraq policy for "coming generations." President Bush is again in legacy mode. His White House "czar" on Iraq, Army Lt. Gen.
NATIONAL
December 1, 2005 | Tyler Marshall and Mark Mazzetti, Times Staff Writers
Much of the rhetoric was familiar. But in his U.S. Naval Academy speech Wednesday, President Bush seemed to accept the hard realities both on the ground in Iraq and politically in the United States by pledging a smaller American force. After months of a lingering disconnect between the White House and senior military commanders, Bush's comments at the academy in Annapolis, Md., seemed to bring him into line not just with America's military but with much of his administration.
NEWS
February 19, 2013 | By David S. Cloud, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
WASHINGTON - Gen. John Allen, who was top commander in Afghanistan until Feb. 10, announced Tuesday that he is retiring from the Marine Corps due to his wife's chronic illness, turning down a White House offer to nominate him to be the supreme allied commander at NATO. Allen, who was cleared last month by the Pentagon inspector general of misconduct in connection with hundreds of emails he exchanged with a Florida socialite, said he was retiring after 38 years in uniform for personal reasons that included the need to care for his wife, Kathy Allen, who has an autoimmune disorder.
NATIONAL
February 19, 2013 | By David S. Cloud, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Gen. John Allen, the top commander in Afghanistan until 10 days ago, will retire from the Marine Corps to help care for his ailing wife rather than accept a White House nomination to be supreme allied commander at NATO, one of the Pentagon's most prestigious positions. The Pentagon inspector general cleared Allen last month of misconduct in connection with hundreds of emails he had exchanged with a Florida socialite who cultivated ties with senior military commanders.
NATIONAL
May 16, 2007 | Julian E. Barnes and Peter Spiegel, Times Staff Writers
After a lengthy and difficult search, President Bush has tapped a three-star Army general as his new "war czar," with White House authority to pull together increasingly frayed federal efforts to deal with the protracted wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Lt. Gen. Douglas E. Lute, the operations director for the Pentagon's Joint Staff, will fill the job, which is part of the White House's National Security Council, administration officials said.
NEWS
July 29, 2011 | By Ken Dilanian, Washington Bureau
The U.S. is "doubling down" on its strategy of covert targeted missile strikes in Pakistan in the wake of Osama bin Laden's death, believing that Al Qaeda is susceptible to a decisive blow, a senior Obama administration official said Friday. "I think there are three to five senior leaders that if they're removed from the battlefield, would jeopardize Al Qaeda's capacity to regenerate," said retired Gen. Douglas Lute, who oversees Afghanistan and Pakistan strategy at the National Security Council.
OPINION
June 12, 2007
THE UNITED STATES might have liked to wait until September for Army Gen. David H. Petraeus' report on the results of the troop surge in Iraq, but that wishful timetable has been overtaken by events. President Bush must begin planning a strategic and orderly disengagement that addresses the increasingly unstable geopolitical terrain. Three developments underscore the urgency of change. First, as Bush's nominee for war czar, Douglas E.
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